ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "Evo-errors"

Guest Blog

The Most Dangerous Jargon Viruses

Sci_am_Breaking_Word_Logic

“Rational” is the secular holy. We look to the rational—a most sacred and prestigious label in mind work—to save us. Yet some professors of a rational-is-holy faith aren’t being wholly rational. Their sect uses “rational” so differently it has become an unmeant trojan horse term. It looks good but hides destructive ideas. In a useful [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Is Breaking Bad Darwinian?

Sci_Am_Breading_Bad_Darwinian

“Darwin was no Darwinian.” Martin Luther King Jr said that before me. He was correct historically, scientifically, and morally. It’s a bad break for Darwin, and us, that his name is used to distort his ideas. Particularly as applied to humans. And TV shows. Breaking Bad‘s success rests on its moral complexities. They remind us [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Words Are Thinking Tools: Praxotype

Sci_Am_PraxoType

Words are thinking tools (as Daniel Dennett notes). New word-tools can sometimes avoid the baggage built into prior terms and thinking patterns. “Praxotype” and “cognotype” might help us better model human nature’s complexities (prax- meaning action, practice; cogn- meaning thinking). Emily Dickinson declared, “The Brain—is wider than the Sky.” Similarly, our praxotypes are wider than [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Non-Grapefruit and Fruitful Non-Science

Sci_am_sci_humanities_scopes

“Reason is larger than science.” So Leon Wieseltier reminds us in his essay “Crimes Against Humanities,” his reply to Steven Pinker’s “Science Is Not Your Enemy.” If well practiced, science reduces errors, but it grants no immunity to nonsense. The closer we get to people, the more utility the humanities have. Wieseltier mixes too much [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Food for Rethinking Markets

Sci_Am_Utiltiy_Unicorn

No perfect rationality is needed to see that markets often don’t work as advertised. But without perfect rationality, and other utopian conditions, the math of market theory doesn’t work. Businesses often ignore such unrealistic theorizing. So should we. “Free markets” are supposedly “efficient.” But by what stretch of reason, or misuse of words, can the [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Maxims Are Fitter Than Maximization

Sci_Am_Math_Thinking_Toolboxes

Maxims matter more than maximization. Much in life isn’t quantifiable, much less numerically maximizable. Words, logic, images, and patterns all can express more than numbers can. Numbers and mathematics do different things in physics than in evolution and economics. Economists, perhaps “in slavish imitation of…physicists,” unwisely ignore that evolution fitted us for maxims, not maximizations, [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Revolutionizing Economics by Evolutionizing It

Sci_Am_illo_Caveman_Money

Economics will soon be revolutionized, by being evolutionized, again. This time with fewer unnaturally selective ideas. Scholars, like those working with the Evolution Institute, are adapting the assumptions, methods, and goals of economics to better fit empirically observed humans. Our survival foreseeably requires it. Economics and evolution have always been deeply related. Natural selection crystallized [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Selfish Genes Also Must Cooperate

Sci Am Selfish Coop Gene Mix

Many followers of reason think it natural and rational to be selfish. They believe that’s just how evolution works. But Richard Dawkins, the cardinal spokesperson for that oversimplified and unnaturally selective view, is guilty of logical lapses and false prophecy. His pop-science of selfishness is widely misunderstood. “Selfish” genes that don’t cooperate don’t survive. A [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Behavioral Telescope Shows How Cooperation Works

Sci Am Behavioural Telescope

Nature’s games aren’t all “red in tooth and claw” competitions. Evolution can create stable cooperation. “Behavioral telescopes” provided by a new kind of logic have revealed laws of team productivity that are almost mathematical moral truths. Game theory is to the behavioral universe what the telescope was to Galileo, or calculus to Newton—a powerful new [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

We Fit Nature to Us: Evolution’s 2-Way Street

Sci Am New Evo Theory Need Stool

It is in our nature to fit nature to us. We are best at it, but other species do it. This obvious but overlooked factor contradicts the dominant one-way-street gene-centric view of adaptation. A better framework for evolution is needed. Its shape isn’t clear, but it must incorporate: extracorporeal gene effects, “gene-culture coevolution,” “niche construction,” [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Holiday Sale

Give a Gift &
Get a Gift - Free!

Give a 1 year subscription as low as $14.99

Subscribe Now! >

X

Email this Article

X