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Posts Tagged "blood"

Brainwaves

How the Antarctic Icefish Lost Its Red Blood Cells But Survived Anyway

In 1928, a biologist named Ditlef Rustad caught an unusual fish off the coast of Bouvet Island in the Antarctic. The “white crocodile fish,” as Rustad named it, had large eyes, a long toothed snout and diaphanous fins stretched across fans of slender quills. It was scaleless and eerily pale, as white as snow in [...]

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Guest Blog

For Diabetics, Healthy Habits Trump Medicine

syringe sticking up from a pile of granulated fine sugar

Against the backdrop of a government shutdown precipitated by healthcare issues and the rollout of the insurance exchanges mandated by the Affordable Care Act, a conference called Diabetes + Innovation 2013 took place in Washington, D.C. earlier this month. The gathering, organized by The Joslin Diabetes Center at Harvard Medical School, focused on prevention and [...]

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Guest Blog

Hallmarks of Cancer 5: Sustained Angiogenesis

Before and After Image depicting Angiogenesis

The Hallmarks of Cancer focus on 10 underlying principles shared by all cancers. You can read the first four Hallmarks of Cancer articles here. The Fifth Hallmark of Cancer is defined as “Sustained Angiogenesis.” In a developing embryo or a healing wound, communities of cells organize themselves into tissues, undertaking specialized tasks beyond the ability [...]

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Guest Blog

Blood Lust: The Early History of Transfusion

Medea, the sensual and ravishing sorceress of Greek mythology, enters the royal chambers. Knife in hand, she commands the servants to bring her an old sheep. Plunging her knife into the animal, she bleeds it nearly dry and then casts the limp sheep into a bubbling cauldron.  Its feeble bleating is soon replaced by the [...]

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Observations

Come Hang Out with Some World Changing Ideas

Oil that cleans water. Pacemakers powered by our own blood. Drones that can spy on you in your backyard. Scientific American has chosen these and seven other innovations as the leading developments in 2012 that could ultimately change our world. The radical ideas are not pie-in-the-sky notions but practical breakthroughs that have been proved or [...]

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Observations

Transplantable Blood Vessels Woven from Lab-Grown Human Tissue

woven blood vessel

More than 382,000 people with kidney disease in the U.S. are on dialysis, a painful procedure that can wreak havoc on blood vessels due to constant jabs from large needles. During dialysis, a patient’s blood is filtered out of their body and through a machine that performs the work normally done by the kidneys. Patients [...]

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Observations

Scabby knaves: Barnacles bind to ships using clotlike glue

barnacle glue blood clot scab

Hitchhiking on the surface of a boat hull can be a rough ride, but barnacles seem to do it with ease. How are they able to hang on so tightly? Researchers have been studying the composition of super-strong barnacle glue for years, and a new analysis of the cement reveals that it has many of [...]

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Observations

Queen Victoria’s curse: New DNA evidence solves medical and murder mysteries

queen victoria romanov hemophilia royal disease

Queen Victoria and many of her descendants carried what was once called "Royal disease"—now known as hemophilia, a blood clotting disorder. But it has remained unknown precisely what variety of the disease afflicted the family and how many deceased relatives may have had the inherited disease. Research published online today in Science sheds some light [...]

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Octopus Chronicles

Octopuses Survive Sub-Zero Temps Thanks to Specialized Blue Blood

octopus blue blood

Octopuses’ oddities run deep—right down to their blue-hued blood. And new research shows how genetic alterations in this odd-colored blood have helped the octopus colonize the world’s wide oceans—from the deep, freezing Antarctic to the warm equatorial tropics. The iron-based protein (hemoglobin) that carries oxygen in the blood for us red-blooded vertebrates becomes ineffective when [...]

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Symbiartic

Unsettling Blood

E_Whittaker_Bloodmini

Fine artist Elaine Whittaker is challenging us to see ourselves through the eyes of one of humanity’s greatest killers. Take a close look. The Swarm, a work made up of encaustic and over 1500 mosquitoes shipped from bug zappers in Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, is meant to unsettle.  Whittaker says, “If you stand long enough and [...]

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Symbiartic

The Greatest Self-Portrait of All Time…so far

Self2006-MarcQuinn-sq

Back in 1991, fine artist Marc Quinn, (one of what’s now known as the Young British Artists) started the greatest self-portrait project of all time. Self (blood head) is a self portrait that has been cast and frozen, made out of 4.5 litres of Quinn’s own blood, reportedly extracted over a period of about 5 [...]

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