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Michelangelo’s secret message in the Sistine Chapel: A juxtaposition of God and the human brain

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.


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At the age of 17 he began dissecting corpses from the church graveyard. Between the years 1508 and 1512 he painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Rome. Michelangelo Buonarroti—known by his first name the world over as the singular artistic genius, sculptor and architect—was also an anatomist, a secret he concealed by destroying almost all of his anatomical sketches and notes. Now, 500 years after he drew them, his hidden anatomical illustrations have been found—painted on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, cleverly concealed from the eyes of Pope Julius II and countless religious worshipers, historians, and art lovers for centuries—inside the body of God.

This is the conclusion of Ian Suk and Rafael Tamargo, in their paper in the May 2010 issue of the scientific journal Neurosurgery. Suk and Tamargo are experts in neuroanatomy at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1990, physician Frank Meshberger published a paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association deciphering Michelangelo’s imagery with the stunning recognition that the depiction in God Creating Adam in the central panel on the ceiling was a perfect anatomical illustration of the human brain in cross section. Meshberger speculates that Michelangelo surrounded God with a shroud representing the human brain to suggest that God was endowing Adam not only with life, but also with supreme human intelligence. Now in another panel The Separation of Light from Darkness (shown at left), Suk and Tamargo have found more. Leading up the center of God’s chest and forming his throat, the researchers have found a precise depiction of the human spinal cord and brain stem.

 Is the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel a 500 year-old puzzle that is only now beginning to be solved? What was Michelangelo saying by construction the voice box of God out of the brain stem of man? Is it a sacrilege or homage?

It took Michelangelo four years to complete the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. He proceeded from east to west, starting from the entrance of the Chapel to finish above the altar. The last panel he painted depicts God separating light from darkness. This is where the researchers report that Michelangelo hid the human brain stem, eyes and optic nerve of man inside the figure of God directly above the altar.

 Art critics and historians have long puzzled over the odd anatomical irregularities in Michelangelo’s depiction of God’s neck in this panel, and by the discordant lighting in the region. The figures in the fresco are illuminated diagonally from the lower left, but God’s neck, highlighted as if in a spotlight, is illuminated straight-on and slightly from the right. How does one reconcile such clumsiness by the world’s master of human anatomy and skilled portrayer of light with bungling the image of God above the altar? Suk and Tamargo propose that the hideous goiter-disfigured neck of God is not a mistake, but rather a hidden message. They argue that nowhere else in any of the other figures did Michelangelo foul up his anatomically correct rendering of the human neck. They show that if one superimposes a detail of God’s odd lumpy neck in the Separation of Light and Darkness on a photograph of the human brain as seen from below, the lines of God’s neck trace precisely the features of the human brain [see images at right].

There is something else odd about this picture. A role of fabric extends up the center of God’s robe in a peculiar manner. The clothing is bunched up here as is seen nowhere else, and the fold clashes with what would be the natural drape of fabric over God’s torso. In fact, they observe, it is the human spinal cord, ascending to the brain stem in God’s neck. At God’s waist, the robe twists again in a peculiar crumpled manner, revealing the optic nerves from two eyes, precisely as Leonardo Da Vinci had shown them in his illustration of 1487. Da Vinci and Michelangelo were contemporaries and acquainted with each other’s work.

The mystery is whether these neuroanatomical features are hidden messages or whether the Sistine Chapel a Rorshach tests upon which anyone can extract an image that is meaningful to themselves. The authors of the paper are, after all, neuroanatomists. The neuroanatomy they see on the ceiling may be nothing more than the man on the moon.

But Michelangelo also depicted other anatomical features elsewhere in the ceiling, according to other scholars; notably the kidney, which was familiar to Michelangelo and was of special interest to him as he suffered from kidney stones.

If the hidden figures are intentional, what do they mean? The authors resist speculation, but a great artist does not merely reproduce an object in a work of art, he or she evokes meaning through symbolism. Is Separation of Light from Darkness an artistic comment on the enduring clash between science and religion? Recall that this was the age when the monk Copernicus was denounced by the Church for theorizing that the Earth revolved around the sun. It was a period of struggle between scientific observation and the authority of the Church, and a time of intense conflict between Protestants and Catholics.

It is no secret that Michelangelo’s relationship with the Catholic Church became strained. The artist was a simple man, but he grew to detest the opulence and corruption of the Church. In two places in the masterpiece, Michelangelo left self portraits—both of them depicting himself in torture. He gave his own face to Saint Bartholomew’s body martyred by being skinned alive, and to the severed head of Holofernes, who was seduced and beheaded by Judith.

Michelangelo was a devout person, but later in life he developed a belief in Spiritualism, for which he was condemned by Pope Paul IV. The fundamental tenet of Spiritualism is that the path to God can be found not exclusively through the Church, but through direct communication with God. Pope Paul IV interpreted Michelangelo’s Last Judgment, painted on the wall of the Sistine Chapel 20 years after completing the ceiling, as defaming the church by suggesting that Jesus and those around him communicated with God directly without need of Church. He suspended Michelangelo’s pension and had fig leaves painted over the nudes in the fresco. According to the artist’s wishes, Michelangelo’s body is not buried on the grounds of the Vatican, but is instead interred in a tomb in Florence.

Perhaps the meaning in the Sistine Chapel is not of God giving intelligence to Adam, but rather that intelligence and observation and the bodily organ that makes them possible lead without the necessity of Church directly to God. The material is rich for speculation and the new findings will doubtlessly spark endless interpretation. We may never know the truth, but in Separation of Light from Darkness, Michelangelo’s masterpiece combines the worlds of art, religion, science, and faith in a provocative and awe inspiring work of art, which may also be a mirror.

 

Images from "Concealed Neuroanatomy in Michelangelo’s Separation of Light From Darkness in the Sistine Chapel," by Ian Suk and Rafael J. Tamargo in Neurosurgery, Vol. 66, No. 5, pp. 851-861.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

R. Douglas Fields, Ph. D. is the Chief of the Nervous System Development and Plasticity Section at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. Fields, who conducted postdoctoral research at Stanford University, Yale University, and the NIH, is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Neuron Glia Biology and member of the editorial board of several other journals in the field of neuroscience. He is the author of the new book The Other Brain (Simon and Schuster), about cells in the brain (glia) that do not communicate using electricity.   His hobbies include building guitars, mountain climbing, and scuba diving.  He lives in Silver Spring, Md.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.

5/27/10: Typographical errors were corrected thanks to readers’ comments.

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Comments 54 Comments

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  1. 1. Angelo Joseph 8:08 am 06/1/2010

    Great Article, although not totally convincing – but nothing ever is. Always room for some speculation. I happen to believe this is in part due to the sensitivity of the observer and the rose colored glasses through which they view the piece and the universe. The work is a priceless piece of art that transcends all this speculation and is appreciated for its own sake and astounding beauty.

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  2. 2. Angelo Joseph 8:18 am 06/1/2010

    Great article, although not totally convincing – but nothing ever is. there alway is and will be room for interpretation-part of what it means to be human-God did give us this wonderful power to rationalize and it does stem from the brain with which God endowed us. This work transcends all this this speculation, however and for me is appreciated, solely for its artistic and astounding and profound beauty.

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  3. 3. sittingbytheriver 12:59 pm 06/1/2010

    Yes, I agree. that left-brain tendency to evaluate "what is there" gets in the way of artistic appreciation. The only thing that really IS there is paint on plaster. All the rest is human perception.

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  4. 4. Scico 7:42 pm 06/1/2010

    When these neuroscientist authors lay on the grass and look at the clouds do they see shapes of the human brain? I don’t know what the brain looks like so I see sheep and big cotton balls.

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  5. 5. ScienceDuck157 9:38 pm 06/1/2010

    It seems to me that if you look at the painting, you can make an argument that it depicts whatever you want by choosing a particular section and using arbitrarily drawn lines. I think that these anatomists are seeing what the want to see, not necessarily what Michealangelo intended.

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  6. 6. robert schmidt 10:10 pm 06/1/2010

    @airihannah, "Also, is it me, or did anyone else notice that this particular image of "God" is also dressed in pink and appears to have breasts." When one considers that prior to that moment god had already existed for an eternity, in complete darkness with nothing around to occupy his time, I think it is understandable that he had poor fashion sense and a hefty pair of man boobs. Makes you wonder though, if he created Adam naked why did he feel the need to throw on the wife’s nightgown? Could he be trying to hide his sins or just embarrassed about the size of his junk?

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  7. 7. daivid rosenberg 2:37 am 06/2/2010

    "It was a period of struggle between scientific observation and the authority of the Church, and a time of intense conflict between Protestants and Catholics." What total nonsense! The Reformation hadn’t even started. Luther began his "protest" in 1517! For a scientist Fields makes a lousy historian. And the so-called "conflict between science and the authority of the Church" is a myth held to with dogmatic conviction by the current historical winners who get to re-write history to suit themselves.

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  8. 8. Melly 1:39 pm 06/2/2010

    Wonderful and amazing! But you need a really good editor, Mr. Fields.

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  9. 9. MeeMaw 6:47 pm 06/2/2010

    I hope that someone out there agrees with me when I say that you can find any image that you wish in a work of art if you look hard enough. I’m sure that they deserve a pat on the back for creativity, but if I walked around scrutinizing works of art for hidden messages I would find it too. Only I would admit that I was just pulling it out of my hind end.

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  10. 10. robert schmidt 10:19 pm 06/3/2010

    If you turn the image upside down it looks like male genitals. I wonder what Michelangelo was implying by sticking this down the lord’s throat…? Could explain why god created Adam first I guess.

    @MeeMaw, I agree. People see what they are looking for, what they expect to see, what they want to see. The article here on visual illusions should have taught the authors something about this.

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  11. 11. frankboase 4:33 am 06/5/2010

    Bruce Shaheen, Secretary
    A science teacher at Snow Canyon High School, St. George Utah, Bruce is a graduate of Southern Utah University. He has bachelor’s degrees in zoology and chemistry, and a master’s degree in Secondary Education.

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  12. 12. Bisaya Films 10:13 pm 06/5/2010

    I can’t see how the part leading to the chest is anyway related to an illustration of the human spinal chord. I hope I could get a closer look to the image or just a better illustration with a guide on how the stem was formed.

    Should we find more mysteries of Michelangelo, especially on the design of his drawing’s clothing, I hope someone could share it with me here: http://www.businessdeutschland.de/en/list-industries/leather-and-leatherware-33.html

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  13. 13. davidlkern 8:13 pm 06/8/2010

    What if Michelangelo told the truth, as all great artists must?

    What if the Buddha told the same truth? "With our thoughts," he is said to have said, "we make the world."

    What if the brain IS God? A re-reading of the creation myth in Genesis from this perspective is instructive. This was posited by my dear friend and teacher W. Brugh Joy, M.D. twenty years ago in his book Avalanche: Heretical Reflections on the Dark and the Light.

    Is it possible, then, that we create God in our own image? He sorta kinda looks like us in many depictions. Us, of course, meaning us men.

    Why not "She?" Why is God male? The brain is masculine, as the body is feminine. The fundamental split is brain/body, or good/evil, or light/dark, or masculine/feminine, spiritual/sexual, conscious/unconscious, us/them.

    Ha! Creatrix, more likely. Just look at her, at Nature, at woman! Much closer, I’m afraid, to the mystery of creation than I. Secretly afraid.

    Brain as God? Doesn’t this leave us without a legitimate Creator? No. It leaves us without a Concept, a Construct, a Belief, an idea, a thought about God. It leaves us with our first shot, as Brugh might say, of finding God.

    With the Garden of Eden as the womb, the story takes on profound new possibility, depth, meaning. It’s the story of the birth of each of us, and of all of us. It describes the struggle of the creation of conscious life forms, awakened to the knowledge of good and evil, male and female, I and thou, us and them. We are cast out of paradise (unconsciousness) into the cold cruel world. You remember.

    Not very Scientific, sir. No. More poetic. More symbolic. More artistic. Perhaps, as all artists must, Michelangelo told a deeper truth?

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  14. 14. davidlkern 8:28 pm 06/8/2010

    What if Michelangelo told the truth, as all great artists must?

    What if the Buddha told the same truth? "With our thoughts," he is said to have said, "we make the world."

    What if the brain IS God? A re-reading of the creation myth in Genesis from this perspective is instructive. This was posited by my friend and teacher W. Brugh Joy, M.D. twenty years ago, in his book Avalanche: Heretical Reflections on the Dark and the Light.

    Is it possible, then, that we create God in our own image? He sorta kinda looks like us in many depictions. Us, of course, meaning us men.

    Why not "She?" Why is God male? The brain is masculine, as the body is feminine. The fundamental split is brain/body, or good/evil, or light/dark, or masculine/feminine, spiritual/sexual, conscious/unconscious.

    Evil. Ha! Creatrix, more likely. Just look at her, at Nature, at woman! Much closer, I’m afraid, to the mystery of creation than I. Secretly afraid.

    Brain as God? Doesn’t this heresy leave us without a legitimate Creator? No. It leaves us without a Concept, a Construct, a Belief, an idea, a thought, however cherished- or fanciful. It leaves us with our first shot, as Brugh might say, of finding God.

    With the Garden of Eden as the womb, the story takes on profound new possibility, depth, meaning. It becomes the story of the birth of each of us, and of all of us. It describes the struggle of the creation of conscious life forms, awakened to the knowledge of good and evil, male and female, I and thou, life, and most of all death. We are cast out of paradise (unconsciousness) into the cold, cruel world. You remember.

    Not very Scientific, sir! No. More poetic. More symbolic. More artistic. Perhaps, as artists must, Michelangelo told a deeper truth.

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  15. 15. bukihash 4:46 am 06/9/2010

    True he seem to have breasts in the pic….I think he was trying to say (as described in the power of subconsciousness) that God is our brain. it can be described in a way that we think we communicate with God but we only send signals to our brain as we are talking to him. instead those signals and beliefs then impact some universal movements which happen when we believe something strongly. If they don’t happen we find excuses anyway as we didn’t deserve it or something like that.

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  16. 16. Cerebral*Origami 9:58 am 06/9/2010

    As to the point that people of the time thought the heart was the seat of the mind. That may very well been true of the average citizen or even of some of the more learned people of the time. But let us not forget Michelangelo was an anatomist. He had seen details of the human body no one else had. And anyone dissecting the heart would realize in short order that it is nothing more than muscle with a few flaps (the valves) thrown in. The brain on the other hand is extremely complex and has large nerve connections to the eyes and the spinal cord that connects to everything else. I had thought that, in ancient times, they believed the heart was the seat of emotion, the liver the source of the soul and the brain the source of thought.

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  17. 17. Cerebral*Origami 10:06 am 06/9/2010

    The Judeo-Christian God has always been depicted as male because at the time of the writings Men were the dominant sex with women being in a very submissive role. It is believed by many that God has no sex as He has no need to reproduce. As for paintings and art work dipicting Him as human that is the only way people had to create an icon of Him. Being created in his image refers (again it is believed there are no scriptures saying one way or another) that we were created to think and have the same values that he does.

    (I was a Christian minister for 25 years before becoming an atheist.)

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  18. 18. jhboettcher 6:58 pm 06/9/2010

    Total rubbish! What would be the point of disguising some odd view of a brain as the throat and beard of God? I don’t really see the resemblance anyway, and I think it is a bit delusional, much like seeing the Virgin in a potato chip as another reader quipped. It is true that painters often enjoy slipping images into clouds or other random places (and a picture of the Pope into the denizens of Hell I am told). A bit of humor and perhaps a few too many wines mixed with paint fumes, lying on his back painting the ceiling. When I was in Art School I did much the same, but in this case, I am quite sure the artist was simply trying to represent a face and throat from an odd perspective.

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  19. 19. donzzz 9:50 pm 06/9/2010

    Meshberger speculates that Michelangelo surrounded God with a shroud representing the human brain to suggest that God was endowing Adam not only with life, but also with supreme human intelligence.

    True – God revealed himself to mankind by giving the Homo Sapiens a powerful human imagination. Human Imagination is our only link with God, the creator of everything! It also gave us the power to progress through the ages.
    http://novan.com/god.htm

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  20. 20. Ronk 8:19 am 06/12/2010

    What utter nonsense.
    There was no "secret" that Michelangelo studfied anatomy and put anatomical features into his paintings. There was no "clash between science and religion" or "struggle between scientific observation and the authority of the Church"- this idea was only invented in the 19th century. Copernicus was never "denounced by the Church" (unless you mean the Lutheran church). It was not "a time of intense conflict between Protestants and Catholics." Protestantism had not yet been invented.

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  21. 21. Multiple-personalities 2:27 am 06/13/2010

    Don’t worry your just seeing your dominating ego being deflated of its higher intelligence as we bring you gently back down to earth for a birds eye tour that see through both eyes with nothing to divide but your wonderful civilization that’s built on nothing more than what’s half ass right!

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  22. 22. Multiple-personalities 2:28 am 06/13/2010

    Don’t worry your just seeing your dominating ego being deflated of its higher intelligence as we bring you gently back down to earth for a birds eye tour that see through both eyes with nothing to divide but your wonderful civilization that’s built on nothing more than what’s half ass right!

    Link to this
  23. 23. Multiple-personalities 2:31 am 06/13/2010

    Three times is the charm for your depression! Don’t worry your just seeing your dominating ego being deflated of its higher intelligence as we bring you gently back down to earth for a birds eye tour that see through both eyes with nothing to divide but your wonderful civilization that’s built on nothing more than what’s half ass right!

    Link to this
  24. 24. barron 7:56 am 06/14/2010

    Today, the biggest sin is not believing in God…but to be born poor. This is the fact of life.

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  25. 25. Gort 3:06 pm 06/17/2010

    Perhaps one could consult with a neurochemist and learn
    that all God perceptions lie within the brain via the 5ht-2a/2c
    receptors. A convenient brain lesion or receptor agonist will
    elicit the way more clearly. There is no God. Get over it and
    live a decent love filled life as possible.

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  26. 26. reginabee 8:47 pm 06/21/2010

    it looks more like a penis to me! Sorry! it does! lol!

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  27. 27. ToddKC 1:59 am 06/22/2010

    @Tom J – The ancient Egyptians considered the heart the seat of consciousness, but by the 14th century people were aware that the brain was the organ of thought.

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  28. 28. jeff.shaw 3:32 pm 06/22/2010

    Editors! "…role of fabric…"? These minor grammatical and typographical errors are getting more common in SciAm…what’s going on? Some are more serious than just typos, e.g., the latest issue classed benzene as a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ("PAH")! More vigilance, please!

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  29. 29. jeff.shaw 3:34 pm 06/22/2010

    Also, I wonder if this is just another Jesus-in-the-tortilla thing. The inset photo of a disembodied brain does little to convince me.

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  30. 30. CitizenWhy 3:41 pm 06/22/2010

    Vox Populi, Vox Dei? The voice of the people (not higher-ups) is the voice of God. A principle of the early church.

    In Genesis Adam & Eve relate directly with God, not through king/priests, as was the belief in the surrounding nations.

    Also in Genesis: "God created humanity, male and female God made them." The basis of religion would be right relationships, and the equal relationship of male and female would be reflective of humanity’s relationship with God. Of course this is a literary interpretation, not necessarily an interpretation from a believer.

    Perhaps Michelangelo came into contact with people who were familiar with St Maximus, a font of theological reflection in the Eastern Church. St. Maximus taught that all humanity came from God and would be returned to God, and that Christ’s mission was to unite God and humanity by becoming fully human, not to die on the cross in a "bloody sacrifice" to assuage humanity’s disobedience/insult to God and thereby redeem/buy back humanity’s salvation (dominant view in Western Church). Following his logic, Maximus also taught that humanity could not be united with God unless all humans were united with God. He taught that all humans, including those outside the church, would be saved. Humanity, as the image of God, would attain a union with God that would somehow preserve individuality while endowing each person with a shared divinity with God. We would indeed become "like to God."

    It is not too far fetched to think that the ideas of Maximus, including universal salvation and many paths to God outside the Church, would be familiar to Michelangelo. The last heir of the Byzantine Emperors, a Dominican friar from Cyprus, was bought to Rome and imprisoned by the Inquisition for teaching these ideas. For many years the Pope’s theologians tried to get him to recant these beliefs before burning him. Knolwedge of these prison debates must have leaked out.

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  31. 31. CitizenWhy 3:42 pm 06/22/2010

    Vox Populi, Vox Dei? The voice of the people (not higher-ups) is the voice of God. A principle of the early church.

    In Genesis Adam & Eve relate directly with God, not through king/priests, as was the belief in the surrounding nations.

    Also in Genesis: "God created humanity, male and female God made them." The basis of religion would be right relationships, and the equal relationship of male and female would be reflective of humanity’s relationship with God. Of course this is a literary interpretation, not necessarily an interpretation from a believer.

    Perhaps Michelangelo came into contact with people who were familiar with St Maximus, a font of theological reflection in the Eastern Church. St. Maximus taught that all humanity came from God and would be returned to God, and that Christ’s mission was to unite God and humanity by becoming fully human, not to die on the cross in a "bloody sacrifice" to assuage humanity’s disobedience/insult to God and thereby redeem/buy back humanity’s salvation (dominant view in Western Church). Following his logic, Maximus also taught that humanity could not be united with God unless all humans were united with God. He taught that all humans, including those outside the church, would be saved. Humanity, as the image of God, would attain a union with God that would somehow preserve individuality while endowing each person with a shared divinity with God. We would indeed become "like to God."

    It is not too far fetched to think that the ideas of Maximus, including universal salvation and many paths to God outside the Church, would be familiar to Michelangelo. The last heir of the Byzantine Emperors, a Dominican friar from Cyprus, was bought to Rome and imprisoned by the Inquisition for teaching these ideas. For many years the Pope’s theologians tried to get him to recant these beliefs before burning him. Knolwedge of these prison debates must have leaked out.

    Link to this
  32. 32. wildthing 5:57 pm 06/22/2010

    Ir is obviously god’s vagina put in a very unusual place but it explains how he gave birth to speech and as such speaks volumnes. Strangely enough it is also rather phallic so that may indicate the unisexual nature of God. Plus the way (s)he is fingering and massaging the heavens exemplifies the foreplay that is involved with creation itself and also the ultimate in taking pleasure in the act of creation and creationism!

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  33. 33. scrapeuse 9:48 am 06/23/2010

    Thank you Tom!! Your have hit the nail on the head!!!

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  34. 34. verdai 8:29 pm 06/24/2010

    those two great men seem still above us
    in their exact life and skill.

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  35. 35. rtaylortitle 8:36 am 06/25/2010

    As Ayn Rand once stated, the Attila the Huns and the Witch Doctors both compete to control man’s mind. Pity that time period when they were united as one.

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  36. 36. museredux 1:46 pm 06/26/2010

    Stunning article. To merely ask "sacrilege or homage" is distraction — indeed a symptom of the loss of "being." The metaphor to frame this in is hypostasis. Frame language, our tool of thought, as the fruit of Eden’s "Forbidden" Tree, consciousness itself as it split off from Nature. Michelangelo’s secret message is, like Jung’s, our wholeness; the gnowing that we’re rooted, and not split off at all. I think of a game I used to play with the kids as we drove through strange towns on long journeys. "None of these houses are what they appear to be," I’d tell them. "They’re facades, the people actors. They all stop the game after you pass by; it all exists just to make you think there’s really something real here." We’d laugh and consider this — yes, it’s quite the ground of psychosis, and, I think a good explore for the young mind as it’s taking its perspective. It’s also the mindset of Fundamentalist Christianity: the soul imprisoned in the body, man and his dominance over animals, the planet not as mother but as mere stage to act out some great test of obedience to a punishing god, heaven and hell the ultimate destination. Psychosis.

    Thank you, Michelangelo.

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  37. 37. BeastOfBurden 4:16 pm 06/28/2010

    And what’s about the boobs that are clearly visible?

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  38. 38. detrend 6:23 pm 06/28/2010

    Re the comment of Cataleptix:
    I belong to the Episcopal Church, and I have never felt "bullied" into its point of view.

    David T.

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  39. 39. Sandspeck 7:09 pm 06/28/2010

    It seems that Michaelangelo, Leonardo and Raphael, all attended meetings of groups that were concerned with ancient, esoteric knowledge, where the MIND and the heart were assigned an important role in conscious evolution, or in the capacity of human beings to be a self-evolving species. Those traditions held as truth that the brain DOESN’T do the thinking, that thinking SHAPES the brain, just as light "brings out" the optical nerves until eyes appear, but not so in species that live in darkness, where eyes aren’t needed. Old traditions like the Hermetic tradition, Gnosticism, etc., held that it was in the mind that evolution could be experienced and communication with God was possible – the heart, mind and speech (larynx) had to be ennobled, so that our thoughts, words and deeds would contribute to the evolution of human kind. It makes sense that Michaelangelo would place the brain in the area of the larynx, since in esoteric traditions, the Christ was sometimes called the LOGOS, meaning WORD. Some traditions state that in the future, when we have all mastered the WORD, and ennobled the larynx, this will be the place of birth for human beings, and not the female reproductive organs. They say that lust and sex will not be part of the process then. Does this help in understanding where these artists’ ideas came from?

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  40. 40. DInkSinger 11:04 pm 06/28/2010

    Dr. Fields writes "Recall that this was the age when the monk Copernicus was denounced by the Church for theorizing that the Earth revolved around the sun. It was a period of struggle between scientific observation and the authority of the Church, and a time of intense conflict between Protestants and Catholics."

    It certainly was the age in which these things happened, but Copernicus did not publish "De revolutionibus orbium coelestium" until 1543, the year he died, and it was not until 1616 that heliocentrism was officially denounced. This was more than a century after the Michelangelo Sistine ceiling painting discussed here. Up until that time there had been very little conflict between the church and science, except that Aristotle’s writings on "natural philosophy" has been condemned by the Synod of Sens (which includes Paris). The Reformation did not begin until 1516, so there was no intense conflict in 1508.

    "Pope Paul IV interpreted Michelangelo’s Last Judgment, painted on the wall of the Sistine Chapel 20 years after completing the ceiling, as defaming the church by suggesting that Jesus and those around him communicated with God directly without need of Church."

    Pope Paul IV was had some very strange ideas and did order the painting over of "obscene" portions of "The Last Judgement", but even with his believe that salvation could only come through the church, he certainly did not believe that Jesus needed the church to communicate with God. The church has taught since the fourth century that Jesus is God. John’s Gospel quote Jesus as saying "No one comes to the Father except through me.", so as a believer even Paul IV needed Jesus to communicate with God the Father. Even if he did hold this absurd opinion, since God the Father does not even appear in the picture, Jesus could not be depicted as communicating with him. The traditional interpretation of the painting is that Mary on her son’s right is turned away because it is now too late for her to intercede with him.

    An interesting paper "Michelangelo and Copernicus: A Note on the Sistine Last Judgement" by Valerie Shrimplin, University of Luton, published in the "Journal of the History of Astronomy" in 2000, brings these two topics together. It suggests that Michelangelo and Pope Clement VII who commissioned the painting were well are of Copernicus’ theory which although not published was widely circulated within intellectual circles and is reflected in the depiction of Christ the light as the center of the universe.

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  41. 41. silvrhairdevil 9:25 am 06/29/2010

    Very entertaining article – even the Spellcheck Homophonic Glitches (Google "lodge dock florist").

    Even more entertaining are the comments, many of which had me Laughing Out Loud… similar to LOL-ing.

    Link to this
  42. 42. dskan 9:34 am 06/29/2010

    If I remember correctly, wasn’t the prevailing view still the heart being the seat of human thought? And if that is the case, aren’t we assigning modern interpretations to old imagery?

    Precisely.

    If the authors wished, they could test their theory objectively by designing a computer search algorithm to attempt to match any part of the human anatomy with a fuzzy representation in the mural. The art is so massive that the probability of finding *anything* approaches one, even while the probability of finding any *one* thing might be vanishingly low.

    This is probability. It’s the same principle that shows the probability of sharing something in common with the woman next to you on your airplane flight is sky-high (bah… terrible.

    Here, however, we are probably also being fooled by the brain’s constant search for patterns amongst the randomness. The fact that a similarity exists doesn’t mean it was intentional. Make enough paintings with lines, and one will look like a brain. Enough monkeys at keyboards will eventually reproduce the complete works of George W. Bush.

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  43. 43. Sandspeck 11:36 am 06/29/2010

    How would one explain the contradictions in the handling of light, and the fact that the neck is so grotesque, compared to the rest of the art involved? I am curious. Symbols were quite common in art back then, it is only now that we see them everywhere but don’t recognize them anymore as such. Artists of today do similar things. It is difficult to understand (stand-under) the Renaissance mindset, because we have forgotten this type of consciousness. The important thing here is not whether it was intentional or not, but rather the fact that it is there – maybe he was simply inspired or his hands guided in this way by some unconscious impulse. I recommend reading his biography, along with Raphael’s and Leonardo’s: look at their childhoods, families, acquaintances, and how their art came about – something might be revealed about the artists that would help us understand their inner struggles and striving.

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  44. 44. lcsevero 3:50 pm 06/30/2010

    Two brazilian researchers, Doctor Gilson Barreto and chemist Marcelo Ganzarolli de Oliveira published in 2004 the book Arte Secreta de Michelangelo: uma lio de anatomia na Capela Sistina, by publisher ARX, that discloses 32 anatomical references hidden on Sistine Chapel ceiling. Different from previous works on the subject, they afirm to have found a pattern Michelangelo would have used to unfold those references to viewers, mainly in four ways: the position of the caracteres, their direction of gaze and the position of their hands (these last two often indicating directly to the hidden illustration), and the lighting of the scene. Perhaps the negative fact about this beautiful publication is that was released exclusively in portuguese, what keeps it distant of worldwide reach.

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  45. 45. ChrisCrawford 12:42 am 07/2/2010

    First off, I’d like to nitpick the spelling:

    " A role of fabric extends up the center of Gods robe in a peculiar manner. "

    It’s ROLL of fabric.

    Second, Copernicus published his work in 1543; Michelangelo painted this before 1512. I doubt that Michelangelo was inspired by the conflict with Copernicus. Also, there was no "intense conflict between Protestants and Catholics" because Martin Luther didn’t nail his 95 Theses to the church door until 1518. There was no perceived conflict between science and religion at that time, largely because science was only nascent at the time. The Church had always had controversies, but the situation in Rome between 1508 and 1512, when Michelangelo painted this, was not particularly tense. Whatever Michelangelo’s reasons for doing this were, if it indeed be an anatomical diagram, they had nothing to do with any imaginary conflict between science and religion.

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  46. 46. Ronk 7:37 am 07/4/2010

    Gort, God is love and love is God. If you live a love-filled life you live a God-filled life, whetrher you admit it or not. Or maybe you think "love" is just another illusion caused by a brain lesion.

    Link to this
  47. 47. paulserious 6:04 am 07/19/2010

    I can see lovely faces in clouds, the bathroom floor and ink splats!! Does this mean that someone did this, as Leonardo did in the Da Vinci Code?

    Link to this
  48. 48. efetov 12:54 pm 10/11/2010

    Prof. K.A. Efetov from the Ukraine has found that Michelangelo has encoded the external surface of human brain, as well as human genitals(!) in the Sistine Chapel frescoes. The details of the discovery, along with the proof, may be found here:
    http://digg.com/news/lifestyle/a_shocking_secret_of_the_sistine_chapel

    Link to this
  49. 49. sicarri 3:00 pm 10/19/2010

    The article has so many gross errors in it, it shouldn’t be published.
    1. Michelangelo was primarily a sculptor, considered the best sculptor in the world by the time he was 30 years old. This is why he studied anatomy – in the basement of a hospital – not a church graveyard (how ridiculous!).
    2. he destroyed his sketches so other artists couldn’t copy him. That was the only secret he was hiding. Raphael was one of the first artists to copy what he saw in the Sistine chapel.
    3. The coat behind God in the shape of the human brain – there was a doctor back in 1950 who first discovered that, and it’s common knowledge today. This authors’ claim is not new information.
    4. Michelangelo was not a "spiritualist" – and I demand to know the source for this claim. He did not have a strained relationship with the Church. He was a third order Franciscan and fought against the Protestant Reformation. Proof of this can be seen in his Last Judgment painting, also in the Sistine chapel.
    5. Here’s something else this author does not know: Scientists analyzed all of Michelangelo’s works – sculpture and painting – and discovered he had represented about 800 different muscle combinations.
    The average doctor today learns 600 different muscle combinations.
    6. As for the neck featuring a part of the human brain, quite frankly, I didn’t see it. I don’t see a match.

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  50. 50. Ma'aji Caleb Zonkwa 9:45 am 12/29/2010

    @nashv and bshaheen good reasoning on this article and to the author your effort and in depth comprehension of the painting is a welcome science matter of facts I hope some theologians will not crucify you with words.

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  51. 51. Leo Voisey 6:25 am 03/21/2012

    Stem cells are “non-specialized” cells that have the potential to form into other types of specific cells, such as blood, muscles or nerves. They are unlike “differentiated” cells which have already become whatever organ or structure they are in the body. Stem cells are present throughout our body, but more abundant in a fetus.
    Medical researchers and scientists believe that stem cell therapy will, in the near future, advance medicine dramatically and change the course of disease treatment. This is because stem cells have the ability to grow into any kind of cell and, if transplanted into the body, will relocate to the damaged tissue, replacing it. For example, neural cells in the spinal cord, brain, optic nerves, or other parts of the central nervous system that have been injured can be replaced by injected stem cells. Various stem cell therapies are already practiced, a popular one being bone marrow transplants that are used to treat leukemia. In theory and in fact, lifeless cells anywhere in the body, no matter what the cause of the disease or injury, can be replaced with vigorous new cells because of the remarkable plasticity of stem cells. Biomed companies predict that with all of the research activity in stem cell therapy currently being directed toward the technology, a wider range of disease types including cancer, diabetes, spinal cord injury, and even multiple sclerosis will be effectively treated in the future. Recently announced trials are now underway to study both safety and efficacy of autologous stem cell transplantation in MS patients because of promising early results from previous trials.
    History
    Research into stem cells grew out of the findings of two Canadian researchers, Dr’s James Till and Ernest McCulloch at the University of Toronto in 1961. They were the first to publish their experimental results into the existence of stem cells in a scientific journal. Till and McCulloch documented the way in which embryonic stem cells differentiate themselves to become mature cell tissue. Their discovery opened the door for others to develop the first medical use of stem cells in bone marrow transplantation for leukemia. Over the next 50 years their early work has led to our current state of medical practice where modern science believes that new treatments for chronic diseases including MS, diabetes, spinal cord injuries and many more disease conditions are just around the corner.
    There are a number of sources of stem cells, namely, adult cells generally extracted from bone marrow, cord cells, extracted during pregnancy and cryogenically stored, and embryonic cells, extracted from an embryo before the cells start to differentiate. As to source and method of acquiring stem cells, harvesting autologous adult cells entails the least risk and controversy.
    Autologous stem cells are obtained from the patient’s own body; and since they are the patient’s own, autologous cells are better than both cord and embryonic sources as they perfectly match the patient’s own DNA, meaning that they will never be rejected by the patient’s immune system. Autologous transplantation is now happening therapeutically at several major sites world-wide and more studies on both safety and efficacy are finally being announced. With so many unrealized expectations of stem cell therapy, results to date have been both significant and hopeful, if taking longer than anticipated.
    What’s been the Holdup?
    Up until recently, there have been intense ethical debates about stem cells and even the studies that researchers have been allowed to do. This is because research methodology was primarily concerned with embryonic stem cells, which until recently required an aborted fetus as a source of stem cells. The topic became very much a moral dilemma and research was held up for many years in the US and Canada while political debates turned into restrictive legislation. Other countries were not as inflexible and many important research studies have been taking place elsewhere. Thankfully embryonic stem cells no longer have to be used as much more advanced and preferred methods have superseded the older technologies. While the length of time that promising research has been on hold has led many to wonder if stem cell therapy will ever be a reality for many disease types, the disputes have led to a number of important improvements in the medical technology that in the end, have satisfied both sides of the ethical issue.
    CCSVI Clinic
    CCSVI Clinic has been on the leading edge of MS treatment for the past several years. We are the only group facilitating the treatment of MS patients requiring a 10-day patient aftercare protocol following neck venous angioplasty that includes daily ultrasonography and other significant therapeutic features for the period including follow-up surgeries if indicated. There is a strict safety protocol, the results of which are the subject of an approved IRB study. The goal is to derive best practice standards from the data. With the addition of ASC transplantation, our research group has now preparing application for member status in International Cellular Medicine Society (ICMS), the globally-active non-profit organization dedicated to the improvement of cell-based medical therapies through education of physicians and researchers, patient safety, and creating universal standards. For more information please visit http://www.neurosurgeonindia.org/

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  52. 52. common pilgrim 4:31 pm 06/17/2012

    Doesn’t it mean that Michelangelo knew that God was a figment of man’s imagination, and that the church was perpetuating the idea, exploiting poor, weak people, by preying on their fears?

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  53. 53. Leo Voisey 2:23 am 07/3/2012

    My name is David Summers of Murfreesboro, TN and I have had MS for 16 years. I am 37 years old and as of January 2012, was effectively an 8.0 on the EDSS scale. Originally RRMS, my disease progression had become SPMS (very progressive) within 4 years of onset. Normally anyone in my position and with my bleak diagnosis is limited to a short future, absolutely no quality of life and a painful end…possibly prior to my 40th birthday if the current progression of the disease continued (without the slightest hesitation or glimmer of hope, my Neurologist just told me: “ Prepare to deteriorate”). But after I heard about Dr. Zamboni’s ‘liberation therapy hypothesis’ in 2010, I began my search for the vein-widening therapy. This put me into a clinic in Duluth, Georgia where they were doing the liberation procedure. I received immediate positive results post-procedure…along with the surgeon’s warning that 50% of the MS patients who undergo the liberation therapy suffer a re-narrowing of the jugular veins within a year or so. Sure enough, within 3 months I knew that I was going to be among the unlucky 50%; all of the original improvements disappeared as I relapsed.

    I felt the only way forward was to get it done again, hopefully this time with more enduring results. But where would I go to get this done again and how would that be possible? If my neck veins restenosed after the first treatment, what was to prevent that from happening again…and again? I began to read the Internet blogs and forum chats placed on the many new CCSVI sites by MS patients about where to go and what their experiences were. In this respect, the Internet became a valuable educational tool for me. On several of the blogs, I discovered a New York clinic where they placed a stent during the procedure to keep the jugular veins open, and that positive results were being seen. Grimly, I also discovered that although rare, the prospect of death as a result of this procedure was also a risk. At least one person in a recent study had died when the stent migrated to his heart. But I was willing to put those thoughts and the risks aside. What did I really have to lose? I was dying a slow death. As long as someone was able to treat me there was a chance to hope, and I was down for it. But that wasn’t the main question I was asking myself.

    As my disease rapidly progressed and my disabilities became more overwhelming, the question I was asking myself was, was it too late for me? Although I was happy with the fact that my original liberation therapy had diminished most of the symptoms above my waist, I had to ask myself if getting stents was merely settling for a compromised improvement. Having had some success, if I had this done again, I wanted more! Don’t get me wrong, I think the liberation therapy is a miracle discovery from God. As soon as I had my first procedure my cog fog lifted, the vision in my right eye improved greatly, the numbness in both hands dissipated by a few degrees, my ability to taste food returned, my energy levels were ’off the charts’, and my sleep was so sweet. Also, because MS had robbed my body of the ability to regulate body temperature by sweating, I had not been able to handle the hot, humid Southern summers where I live, except to blast cold AC non-stop as a survival method during those sickly ‘dog days’. After the procedure this changed too. I knew it when deodorant suddenly became necessity for my personal hygiene once again!

    But it ended by the 90-day point and I was right back where I started. Immediately following the procedure I had dreams of rising from the wheelchair I’d been confined to for ten years and walking like a real man; but even with the incredible improvements overall, it seemed that the only healing occurred above the waist. Perhaps I would just have to accept that even if I could improve to what the full extent of the liberation therapy would allow, I would always be in a wheelchair. While researching the New York clinic and other places, my parents and I came upon CCSVI Clinic through a Google search. We discovered that they are essentially a research clinic operating under an IRB but with a major difference. For the past year, having seen even better results than just doing the liberation therapy alone, they have also been transplanting adult autologous stem cells, cultured and re-injected into the body shortly after the neck venoplasty. If I chose to go there instead of New York, the procedure would be done at CCSVI Clinic at Noble Hospital in Pune India and I would have to get there essentially as a partially paralyzed patient transported in a wheelchair. There would also be a requirement to stay in the hospital for 10-12 days. But after researching the improvements demonstrated in MS patients in stem cell clinical trials, I simply decided that as long as they would take me, nothing was going to stop me from making that trip. On calls with the clinic, it was also explained that stents were not necessary as the stem cells injected intravenously could be enough to keep my veins from restenosing. My confidence in their method increased when I discovered that Dr. Gupte, the neurosurgeon, had been transplanting autologous stem cells for 4 years for a number of different neurodegenerative conditions, including MS and based his therapies on completed stem cell trial methods done in a number of hospitals and universities outside of the US (to be absolutely sure, I confirmed this through searches on Google Scholar). He had already done over 2000 successful transplants! Regarding my communications with CCSVI Clinic, I need to confess here that we did not tell the doctors the truth originally. My mother, who arranged the treatments, told them that I was an EDSS 6.5 in order to qualify. Basically she knew that they wouldn’t accept me into the program if she said I was higher. But if they saw my actual physical condition could they refuse me on the clinic steps? I hoped not.

    So in late March it was off to India with my father who is a strong man, and my capable assistant. We arrived on March 26, 2012, and met Surjo Banerjee, CCSVI Clinic’s Managing Director at the airport. He drove us from the airport to Pune, a surprisingly modern city just south of Mumbai. I was amazed to see that the hospital and the CCSVI Clinic itself, (a full wing of suites within the hospital complex) was as clean and modern as any hospital here in the States. After checking in with a number of other patients, I was triaged for the procedures. However, based on my new assessment, it was determined that I would need about twice the amount of stem cells that they had originally programmed, figuring my EDSS scale requirement of 6.5. But paying more was out of the question. We are not rich and had basically ‘sold the farm’ to get here in the first place, and the recommended additional stem cells were going to cost another $12,000 that we had not planned for. Not their fault…I didn’t tell them the extent of my condition in the first place. So the first miracle happened when CCSVI Clinic management offered to personally cover these additional costs. I had never even met some of them, but as a result of their generosity, I received an additional 50,000,000 mesenchymal stem cells and I cannot thank them enough for the difference they have made to my life.

    On Tuesday March 27

    , I once again had the liberation therapy followed by the harvesting of red bone marrow cells from my hip bone. The clinic has strict aftercare protocols around each type of procedure with regard to position control and movement. It didn’t much affect my activity because I was unable to move much anyway. I was supine positioned, tilted slightly head high for two days following my venoplasty and then laid out supine again, in just the opposite tilt…head-lower-than-the-body for several days following the transplants of the stem cells. I was told that this would allow the newly transplanted stem cells to filter through the full length of the nervous system and locate to the points of injury. A Doppler ultrasound of my neck veins was done every day for 10 days following my liberation procedure. This was to check for any clotting or re-narrowing of the veins which had been widened. If they clotted or restenosed at any time I was in the clinic, they would take me back into the cathlab for a re-do. Happily this wasn’t necessary.
    Following the liberation therapy, the changes within my body were just as immediate and dramatic as in my first procedure in 2010, hopefully without the fear of re-stenosis; but my ‘headspace’ almost didn’t accept it. The first time with my liberation therapy in the US, the IR found one narrowing in each jugular, the right side being more severe. This time around, two blockages were found on my right side, and again one on the left. I have heard that second and third procedures for venous angioplasty are more difficult for the surgeons because there is more build up of scar tissue in the interior of the veins, but the medical team took their time and did a perfect job. Words cannot express the emotional joy in getting the blood flowing again and getting those symptomatic improvements back a second time!

    Four days later I underwent a lower lumbar puncture, but this time not simply to gather information on whether I have MS. This time, stem cells cultured from my own body were on their way to do what God designed them to do, and that is to heal. For all of you that might be skeptical about this, I am here to tell you that is exactly what they are doing. The positive changes were noticed as soon as I returned to my suite in the clinic and anyone who is paralysed below the waist will understand this next part. To manoeuvre myself as I usually do, I went to pick my leg up from a sitting position and throw it in front of me. The hope here is that the ‘dead-weight’ of the leg will land just right and in a position where I can best situate myself to haul my body into a position where I can further awkwardly throw my whole body into my wheelchair. If you’ve ever seen a spinal patient do this or are unlucky enough to have to do this yourself, you know what an ugly, uncomfortable process this is. But this time the ‘throw’ of the leg proved to be an over-compensation. To my absolute shock and delight my leg lifted itself just as it’s supposed to work…without aid from my helpful hands and placed itself exactly where my brain told it go! At first I didn’t think much of it…this was a fluke, maybe my imagination, but it was something sure not to last. But it has to this day without any hint of regression as I work out and get stronger. This was the first sign of any recovery whatsoever that has occurred below the waist in over ten years, and it happened only hours after the stem cell transplant!

    Upon returning home on April 14, 2012, I closely followed the Clinic’s physiotherapy program. Since then I have been working out at levels I had been told by my doctors here in the states would not be possible again. When exercising before I had stem cell therapy, I always had to be careful not to overdo it because I would get a sickness that sometimes lasted 2 days, completely wiping me out. This even occurred after the first liberation therapy, but no more. I’ve been working myself silly and have not yet felt sick. Real strength has returned and muscles have been popping out in places on my body where I haven’t seen them in many years. As of this writing today, and for about the last two weeks my right hand has been functioning normally in every respect. I’m not saying it has improved some, I’m saying it is now completely NORMAL! I can hardly believe it myself.

    Since I returned, and after only one month, the positive changes have been happening regularly and most every day. Most significantly, I think, my incontinence has completely improved and I am now able to almost totally control my urinary and elimination functions. All other disabilities aside, I think that this is one of the most important deficits that anyone with MS wishes they could get back! Incontinence is so embarrassing and not having control of that particular function somehow makes you feel lesser as a person. So I’m very happy to see the improvements there. My speech is back to normal. Although I never slurred my words, the thought process was oh-so-slow. Now my words come so quickly that I sometimes find myself stumbling over them…trying to say too much at once. I can’t complain about that!

    I am convinced that CCSVI Clinic is on to important discoveries about MS. They have figured this out and are doing the sequence of therapies correctly and the addition of the stem cells completes the need to repair the nerve damage that’s been done by the disease. In retrospect what they are doing suddenly makes complete sense to me. It’s still early yet and I guess time will tell to what extent my motor functions will come back, but if the last month is any indication, it could be everything, which excites me so much. I don’t know if that’s too much to hope for, but it’s the first time in 10 years that I’ve even really allowed the thought to cross my mind. The first fleeting thoughts of this after the original liberation therapy 2 years ago weren’t realistic. The good changes didn’t last. And consider this; a few months ago, I was in a wheelchair, in a permanent brain fog losing more of my independence and quality of life on a daily basis. All I had to look forward to was a deteriorating condition where others would have to take care of my every bodily function. Now I can’t wait to wake up every morning to check myself out. If anything I’m too impatient and working out too hard. But at least I can! Given my current state of health and ability to live and function on my own, the thing that is very certain is that I have a much better quality of life back and that wouldn’t have even been possible if it hadn’t been for the lucky discovery of CCSVI Clinic through an Internet search. My family and I will be eternally grateful for what has happened no matter how this turns out. Thanks to Dr. Gupte, the other doctors, the medical team and staff at the Clinic who made this all happen for me, I’m looking forward to each day with new health and optimism! May God Bless them all!

    I have a long way to go, but as long as my jugular veins are wide open and the stem cells continue to clean up the mess those narrowed veins left behind, and damaged nerves continue to regenerate, I believe the sky is truly the limit! My main focus at this point is not only to rebuild muscle but to get my legs to work together, which will restore my balance.

    Every day is a new gift that allows me more recovery. I can hardly wait for each morning to see the next improvement! There’s so much more happening in my body than I’ve even mentioned in this writing but I hope I’ve related the main message here…MS was my previous diagnosis.

    I will be starting a blog on my progress in a week or two if anyone wants to contact me or follow my improvement. I’m sure there are many of you out there who are skeptical or would want to know how this is going for me. I’ll post the site information back here once I have it up.The first fleeting thoughts of this after the original liberation therapy 2 years ago weren’t realistic. The good changes didn’t last. And consider this; a few months ago, I was in a wheelchair, in a permanent brain fog losing more of my independence and quality of life on a daily basis. All I had to look forward to was a deteriorating condition where others would have to take care of my every bodily function. Now I can’t wait to wake up every morning to check myself out. If anything I’m too impatient and working out too hard. But at least I can! Given my current state of health and ability to live and function on my own, the thing that is very certain is that I have a much better quality of life back and that wouldn’t have even been possible if it hadn’t been for the lucky discovery of CCSVI Clinic through an Internet search. My family and I will be eternally grateful for what has happened no matter how this turns out. Thanks to Dr. Gupte, the other doctors, the medical team and staff at the Clinic who made this all happen for me, I’m looking forward to each day with new health and optimism! May God Bless them all!

    I have a long way to go, but as long as my jugular veins are wide open and the stem cells continue to clean up the mess those narrowed veins left behind, and damaged nerves continue to regenerate, I believe the sky is truly the limit! My main focus at this point is not only to rebuild muscle but to get my legs to work together, which will restore my balance.

    Every day is a new gift that allows me more recovery. I can hardly wait for each morning to see the next improvement! There’s so much more happening in my body than I’ve even mentioned in this writing but I hope I’ve related the main message here…MS was my previous diagnosis.

    I will be starting a blog on my progress in a week or two if anyone wants to contact me or follow my improvement. I’m sure there are many of you out there who are skeptical or would want to know how this is going for me. I’ll post the site information back here once I have it up.For more information visit our site http://davidsmsstemcelljourney.blogspot.in/

    Link to this
  54. 54. messenger 11:56 am 04/17/2014

    It is inspiration and intuition that are at work here and not intellect and interpretation. It is unfortunate that the total aspect of emotion and heart are totally missed. It is with love (for an idea) that opens us to the truth and it is with truth we develop love. It is ok for us to recognize Michael Angelo as great but it is sad to mis-appropriate the church dedicated for the idea of the supreme. It is through heart you reach Him though it through intellectual manifestations you receive Him and His blessings. All art and science still fail to understand the simple truth of integrating heart and mind, emotion and intellect, love and learning because the art and science are still seeing them separate. The duality within us and our thinking needs to mesh before we can see the unity in diversity. He painted intellectual master piece in the church so that we still use love and sacrifice to reach Him even we receive Him through our brain. We need to really stop looking at the negative side and start looking at the inspirational beauty. Rao kotamarti, PhD

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