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"history"66 articles archived since 1845

Battleship Disaster Coverup, 1914

Battleship Disaster Coverup, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: November 28, 1914 On this date 100 years ago Scientific American reported on the sinking of HMS Audacious, one of the British Royal Navy's most modern "dreadnoughts"—the largest and most powerful battleships in existance in 1914.

November 28, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Lawrence in Arabia: from Archaeologist to Spy, 1914

Lawrence in Arabia: from Archaeologist to Spy, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 12, 1914 Here's a short, cryptic note from our December 12, 1914, issue, about scientific work being carried out in the Middle East: "Survey of Southern Palestine.—A considerable amount of surveying and exploration has recently been done along the southern frontier of Palestine under [...]

December 12, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

The Big Guns, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 6, 1915 World War I was an artillery war. Even as new technology—tanks, airplanes, submarines and poison gas—changed the nature of fighting, it was the power of mass manufacturing that had the most profound effect on the conduct of war.

March 6, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
The Zeppelin Earns a Fearsome Reputation, 1915

The Zeppelin Earns a Fearsome Reputation, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 27, 1915 Airships with rigid frames were developed by Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin of Germany starting in the late 19th century.

March 27, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Identity and Meaning in Derby Hats

Last Saturday over 170,000 people descended on Churchill Downs for the 141st Kentucky Derby. The Derby is the first of three races that comprise the American Triple Crown which awards a multi-million dollar purse.

May 8, 2015 — Krystal D'Costa

Heavy Guns Blast Trenches, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: April 17, 1915 World War I was an artillery war. In the opening days, the German army used a new variety of siege gun to blast holes in the Belgian and French forts that had been designed and built—decades earlier—to bar passage.

April 17, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
Blemish: The truth about blackheads

Blemish: The truth about blackheads

Some old wives’ and doctors’ tales are pretty harmless. Behind the myths about blackheads and acne, though, it gets very ugly. And what the truth shows us about how superficial we can be isn’t pretty either.

September 16, 2013 — Hilda Bastian

Rescuing the Drowning Submarine, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: April 10, 1915 The United States submarine F-4 was launched in January 1912, and foundered in March 1915 near Honolulu in 300 feet of water, with the loss of all 21 crew.

April 10, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Italy Is Bribed into War, 1915

Reported in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: June 19, 1915Italy declared war on Austria-Hungary on May 23, 1915. The great hope of the Allies was that an army of more than a million men would be thrown against the Austro-Hungarian troops guarding their southern flank at the northeast corner of Italy.

June 19, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Proud Battleships, Subtle Mines: Dardanelles, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: April 3, 1915 "The day when Constantinople will be covered by the guns of the enemy is not very far distant." That's the ebulliant sentence from the article in Scientific American two weeks before this one, just after the initial British and French attack near [...]

April 3, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Extreme Submarine, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 16, 1915 Before the First World War, Simon Lake designed and built some innovative submarines for the U.S.

January 16, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part III)

An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part III)

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 9, 1915 In this issue of Scientific American from 1915, we published the last installment of a three-part account: "War Experiences of an Air Scout: A Battle in the Clouds," by Frederick C.

January 9, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
An American Pilot at War, 1914 (Part I)

An American Pilot at War, 1914 (Part I)

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 26, 1914 In this issue of Scientific American from 1914, we published the first installment of a three-part first-hand account: "War Experiences of an Air Scout: The Diary of an American Volunteer With the Aviation Corps of the French Army," by Frederick C.

December 26, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

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