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Posts Tagged "aids"

Bering in Mind

Is male circumcision a humanitarian act?

So there’s this fellow—an inquisitive sort, even if not particularly bright—whom one day is asked by his ogress of a wife to drive to the store to buy a ham. Obediently, he does so, finds an impressive specimen of meat at the store, returns home and, grinning widely, places it proudly on the kitchen table [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Tunnels and Bridges Could Help Save Koalas from Extinction

Australia is debating whether or not to list koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) as a threatened or endangered species, and one of the ideas for saving them is to build tunnels to help the marsupials cross under roads without being killed by cars and trucks. We’re used to thinking about koalas living in trees, but they spend [...]

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Food Matters

Beyond medicine: Delivering on the promise of food security in the context of the AIDS epidemic

Facilitating HIV prevention, care, and treatment through dance and drama, TASO, Kampala. Photo Credit: Terrance Roopnaraine

The relationship between HIV/AIDS and food security is incredibly complex. For this guest post, I invited two experts on this issue to share their knowledge, insight, and experience. I’m delighted to introduce the article’s two authors. Suneetha Kadiyala is a Senior Lecturer in nutrition-sensitive development at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), in [...]

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Guest Blog

The Necessity of Humanism

The evil that is in the world always comes of ignorance, and good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence, if they lack understanding.  On the whole, men are more good than bad; that, however, isn’t the real point.  But, they are more or less ignorant, and it is this that we call vice [...]

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Guest Blog

A Journey in Sharing Science: From the Lab to Social Media and Beyond

A few weeks ago, I was graced with an honorary doctorate in social media from Social Media University, Global. My dissertation has been wonderfully received; I have been given high accolades and several once closed opportunities have opened. I have been humbled by the response and am sincerely grateful that people have been touched by [...]

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Guest Blog

Should everyone have access to lifesaving medicines? [Video]

30 minutes, 70 fates. You don’t know it, but as I write this piece, there is some serious procrastination going on. My attention span is weak and sidetracked constantly by a variety of diversions, and if you must know, it’s taken me close to half an hour to write these first two sentences. Still, one [...]

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MIND Guest Blog

Prions May Develop Drug Resistance: The Implications for Mad Cow, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s

The brain of a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob shows signs of neurodegeneration and the presence of  large clumps of prion protein (purple). Courtesy of Lary Walker.

Clumps of proteins twisted into aberrant shapes cause the prion diseases that have perplexed biologists for decades. The surprises just keep coming with a new report that the simple clusters of proteins responsible for Mad Cow and other prions diseases may, without help from DNA or RNA, be capable of changing form to escape the [...]

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Molecules to Medicine

Over-the-counter OraQuick HIV test: What does this mean for you?

The FDA has just announced approval for the OraQuick In-Home HIV test, by OraSure Technologies. That’s great news on some fronts, but the test raises new questions, as well. As I’ve just been catching up on my vacation reading with Marya Zilberberg’s helpful new book, “Between the Lines,” the first thing that caught my eye [...]

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Observations

The Quest: $84,000 Miracle Cure Costs Less Than $150 to Make

What are the likely manufacturing costs for sofosbuvir (Brand name: Sovaldi), the newly approved miracle drug that cures hepatitis C at a cost of $84,000 for the full 12-week course of treatment? Anywhere from $68 to $136 for the full course, according to an analysis that was published in Clinical Infectious Disease (CID) in January—which was [...]

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Observations

Supreme Court Strikes Down Anti-Prostitution Pledge Tied to Global AIDS Funding

supreme-court-breast-cancer

The Supreme Court today struck down a federal requirement that forced private health organizations to denounce prostitution in order to get funding for programs aimed at preventing or treating HIV/AIDS. The decision marks a major victory for human rights and global health advocates who charged that the requirement was a U.S. government overreach that blocked [...]

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Observations

Pediatricians Group Praises Benefits of Circumcision for Male Infants

benefits male newborn circumcision

Evidence for the long-term health benefits of circumcision for newborn boys has been mounting for years. Today the influential group the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) declared that the procedure is, indeed, beneficial—and that it should be covered by public and private health insurance plans. The recommendation was published online August 27 in Pediatrics. Previously [...]

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Observations

How Computers Could Reduce the Spread of HIV

computer model spread hiv prevention program

Condom use, earlier treatment and increased education have gone a long way to reducing HIV spread in the U.S. Nonetheless, some 4,000 inhabitants of New York City still became infected with HIV in 2009. Injection drug users make up a small portion of the new infections (just over 4 percent in NYC, and about 9 percent [...]

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Observations

The Most Exciting Moment of My Scientific Career

HIV,AIDS, Africa

Thumbi Ndung’u left Kenya 1995 to study medicine at Harvard. He later returned to Africa on a mission to exploit HIV’s vulnerabilities. Now the head of the HIV Pathogenesis Program at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa, Ndung’u spoke with Scientific American contributor Brendan Borrell about a research breakthrough early in his career that [...]

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Observations

Jellyfish Genes Make Glow-in-the-Dark Cats

glowing-kitten-next-to-regular-cat

First there were glow-in-the-dark fish, then rats, rabbits, insects, even pigs. And, now, researchers have inserted the jellyfish genes that make fluorescent proteins into Felis catus, or the common household cat. The goal was just to make sure that the researchers could successfully insert novel genes into the cats. Past efforts at cloning and injecting [...]

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Observations

World AIDS Day Marks Progress Toward Prevention

world aids day 2010 december 1 globe with aids awareness ribbon

Wednesday marks the 22nd annual World AIDS Day. In the past year several scientific advances have helped rekindle convictions that progress is being made against the spread of HIV and AIDS. Last week researchers presented findings in The New England Journal of Medicine that prophylactic antiretrovirals—along with counseling and other prevention services—reduced HIV infection rates [...]

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Observations

What does HIV sound like? [Audio]

sounds of hiv dna music album

There is no question that HIV is an ugly virus in terms of human health. Each year, it infects some 2.7 million additional people and leads to some two million deaths from AIDS. But a new album manages to locate some sonic beauty deep in its genome. Sounds of HIV (Azica Records) by composer Alexandra [...]

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Observations

Cheaper treatment for HIV-infected infants could also be more effective

new cheaper drug could help treat HIV infected infants

Babies born to mothers with HIV have a much smaller risk of getting the virus themselves if medical personnel administer preventive drugs, such as nevirapine, at birth to the moms and their newborns. Nevertheless, a small percentage of those infants will end up getting the disease anyway. And without treatment, some 62 percent of HIV-positive [...]

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Observations

Vaginal gel shows effectiveness in preventing HIV in women

hiv cell that might be blocked in half of women using a vaginal microbicide gel

A vaginal microbicide can cut HIV infection rates by 39 percent in women, researchers announced Monday. And female study participants who inserted the gel as directed reduced their chances of contracting HIV by more than half (54 percent). The news is a stunning, positive development— especially for women at risk for sexual transmission—in a field [...]

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PsiVid

David Quammen on SciAm/Read Science! Chat

RS quammen poster

David Quammen, according to his website is  ”an author and journalist whose twelve books include The Song of the Dodo, The Reluctant Mr. Darwin, and most recently Spillover, a work on the science, history, and human impacts of emerging diseases (especially viral diseases).”  I would hope you have read some of his works in any of the many [...]

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PsiVid

OTC HIV Testing Kit Hits Shelves in the US

OTC testing kit for HIV

World AIDS Day is approaching on December 1. As I was looking up more about World AIDS Day and awareness and testing guidelines/suggestions, I discovered there are several other similar days for awareness including National HIV Testing Day (NHTD), June 27, an annual observance to promote HIV testing. There are also days set aside for [...]

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