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A detailed look at the microbes that grow on cheese

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.


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Cheese rinds are actually complex microbial biofilms.

My new lab’s paper is out! I had nothing to do with this work (it was submitted just before I joined), but it’s an incredibly exciting study investigating the diverse microbial communities that grow on cheese rinds. Understanding these communities is not just important for cheese itself, but the study also demonstrated that these microbial communities could serve as a model for addressing broader questions of the interactions between bacteria.

I didn’t do anything for the paper, but I did help put together the video abstract for the paper over at Cell. Check it out!


 

 

Kevin Bonham About the Author: Kevin Bonham is a Curriculum Fellow in the Microbiology and Immunobiology department at Harvard Medical school. He received his PhD from Harvard, where he studied how the cells of the immune system detect the presence of infectious microbes. Find him on Google+, Reddit. Follow on Twitter @Kevbonham.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.






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