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Posts Tagged "wombat"

Extinction Countdown

Dig This: Decline of Australian Digging Mammals Impacts Entire Ecosystems

bandicoot

How much soil would a bandicoot dig if a bandicoot could dig soil? Quite a lot, it turns out. The southern brown bandicoot (Isoodon obesulus) weighs just 1.4 kilograms, but over the course of a year this tiny digging marsupial can excavate more than 3.9 metric tons of soil as it builds its nests and [...]

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Extinction Countdown

An Invasive Plant Is Killing Wombats in Australia

When an otherwise nocturnal wombat shows up in the daylight, acting lethargic and having trouble walking, you know that animal is in trouble. When thousands of wombats turn up sick, emaciated, balding and dying, you know you have a crisis. That’s what’s happening in Murraylands, South Australia, where up to 85 percent of the region’s [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Can the Most Interesting Man in the World Help Save This Critically Endangered Wombat?

most interesting man in the world

Is the northern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus krefftii) the most interesting endangered species in the world? Maybe it is, maybe it isn’t—but it has definitely attracted the attention of the Dos Equis beer commercial spokesperson known only as “the Most Interesting Man in the World.” The television advertising icon and Dos Equis have launched an auction [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Australian mathematicians say some endangered species “not worth saving”

Some endangered species on the brink of extinction might not be worth saving, according to a new algorithm developed by researchers at the University of Adelaide and James Cook University, both in Australia. Dubbed the SAFE (species’ ability to forestall extinction) index, the formula takes current and minimum viable population sizes into account to determine [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Road killed: Australia’s common wombat could soon be uncommon

common wombat

The common wombat (Vombatus ursinus) is, as its name suggests, fairly common in Australia. In fact, the indigenous badgerlike mammal is often considered to be a pest. But widespread species are usually ignored because they are pervasive, and in the case of V. ursinus new research warns that the meter-long marsupials could soon be in [...]

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