ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "sunday snapshot"

Extinction Countdown

Weekend Species Snapshot: Spix’s Macaw

spix's macaw

You or your kids may have seen the fabulous blue macaw in the movie “Rio” or the just-released “Rio 2.” Unfortunately, more people have seen these movies than will ever see the birds in real life. Species name: Spix’s or little blue macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) Where found: Originally native to northeastern Brazil, the only known [...]

Keep reading »
Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Puerto Rican Parrot

Puerto Rican Parrot

The only native parrot species still living in the U.S., these birds nearly went extinct in the second half of the twentieth century. By 1975, only 13 parrots remained. Intense conservation efforts over the past few decades have helped to turn that around, but the species still has a long way to go. Species name: [...]

Keep reading »
Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Goodfellow’s Tree-Kangaroo

Goodfellow's tree-kangaroo

Yes, there are kangaroos that live in trees. Like the famous hoppers of Australia, tree-kangaroos are marsupials. Unlike ground kangaroos, tree-kangaroos are adapted for arboreal life, making them particularly vulnerable to deforestation. Species name: Goodfellow’s tree-kangaroo, a.k.a. the ornate tree-kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi). Where found: The rainforests of Papua New Guinea, mostly in mountain regions. IUCN [...]

Keep reading »
Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Panamanian Golden Frog

panamanian golden frog

These tiny, brightly colored amphibians pack a potent neurotoxin on their skin. That toxin protected them from predators, but it won’t save them from extinction. They haven’t been seen in the wild in seven years. Species name: Panamanian golden frog (Atelopus zeteki). This is actually a misnomer. These “frogs” are actually toads! Where found: The [...]

Keep reading »
Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Blue-Crowned Laughingthrush

Blue-crowned laughingthrush

There isn’t much to laugh about when we’re talking about the blue-crowned laughingthrush. Only about 250 of these rare birds, whose songs sound like human laughter, remain in the wild. Species name: Blue-crowned laughingthrush (Garrulax courtoisi), also known as the Courtois’s laughingbird. The birds have only been recognized as their own species since 2006 (prior [...]

Keep reading »
Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Coquerel’s Sifaka

Coquerel's Sifaka

These medium-sized lemurs, known for their delightful leaping ability, were only recognized as their own species in 2001, which undoubtedly slowed conservation efforts. Species name: Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) Where found: Two “protected” forests in northwest Madagascar: Ankarafantsika National Park and the Bora Special Reserve. In reality, the legal protections the lemurs enjoy in these [...]

Keep reading »
Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Mexican Agouti

Mexican agouti

These large, shy rodents have lost most of their natural habitat to rapid development in their native Mexico. Species name: Mexican agouti (Dasyprocta mexicana). Where found: Southern Mexico, primarily in what’s left of their evergreen and second growth forests. An introduced population also lives in Cuba. Ten other agouti species exist throughout South and Central [...]

Keep reading »
Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Gulf Coast Jaguarundi

jaguarundi

These endangered wild cats, with their distinctively short ears and long tails, aren’t much bigger than your average housecat. Although they have been protected under the U.S. Endangered Species Act since 1976, they have not been confirmed in this country since 1986. Species name: The Gulf Coast jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi cacomitli) Where found: Eastern Mexico [...]

Keep reading »
Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Forest Owlet

forest owlet

Scientific fraud almost led to this tiny owl’s extinction. Species name: Forest owlet (Heteroglaux blewitti). Known locally as dongar dudaa. Where found: About a dozen locations in the forests of central India. The small, stocky bird species went unseen by scientists from 1884 until its rediscovery in 1997, mostly because of a scientific fraud in [...]

Keep reading »
Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Visayan Warty Pig

Visayan Warty Pig

This delightfully ugly, hairy, toothy pig has disappeared from most of its original range. But a few zoos are helping to save it from extinction. Species name: Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons) Where found: Just two islands in the Philippines. They used to be found on six islands, but that’s the way the habitat crumbles. [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Holiday Sale

Give a Gift &
Get a Gift - Free!

Give a 1 year subscription as low as $14.99

Subscribe Now! >

X

Email this Article

X