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Posts Tagged "reintroduction"

Extinction Countdown

Life on the Volcano Is Increasingly Tough for These Hawaiian Birds

palila

You have to hike a pretty long distance if you hope to see the critically endangered bird known as the palila (Loxioides bailleui), but if you’re lucky and work hard, you can walk their entire habitat in a single day. That’s because these beautiful yellow-headed birds live in just one place on Earth: the upper [...]

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Extinction Countdown

A Wild Idea: Save Tasmanian Devils While Controlling Killer Cats

tasmanian devils

Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) disappeared from mainland Australia centuries ago, probably not long after humans first brought dingoes to the continent. A new plan could bring the infamous, snarling predators back from the island of Tasmania to Oz. That would not only benefit the devils, which are dying out due to a communicable cancer, but [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Giant Tusked Insect Saved from Extinction (Just in the Nick of Time)

Motuweta isolata

The Mercury Islands tusked weta (Motuweta isolata) isn’t exactly a thing of beauty. These massive New Zealand insects can reach more than seven centimeters in length, including the impressive tusks in front of their jaws that they use to push their prey around. But size and bullying strength didn’t necessarily help this weta, one of [...]

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Extinction Countdown

First Wild Beaver in 800 Years Confirmed in England? [Video]

eurasian beaver

Few species recoveries have ever been as dramatic as that of the Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber). Once overhunted to near extinction, only 1,200 beavers remained by the year 1900. Today, after more than a century of intense management and reintroductions, the beaver population stands at more than one million (pdf), which can now be found [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Giant Tortoises and Baobab Trees: Imperfect Apart

Aldabra giant tortoise sq

Remove a species from an ecosystem and other species tend to suffer. Take the giant Madagascar tortoise, for example. The two species of giant tortoises on Madagascar went extinct centuries ago, but their loss is still being felt today. According to new research, the extinction of these tortoises robbed one of the island’s iconic baobab [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Britain Tries (Again) to Re-Introduce Extinct Bees

short-haired bee

Long live the queens. A species of bumblebee that went extinct in its native Britain decades ago now has a second chance, as several short-haired bumblebees (Bombus subterraneus) were released June 3 in a restored habitat on the southeastern corner of England. This is the third phase in a multi-step effort to both bring back [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Critically Endangered Parakeet Population Grows on Predator-Free Island Reserve

Malherbe's parakeet

Few people have ever seen a critically endangered Malherbe’s parakeet (Cyanoramphus malherbi) in the wild. Luis Ortiz-Catedral has not only seen more of the birds than just about anyone else, one of them has landed on his head. He has also witnessed something that almost no one else has ever seen among this species: mating. [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Should cheetahs be reintroduced in India?

Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) may be the world’s fastest land mammal, but that hasn’t helped them escape their worst enemy: humans. The big cats have been hunted to extinction in 15 countries, and their remaining African and Asian populations currently face genetic weaknesses, such as low sperm counts and deformed tails, because of inbreeding. Now, controversial [...]

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Not bad science

A Second Day with Social Insects, and Some News on the Bumble Bee Introduced to the UK

The short-haired bumble bee, Bombus subterraneus

After a brilliant first day at the social insect conference held at Royal Holloway, University of London, the second day was also filled with interesting and stimulating talks. Many topics were covered, from foraging strategies in ants, to learning in bees, to cleaner fish and the human sense of unfairness (this was the ‘now for [...]

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