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Posts Tagged "galapagos"

Expeditions

Why is lava shaped like that?

alvin-grabs-lava-sample

Editor’s Note: Journalist and crew member Kathryn Eident is traveling on board the RV Atlantis on a monthlong voyage to explore undersea volcanism in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, among other research projects. This is the third blog post detailing this voyage of discovery for ScientificAmerican.com For geologist Tracy Gregg, exploring submarine volcanoes is a [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Blue-Footed Boobies Have Stopped Breeding—But Why?

Blue-footed-boobie_featured

One of the most delightful bird species of the Galápagos has almost completely stopped breeding there. According to a new study published this week in the journal Avian Conservation and Ecology, blue-footed boobies (Sula nebouxii) have seen a population drop of more than 50 percent over the past two decades. A series of surveys from [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Giant Tortoises and Baobab Trees: Imperfect Apart

Aldabra giant tortoise sq

Remove a species from an ecosystem and other species tend to suffer. Take the giant Madagascar tortoise, for example. The two species of giant tortoises on Madagascar went extinct centuries ago, but their loss is still being felt today. According to new research, the extinction of these tortoises robbed one of the island’s iconic baobab [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Once Extinct in the Wild, Galapagos Giant Tortoises Return to Pinzon Island

pinzon island tortoise adult

Now here’s a great conservation success story: After more than 100 years, Galápagos giant tortoise hatchlings finally have a chance to thrive and survive on their native Pinzón Island, after conservationists cleared it of the invasive rats that nearly wiped out the animals. Like most Galápagos giant tortoises—including the conservation icon Lonesome George, who died [...]

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Extinction Countdown

O’Reilly Animals Enlists Technology Community to Help Save Endangered Species from Extinction

What do the Sumatran tiger, Philippine tarsier, and Galapagos land iguana have in common? They are all endangered or critically endangered species; they have all appeared on the covers of O’Reilly Media’s iconic software manuals; and they are all featured in the publisher’s new O’Reilly Animals campaign, which aims to mobilize the technology community to [...]

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Extinction Countdown

RIP, Lonesome George, the Last-of-His-Kind Galapágos Tortoise

lonesome george

He was the last of his kind and now he is gone. Lonesome George, the world-famous Pinta Island tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra abingdoni) has died in the Galápagos Islands off the coast of Ecuador. George, estimated to be at least 100 years old, was the last known member of his subspecies, and his solitary existence for [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Rat eradication program begins in Galapagos Islands

Rattus rattus

The Galápagos National Park Service has launched a project to protect the famous archipelago’s endangered species by wiping out introduced, invasive rats. As has been done in other locations, such as Australia’s Christmas Island, the Galápagos rats will be targeted with poison bait dropped from helicopters, starting on nine of the chain’s small and medium-sized [...]

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Guest Blog

Evolution isn’t easy, even in Galapagos

175 years and a few months ago a landing party rowed into this little bay. Their ship, a small, storm-weathered British sloop was anchored in the distance. As they approached the shore, a lanky, suntanned, salt-encrusted 26-year-old stepped out with a splash and clambered up onto a jumble of broken basalt. Charles Darwin had arrived [...]

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Observations

Lonesome George, the Iconic Galápagos Tortoise, Gets Prepared for Taxidermy [Video]

Lonesome George in his pen, May 3, 2011

Lonesome George checks out a keeper in his Galápagos pen, May 3, 2011–a year before he died. Credit: Philip Yam The world’s most famous tortoise will soon make a return to public display—in mounted form. The last of his species, Lonesome George was an icon for conservation and evolution. He was found alone on Pinta [...]

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