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Posts Tagged "gabon"

Extinction Countdown

Slaughtered for Ivory: 65 Percent of Forest Elephants Killed Since 2002

forest elephants

It just gets worse and worse. Last year a shocking study revealed that 62 percent of the world’s forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis) had been killed by poachers between 2002 and 2011. Now a new update adds data from 2012 and 2013, finding that a total of 65 percent of the species has now been slaughtered [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Poachers Have Killed 62 Percent of Forest Elephants in the Past Decade

forest elephant ivory

Central Africa has become increasingly inhospitable to forest elephants, according to a study published March 4 in PLoS One that found that 62 percent of the species was killed by poachers between 2002 and 2011. The study—by scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and more than a dozen other institutions—also found that 30 percent [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Massive Ivory Burn in Gabon Sends Message to Elephant Poachers

gabon ivory stockpile burn

Ivory to ashes, tusks to dust…. Nearly 5,000 kilograms of elephant tusks and ivory carvings went up in flames on Wednesday in the west African nation of Gabon, sending a powerful message to the international community that poaching and wildlife crime will no longer be tolerated in that country. “Gabon has a policy of zero [...]

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Guest Blog

Nature’s Nuclear Reactors: The 2-Billion-Year-Old Natural Fission Reactors in Gabon, Western Africa

Two billion years ago— eons before humans developed the first commercial nuclear power plants in the 1950s— seventeen natural nuclear fission reactors operated in what is today known as Gabon in Western Africa [Figures 1 and 2]. The energy produced by these natural nuclear reactors was modest. The average power output of the Gabon reactors [...]

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