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Posts Tagged "frogs"

Anecdotes from the Archive

Frog briefly gets a leg up on entertainment industry

5 legged frog

Mr. Jacob Stauffer, a naturalist from Lancaster, Pa., sent in this drawing of a five legged frog that was captured in Conestoga, Pa (near Lancaster). It was featured in the September 13, 1879 issue of Scientific American. The extra leg seemed to be a fusion of two hind legs rather than a full-grown independent limb. [...]

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Extinction Countdown

14 New Species of Endangered “Dancing” Frogs Discovered in India [Video]

dancing frog

Say “Hello, my baby. Hello, my darling…” to 14 newly described frog species that kick and dance like Michigan J. Frog from the classic Warner Brothers animated cartoon, One Froggy Evening. These “dancing” frogs don’t sing, however—the males of these various species all kick and stretch their legs to their sides as a visual cue [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Panamanian Golden Frog

panamanian golden frog

These tiny, brightly colored amphibians pack a potent neurotoxin on their skin. That toxin protected them from predators, but it won’t save them from extinction. They haven’t been seen in the wild in seven years. Species name: Panamanian golden frog (Atelopus zeteki). This is actually a misnomer. These “frogs” are actually toads! Where found: The [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Squeaking By: Frog Species Rediscovered in Ghana, but Invasive Devil Weed Threatens Its Survival

Arthroleptis krokosua

It took four years, nine people and countless man-hours, but a team of scientists has finally rediscovered the “giant” Krokosua squeaker frog (Arthroleptis krokosua), a critically endangered species that has not been seen in its native Ghana since 2009. Unfortunately the Sui River Forest Reserve, where a single adult frog was found earlier this month, [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Good Dads Help Rare Haitian Frogs Breed in Captivity

La Hotte land frog

It requires a great deal of patience and more than a few days to get to the few remaining habitats of the La Hotte land frog (Eleutherodactylus bakeri) in Haiti. First you rent a pickup truck in Port-au-Prince. Then you drive 11 hours west down the Tiburon Peninsula. At one point the road passes through [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Weird Frog Discovered by Charles Darwin May Be Extinct

southern darwin's frog

It looks like we’ve lost another one. The weird and unusual Chile Darwin’s frog (Rhinoderma rufum), whose tadpoles grew inside the vocal sacs of adult males, appears to be extinct: a four-year quest failed to turn up any evidence that the species still exists. The frogs were last seen in 1980. As you might guess [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Extinct Frog Rediscovered in 2011; World Takes Notice in 2013

hula painted frog

What was once lost has now been found. Well, it was actually found about a year and a half ago, but most people just seem to be noticing now. The Hula painted frog was probably never common. The species, native to just a few small habitats in Israel, was only recorded by scientists on a [...]

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Extinction Countdown

The Last 50 Corroboree Frogs and Other Links from the Brink

southern corroboree frog

A colorful frog, some Hawaiian mollusks and California’s threatened fish are among the endangered species in the news this week. The Frog Extinction Crisis Continues: How much longer until we have to say good-bye to the southern corroboree frog (Pseudophryne corroboree)? The rare Australian amphibian, one of the world’s most colorful and well-known endangered species, [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Amphibians in U.S. Declining at “Alarming and Rapid Rate”

yellow-legged frog

A new study finds that frogs, toads, salamanders and other amphibians in the U.S. are dying off so quickly that they could disappear from half of their habitats in the next 20 years. For some of the more endangered species, they could lose half of their habitats in as little as six years. The nine-year [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Massacred Elephants, Found Frogs and Other Links from the Brink

Dzanga Bai elephants

Elephants, turtles, grizzly bears and some of the world’s rarest frogs are among the endangered species in the news this week. Worst News of the Week: Armed gunmen entered the Dzanga Bai World Heritage Site in the violence-plagued Central African Republic this week and slaughtered at least 26 elephants. The site is known as the [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Slaughtered Rhinos, Vanishing Cheetahs, the Lonely Dodo and Other Links from the Brink

cheetah

Rhinos, cheetahs, gray wolves and frogs are among the endangered species in the news this week. Worst News of the Week: All of the rhinos in Mozambique’s Limpopo National Park have been completely wiped out by poachers, who are now turning their effort to the park’s elephants. The 1.1 million hectare park is the size [...]

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Image of the Week

Tragically Beautiful

DFA186: Hadēs by Brandon Ballengée

Source: ScienceArt On View in March/April 2014 on Symbiartic Populations of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians are rapidly declining worldwide, and those that remain are increasingly falling victim to environmental pollutants that cause deformities such as extra limbs and ambiguous sexual organs. Brandon Ballengée’s work aims to draw attention to their plight through visually arresting [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Karl Shuker’s The Encyclopaedia of New and Rediscovered Animals

We’re all excited by, and interested in, ‘new’ species; that is, those that have been discovered and named within recent years, with “recent years” variously being considered synonymous with “since 2000”, “since the 1970s”, or “since 1899/1900”. In the modern age, species discovered within the 20th century are generally considered ‘surprising’ and ‘recent’, and we [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Everybody loves glassfrogs

Glassfrogs (or centrolenids) are a really interesting but comparatively little known group of anurans, you might have heard of them. Ha ha, just kidding – you know them well already since they were recently covered at reasonable length here at Tet Zoo. Since that article went live, I’ve been talking with glassfrog expert Juan Manuel [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Glassfrogs: translucent skin, green bones, arm spines

Glassfrogs, or centrolenids, are wide-skulled, long-limbed arboreal little frogs (SVL 20-60 mm), unique to the Central and South American cloud and rain forests. Not until 1951 did this group get recognised as a distinct and nameable entity: prior to this, species within the group (known to science since 1872) had been classified as part of [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

The New Forest Reptile Centre

Back in May this year I visited the New Forest Reptile Centre (Holidays Hill, near Lyndhurst, New Forest National Park, Hampshire, UK). I’ve been meaning to visit for a long time – I think I last went there some time during the late 1990s – and the very hot and sunny weather meant that it [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

In pursuit of Romanian frogs (part III: brown frogs)

Time to look at more of the frogs I encountered in Romania. In the previous article I discussed Western Palaearctic water frogs (the species of Pelophylax). Here in Europe, water frogs live alongside another group of ranid frogs – the brown frogs, the only frogs unambiguously and unquestionably associated with the generic name Rana. Well, [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

In pursuit of Romanian frogs (part II: WESTERN PALAEARCTIC WATER FROGS!!)

As you’ll recall if you read my recent article on Yellow-bellied toads Bombina variegata you’ll know that I recently wandered about the Romanian countryside, hunting for frogs. You can never have too many frogs and, these days – what with the global amphibian crisis and all – you typically don’t. The good news is that [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

In pursuit of Romanian frogs (part I: Bombina)

I recently spent a bit of time in Romania, working with colleagues in an effort to find new Cretaceous reptile fossils. As usual, I can’t talk about what we found (yet. And we did find a lot). But what I can talk about is the modern-day wildlife I encountered while on the trip. Partly due [...]

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