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"extinction"24 articles archived since 1845

Science and Art Exhibits To Launch 2015

The number of exhibits combining science and art in some capacity has grown steadily since I began blogging about them in 2011. With exhibits in galleries and museums across the country, there’s something for everyone.

January 12, 2015 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Scatter, Adapt, and Remember

Scatter, Adapt, and Remember

“If you think Humans are destroying the planet in a way that’s historically unprecedented, you’re suffering from a species-level delusions of grandeur.” -Annalee Newitz, Scatter Adapt, and Remember Perhaps it’s having a 3 month old baby in the house (our second), but I’ve been thinking about the apocalypse more than normal.

April 30, 2014 — Glendon Mellow
Giant Tortoises and Baobab Trees: Imperfect Apart

Giant Tortoises and Baobab Trees: Imperfect Apart

Remove a species from an ecosystem and other species tend to suffer. Take the giant Madagascar tortoise, for example. The two species of giant tortoises on Madagascar went extinct centuries ago, but their loss is still being felt today.

August 13, 2013 — John R. Platt
100 Years Ago Today

100 Years Ago Today

Today marks a sad centennial: the 100th anniversary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius), a species once so abundant that their flocks blacked out the skies of North America.

September 1, 2014 — John R. Platt

If Apes Go Extinct, So Could Entire Forests

Bonobo poop matters. Well, maybe not the poop itself, but what's in it. You see, bonobos eat a lot of fruit, and fruit contains seeds. Those seeds travel through a bonobo's digestive system while the bonobo itself travels through the landscape.

March 11, 2015 — John R. Platt
Fresh Start for an Extinct Cat?

Fresh Start for an Extinct Cat?

Credit: An 1862 painting of a Formosan clouded leopard by Joseph Wolf, image in the public domain Source: from Could Extinct Clouded Leopards Be Reintroduced in Taiwan?

December 26, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios
#MapMonday: Biodiversity Map Shows Hemorrhaging of Species

#MapMonday: Biodiversity Map Shows Hemorrhaging of Species

For this #MapMonday we return to Yale's Environmental Performance group, featured previously here on #MapMonday. The newly released biodiversity map brings together a whopping amount of data to detail the state (quality not just quantity) of species around the world, and while the staggering diversity of life on our planet is breathtaking (and sometimes pretty [...]

December 8, 2014 — Tali Trigg

The Unstoppable Extinction And Fermi’s Paradox

There has been a lot of discussion recently about the evidence that we are currently within a period of mass extinction, the kind of event that will show up in the fossil record a few million years from now as a clear discontinuity, a radical change in the diversity of life on the planet.

March 20, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf

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