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Expeditions

Guam and Palau Wrap Up: Another Successful Field Course Comes to an End

Close encounter with a Manta Ray in German Channel. Image: David Ginsburg

Recently, the 2013 Guam and Palau course came to a close. This is the fourth year that my co-instructor Jim Haw and I have run the program, which was offered for the first time in 2010. Since then, we have accompanied nearly 100 undergraduate students to Micronesia to investigate marine and coastal ecosystems (see link [...]

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Expeditions

Southern California and Endangered Abalone Populations

Abalone range in size from 5-12 inches in length and are found in coastal waters. Image: NOAA photo library.

By Megan Herring Southern California’s beaches, sun, tranquility, and other resources makes it a prime area for people looking for a new place to plant roots and make their fortune. For this reason, California has seen a rapid growth in population and commerce, which has led to a number of positive effects on the California [...]

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Expeditions

The Historical Collapse of Southern California Fisheries and the Rocky Future of Seafood

Example of an Abalone shell. Source: Mynzah.com

By Katie Lee Recently, the New York Times Green Blog described how two major Southern California fisheries (kelp and barred sand bass) had collapsed “right under the noses of management agencies.” The management and oversight of these fish stocks had not changed since 1959. This news is perhaps not surprising as there are more examples [...]

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Expeditions

Hyperbaric Oxygen: A Spectrum of Emerging Treatments

(A) Physical lesion at presentation; (B) worsening of lesions after 1 month of treatment; and (C) complete resolution of necrotic lesions after 1 month of HBOT (Gurgo et al., 2011).

By Nathalie Sami and Janice Wong Certified scuba divers are familiar with the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for decompression sickness treatment. However, in the past 50 years, researchers have revealed HBOT’s broad applications to human physiology and medicine. The outlook for HBOT applications for treating wounds, neurological diseases, and even certain cancers appears [...]

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Expeditions

Challenges Facing Japan’s Marine Fisheries

A chef poses with the head of the $1.76 million tuna auctioned off in Tokyo in January (Kimimasa Mayama / EPA 2013).

by Molly Sullivan For thousands of years, the sea has served Japan as a cultural and economic resource. The Japanese have made heavy use of the ocean surrounding their island nation, harvesting a host of marine organisms from sea cucumbers to whales.  However, in recent decades the ocean has become a resource at risk, with [...]

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Expeditions

Military Buildup’s Environmental Takedown

Construction near Apra Harbor, Guam. Construction threatens the diverse marine species that live in the harbor as well as creates more waste that has no place to be treated or disposed of. Photo credit: Laurie Raymundo http://www.wri.org/publication/reefs-at-risk-revisited/stories/guam

By: Juliana Duran Guam, a US territory, is an island that is no stranger to war or military presence. It first came under US control after the Spanish-American war. However, during WWII, after Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Japanese invaded and occupied Guam.  Ultimately, American forces retook the island, and following the war Guam was [...]

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Expeditions

Okinawa and the U.S. military, post 1945

Figure 1: Protest at Kadena Air Base: In 1987, a protest outside of the Kadena Air Base comprised of 24,000 people as a human chain demanding for the closure of the base. Okinawan resentment increased as U.S. military bases we not reduced following Okinawa’s return to Japanese control.

By Lane Johnston Okinawa has had a tumultuous history and a scattered identity throughout the twentieth century. As a Japanese territory before World War II, Okinawans did not ever fully adopted Japanese culture as their own. During WWII, Okinawa was a major location used in the U.S. military’s island-hopping towards mainland Japan. After the Battle [...]

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Expeditions

Effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas in Mexico – the Actam Chuleb Example

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By Alanna Waldman As our world population continues to grow, it implies a higher demand for resources. Whether these resources are food, water, or land, the effect of this growth on our environment is often detrimental to biodiversity and the health of our natural ecosystems, especially our marine ecosystems. The ocean covers 71% of the [...]

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Expeditions

The lost cousins of Homo sapiens in Asia and the South Pacific

Possible routes of evolution for Homo floresiensis (Baab)

By Paige Minteer The evolution of humans is the result of a number of speciation events that have built upon one another to create the modern-day human species: Homo sapiens. Humans are believed to have evolved from a line of ancestors dating millions of years ago and originating in Africa.  The subsequent Homo sapien ancestors [...]

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Expeditions

A Persistent Case of Diabetes Mellitus in Guam

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By Amanda Ungco Proud of their culture and successes, Americans have soaked up the American dream and have broadened their wings to influence the rest of the world. Many of these influences manifest themselves as good deeds, bringing students, volunteers and various charity organizations to third world countries in an attempt to better the universal [...]

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