ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "ships"

Anecdotes from the Archive

2 Ships Passing in the Fog: 35 Years before the Titanic, Uneasy Sailing on the White Star Line

celtic

When most people think of famous ship accidents, the first that comes to mind is often the RMS Titanic, which sank on April 15, 1912. This was not the first accident involving a White Star liner, however. One hundred thirty-six years ago, two White Star line steamers collided off the U.S. coast near New York [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

To Hades and Back: Nereus Lost

The hybrid remotely operated vehicle (HROV) Nereus during a dip test in Auckland Harbor in April prior to departure. (Photo by Ken Kostel, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

ABOARD THE R/V THOMAS G. THOMPSON—In the early morning hours of Saturday, May 10, we were on the seafloor in the deepest part of the Kermadec Trench when all of the video screens in the Nereus control room went dark. That wasn’t unusual, but it did signal a premature end to our 7-hour dive to [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

To Hades and Back: Snailfish Surprise in the Kermadec Trench

ABOARD THE R/V THOMAS G. THOMPSON—On the scale of the Pacific Ocean, the Kermadec Trench looks like a thin line snaking down from southwest to northeast just off the northeastern tip of New Zealand’s North Island. But when you zoom in and look even at the coarse detail that the ship’s multi-beam sonar can reveal, [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

To Hades and Back: One Trench Among Many

Nereus returns to the deck of the Thomas G. Thompson from a dive. (Photo by Ken Kostel, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

ABOARD THE R/V THOMAS G. THOMPSON—Challenger Deep is the deepest spot in the ocean—that we know of, at least. The seafloor is so poorly mapped that there could easily be something deeper out there, but that’s not all that important to us. It’s been visited many times by both human-occupied and remotely operated vehicles, including [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

To Hades and Back: Feeding Frenzies of the Deep

Chimera_feat

ABOARD THE R/V THOMAS G. THOMPSON—While waiting for the weather to die down and for solutions to problems with our winch and the vehicle, the rest of our non-Nereus science program has continued. We have put both of the landers and the fish trap in the water almost every day so far at varying depths [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

To Hades and Back: Under the Weather

The R/V Thomas G. Thompson holding station over Maug caldera in 2004. / Credit: NOAA.

ABOARD THE R/V THOMAS G. THOMPSON—Our operations have been halted for a second day now while we wait for a storm on the other side of New Zealand to spin itself out. With no samples to process, many of us took a day off to catch up on reading or, for some of the undergraduates [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

To Hades and Back: Exploring the Deepest Part of the Ocean

The hybrid remotely operated vehicle (HROV) Nereus during a dip test in Auckland Harbor in April prior to departure. (Photo by Ken Kostel, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Humans have been to every corner of the planet and built either an Internet café or a Starbucks in almost every city. You can find plastic in the middle of the ocean and Mt. Everest base camp is a vast rubbish heap. Satellites monitor virtually every square meter of Earth every day and Google has [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

Jumborizing: a brief history of the R/V Knorr

In the library here, there’s a fabulous oil painting of Ernest R. Knorr, an engineer and cartographer after whom our boat is named. Since her first launch in 1968, the Knorr has logged over a million miles, sailing far enough to go the the moon and back twice.   You’ve seen parts of the boat, [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

All Aboard: how you can be a part of our research blog

Hi there! I’m Rose, a science journalist and producer. I live in Brooklyn now, where I write, produce and generally try to explain science-y things. But in a few weeks, I’ll be writing to you from somewhere far, far away from Brooklyn: the North Atlantic Ocean. I’m heading out to sea with a research group [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Holiday Sale

Give a Gift &
Get a Gift - Free!

Give a 1 year subscription as low as $14.99

Subscribe Now! >

X

Email this Article

X