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Posts Tagged "alaska"

Anthropology in Practice

Editor’s Selections: Warring Incans, Deception, and the Alaskan Highway

Ed Note: Part of my online life includes editorial duties at ResearchBlogging.org, where I serve as the Social Sciences Editor. Each Thursday, I pick notable posts on research in anthropology, philosophy, social science, and research to share on the ResearchBlogging.org News site. To help highlight this writing, I also share my selections here on AiP. [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Mystery of Alaskan “Goo” Rust Solved at Last

rust_spores_alaska_noaa_200

Last fall the small Alaskan coastal village of Kivalina was inundated by a mysterious orange “goo”(click for photo). Locals and others suspected a toxic algal bloom (see here for image), or perhaps some sort of chemical release, or millions of microscopic “crustacean eggs”. Yet just a month later the mystery substance was identified as none [...]

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Expeditions

Ode to the lowly tussock

Tussocks blooming by Horn Lake on Alaska

Editor’s Note: Vienna, Austria-based science writer Chelsea Wald is taking part in a two-week Marine Biological Laboratory journalism fellowship at Toolik Field Station, an environmental research post inside the Arctic Circle. To see the current conditions in Toolik, check out the Webcam. Walking over Eriophorum, Watch your step of you’ll fall off ‘em. –Benjamin Shaw, [...]

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Expeditions

Adventures in Alaskan science: How I escaped from a thermokarst

Scientists Mike Gooseff shoveling the blogger out of a thermokarst

Editor’s Note: Vienna, Austria-based science writer Chelsea Wald is taking part in a two-week Marine Biological Laboratory journalism fellowship at Toolik Field Station, an environmental research post inside the Arctic circle. To see the current conditions in Toolik, check out the Webcam. I was nearly eaten by a thermokarst. I just stepped in and, before [...]

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Expeditions

Alaskan science on the solstice: Doing research where the sun never sets

graphic showing how Earth

Editor’s Note: Vienna, Austria-based science writer Chelsea Wald is taking part in a two-week Marine Biological Laboratory journalism fellowship at Toolik Field Station, an environmental research post inside the Arctic circle. To see the current conditions in Toolik, check out the Webcam. I packed my flashlight. That’s really stupid. I’m above the Arctic Circle near [...]

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Expeditions

Science, pipelines and bears: A reporter goes to Alaska’s Toolik Field Station

Toolik camp, 1980

Editor’s Note: Vienna, Austria-based science writer Chelsea Wald is taking part in a two-week Marine Biological Laboratory journalism fellowship at Toolik Field Station, an environmental research post inside the Arctic circle. To see the current conditions in Toolik, check out the Webcam. VIENNA, AUSTRIA, June 14, 2010—It just dawned on me that in two days [...]

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Extinction Countdown

25 Years after Exxon Valdez Spill, Sea Otters Recovered in Alaska’s Prince William Sound

sea otter

It took a quarter century, but the northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) living in Alaska’s Prince William Sound have finally recovered from the effects of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, according to a new report from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The spill itself killed an estimated 40 percent of the 6,500 sea [...]

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Plugged In

The Cold Rush: An Effort to Protect the Arctic from Oil Spills During Rapid Development

On May 15th, the U.S. was given an assignment to create a contingency plan for oil and gas spills in the Arctic. Seven other Arctic Council nations – Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia and Sweden – have to do the same. The need for such a strategy first surfaced due to the Macondo blowout [...]

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