ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network
Doing Good Science

Doing Good Science


Building knowledge, training new scientists, sharing a world.
Doing Good Science HomeAboutContact
  • Profile

    Janet D. Stemwedel Janet D. Stemwedel is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at San José State University. Her explorations of ethics, scientific knowledge-building, and how they are intertwined are informed by her misspent scientific youth as a physical chemist. Follow on Twitter @docfreeride.
  • Blogroll

  • A guide for science guys trying to understand the fuss about that shirt.

    composite-square-02

    This is a companion to the last post, focused more specifically on the the question of how men in science who don’t really get what the fuss over Rosetta mission Project Scientist Matt Taylor’s shirt was about could get a better understanding of the objections — and of why they might care. (If the story [...]

    Keep reading »

    The Rosetta mission #shirtstorm was never just about that shirt.

    composite-square-01

    Last week, the European Space Agency’s Spacecraft Rosetta put a washing machine-sized lander named Philae on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Landing anything on a comet is a pretty amazing feat, so plenty of scientists and science-fans were glued to their computers watching for reports of the Rosetta mission’s progress. During the course of the interviews streamed to [...]

    Keep reading »

    Mentoring new scientists in the space between how things are and how things ought to be.

    composite-square-02

    Scientists mentoring trainees often work very hard to help their trainees grasp what they need to know not only to build new knowledge, but also to succeed in the context of a career landscape where score is kept and scarce resources are distributed on the basis of scorekeeping. Many focus their protégés’ attention on the [...]

    Keep reading »

    Ebola, abundant caution, and sharing a world.

    composite-square-01

    Today a judge in Maine ruled that quarantining nurse Kaci Hickox is not necessary to protect the public from Ebola. Hickox, who had been in Sierra Leone for a month helping to treat people infected with Ebola, had earlier been subject to a mandatory quarantine in New Jersey upon her return to the U.S., despite [...]

    Keep reading »

    You’re not rehabilitated if you keep deceiving.

    composite-square-02

    Regular readers will know that I view scientific misconduct as a serious harm to both the body of scientific knowledge and the scientific community involved in building that knowledge. I also hold out hope that at least some of the scientists who commit scientific misconduct can be rehabilitated (and I’ve noted that other members of [...]

    Keep reading »

    Grappling with the angry-making history of human subjects research, because we need to.

    composite-square-01

    Teaching about the history of scientific research with human subjects bums me out. Indeed, I get fairly regular indications from students in my “Ethics in Science” course that reading about and discussing the Nazi medical experiments and the U.S. Public Health Service’s Tuskegee syphilis experiment leaves them feeling grumpy, too. Their grumpiness varies a bit [...]

    Keep reading »

    Adjudicating “misbehavior”: how can scientists respond when they don’t get fair credit?

    composite-square-02

    As I mentioned in an earlier post, I recently gave a talk at UC – Berkeley’s Science Leadership and Management (SLAM) seminar series. After the talk (titled “The grad student, the science fair, the reporter, and the lionfish: a case study of competition, credit, and communication of science to the public”), there was a discussion [...]

    Keep reading »

    Communicating with the public, being out as a scientist.

    composite-square-01

    In the previous post, I noted that scientists are not always directly engaged in the project of communicating about their scientific findings (or about the methods they used to produce those findings) to the public. Part of this is a matter of incentives: most scientists don’t have communicating with the public as an explicit part [...]

    Keep reading »

    Are scientists who don’t engage with the public obliged to engage with the press?

    composite-square-02

    In posts of yore, we’ve had occasion to discuss the duties scientists may have to the non-scientists with whom they share a world. One of these is the duty to share the knowledge they’ve built with the public — especially if that knowledge is essential to the public’s ability to navigate pressing problems, or if [...]

    Keep reading »

    Doing science is more than building knowledge: on professional development in graduate training.

    composite-square-01

    Earlier this week, I was pleased to be an invited speaker at UC – Berkeley’s Science Leadership and Management (SLAM) seminar series. Here’s the official description of the program: What is SLAM? Grad school is a great place to gain scientific expertise – but that’s hardly the only thing you’ll need in your future as [...]

    Keep reading »

    Search this blog:


    • Year:
    • Month:
    • Keyword:

    More from Scientific American

    Scientific American Holiday Sale

    Black Friday/Cyber Monday Blow-Out Sale

    Enter code:
    HOLIDAY 2014
    at checkout

    Get 20% off now! >

    X

    Email this Article

    X