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Posts Tagged "Twitter"

Anthropology in Practice

Why is the grass always greener on social media?

Image by Kitty Terwolbeck. Used without alteration. Click on image for license and information.

Are you on social media? I’m willing to bet you’re on at least one channel (and it’s probably Facebook). In December 2013, 73% of adults online were using a social networking site of some sort. You’re a part of that number. And as our world grows increasingly connected, and the need and ability to share [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

What Differentiates a Twitter Mob from a Twitter Mob?

What defines a mob? | Image by jinterwas, CC.

Brevity may be the soul of wit, but what does wit matter if no one’s listening? On Twitter the potential exists for many people to listen even if they aren’t connected. The reach of Twitter creates the possibility of a shared experience that extends well beyond the immediate network of a user: When the Japanese [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

What does it mean when we need to take a break from Facebook?

Recently a friend of mine posted that she was closing her Facebook account. She isn’t sure that she will return to the land of vacation photos and passive-aggressive banter. Her decision was fueled by a few factors: concerns about privacy, non-stop requests to play Candy Crush Saga, and status updates that she perceived as inane [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Scientific American Mind Is Now on Facebook

And…We’re live! This week, Scientific American Mind launched its Facebook page. Join us here to stay up to date on our latest articles on the mind and brain. Read, share, comment—we are keen for your feedback. Fashionably late, you say? Allow me to take a step back to explain. When I was in journalism school, [...]

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Dog Spies

Being Man’s Best Friend’s Best Friend

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Let’s pretend you and I meet at a ‘Spring is finally here!’ potluck in the park. You: Hi! Me: Hi! After exchanging niceties about your horrible subway ride (mine wasn’t so bad), you mention you work in (fill in the blank), and we chat about how crazy (fill in the blank) has become. You ask [...]

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Dog Spies

Canine Urination 101: Handstands and Leg Lifts Are Just the Basics

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As my Twitter bio says, I’m interested in your dog’s urine. I’m not kidding around here. For a recent Animal Behavior class, I buddied up with a doggie daycare and followed dogs on their afternoon walks. Yes. I was that person walking around NYC with a hand held camera, trailing dogs and video taping them as [...]

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Guest Blog

Social media for science: The geologic perspective

Last week, I spent a pleasant hour over lunch talking to my 60-year-old aunt and her 80-something husband about "this Twitter thing" and how one defines a blog. They had heard that social media had played a role in the protests in Egypt and wanted to learn more. Good students, they nodded and asked questions [...]

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Image of the Week

Drown Your Town

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From: Drown Your Town: what does your hometown look like with sea level rise? by David Wogan at Plugged In. Source: Andrew David Thaler Amid a couple of harrowing weeks in the science blogging community, a madcap and dastardly plan was hatched by the Southern Fried Scientist, Andrew David Thaler. Using Google Maps and a [...]

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Information Culture

More about altmetrics

When in trouble or in doubt, invent new words. We have bibliometrics and scientometrics from the Age of Print. Now they are joined by informetrics, cybermetrics, webometrics and altmetrics, which might not be an accurate term, but it’s sticky (more than social media-based complimentary metrics, that’s for sure). Between the PLoS journals’ Article-Level-Metrics (ALM), Nature [...]

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Life, Unbounded

Tweets In Space!

Tweets In Space (N. Stern and S. Kildall)

When the interplanetary missions Pioneer 10 and 11 launched in the late 1970s they each carried a metal plaque engraved with a set of pictorial messages from humanity. Eventually these extraordinary probes will traverse interstellar space, carrying these hopeful symbols towards anyone, or anything, that might one day find them. A few years later also [...]

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Observations

Boston Marathon Calamity Shows Value of Social Media

It might be no surprise that immediately after the explosions at today’s Boston Marathon, social media sites became the best way for the public to obtain on-the-scene reports. But notably, it also became the best way for classic news media to report. Even more than that, the long minutes after the news broke showed just [...]

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Observations

Lonely Planet: Social Media Gets on Board in the Quixotic Search for Extraterrestrial Life

The count of exoplanets, those outside the Solar System, now has reached the multi-hundreds, with mucho mas inevitably to be counted. Working through financial troubles, SETI is again searching for intelligent life in the great Out There. So paraphrasing the relevant question posed by Enrico Fermi: If they’re out there, why aren’t they here? The [...]

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Observations

Silicon Valley Innovators Share Their Vision of the Future

SAN FRANCISCO—How will ubiquitous connectivity and social media change everything? That, in short, was what a number of luminaries in the tech world addressed yesterday at the GigaOM roadmap conference. Rather than bore you with an extended recap, I thought I’d share some of the most salient nuggets of wisdom. I’ve made every effort to [...]

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Observations

GOP Candidate Jon Huntsman Makes Waves with Tweet on Evolution and Climate Change

Jon Huntsman posted a statement on his official Twitter account yesterday that is sure to endear the Republican presidential hopeful to the scientific community: The statement was retweeted widely, along with a few warnings that many people would, indeed, call Huntsman crazy for holding those beliefs. (I retweeted it myself, not as a political endorsement [...]

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Observations

Twitter Helped Doctors Tell Patients Where to Get Meds After Japan Earthquake

twitter helped doctors get drugs to patients after japan earthquake tsunami

In the hours after the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and massive tsunami hit Japan in March, essential infrastructure and communication were cut off, leaving many of the disasters’ survivors without access to phones, electricity or water. And those who were on essential medications were on the cusp of losing their lifelines, too. "The secondary disaster is [...]

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Observations

Keep it fun, simple and social, says Twitter ex-developer and user no. 9

Sagolla,Idea Festival,Twitter

LOUISVILLE, Ky.—In any given second, an average of 600 Twitter messages ("tweets") are sent. The secret to its success: it’s fun, simple and social—a set of criteria that all entrepreneurs should keep in mind when pursuing their ideas, Dom Sagolla said here Friday at Idea Festival. Twitter‘s 140-character constraint has been crucial to the service’s [...]

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Plugged In

The Earthquake App — circa 1859

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Okay, so we all had a swell time: the floor starts jiggling like a jello-mold, and those of us who didn’t run outside ran to Twitter, and it was on. Within seconds we were linking to the USGS site, the sites for the impenetrable Richter Scale and the simple, purely descriptive Modified Mercalli Scale (“III. Vibrations similar [...]

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PsySociety

Knowledge, Knowledge Everywhere: Do Social Networks Spread or Drown Health & Science News?

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We live in an age of constant data. Between television, the Internet, and  our “real-life” social circles, society has never before had as much access to health and science news as we now enjoy — and it has never been so easy for anyone to access an entire encyclopedia of information about any health or [...]

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PsySociety

Outside the Ivory Tower: Science Writing, Social Media, and Non-Painful Networking.

SciAmBloggers

On Friday, I was invited by a friend at Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington to give a talk to an undergraduate colloquium about Science Writing/Blogging and how students might be able to pursue it as a potential career path. As part of the talk, I was asked to share details about my personal experience (how [...]

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PsySociety

Weiner’s Wiener? Too perfect to be a coincidence.

AnthonyWeiner

In case you haven’t heard, Carlos Danger — AKA shamed former New York Congressman Anthony Weiner — recently got in trouble once again for exposing his infamous…well, his infamous wiener. Everyone’s had fun ragging on Weiner for his online gaffes. Two years ago, Weiner accidentally exposed a meant-to-be-privately-sent picture of his privates to the entire [...]

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PsySociety

Fighting Fair: How To Tackle Crucial Conversations On Facebook & Twitter

ArguingPeople

When’s the last time you had an online fight?       Unfortunately, most of us probably won’t have to try particularly hard to recall the last time that this happened.  In a recent survey, 76 percent of almost 2,700 respondents indicated that they have witnessed an argument over social media, 88 percent of respondents [...]

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Roots of Unity

Math Twitter Bots, Reviewed and Rated

Math+Twitter Image: Design Shack.

In the course of being a math person on Twitter, I have run across some math-related Twitter bots and feeds. It would just be mean to grade my human tweeps, but I have no qualms about rating the bots! Taking a page from the Aperiodical’s integer sequence reviews, I’m rating them on a scale of [...]

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Roots of Unity

Mathy Ladies to Follow on Twitter

Image: Design Shack In the current issue of the Association for Women in Mathematics newsletter (password required), Anne Carlill asks where the female mathematicians are on Twitter: “I found that the only female mathematicians or math educators I followed were Nalini Joshi in Sydney and Fawn Nguyen in California. In contrast there are about 15 [...]

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Symbiartic

How To Talk To a Roomful of Artists Who Are Better Than You

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This past weekend I participated in the Association of Medical Illustrators annual meeting (hashtag #AMI2014), held with the hospitality of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, USA. Here are my public speaking tips when speaking to a roomful of artists who are better than you. Okay, first let’s define “better”. I have a Bachelor of Fine [...]

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Symbiartic

SciArt List on Twitter

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Attempting to update our Science Artist Twitter List! Have we missed you? https://t.co/ErIncNa9FA #sciart #scicomm — Symbiartic SciArt (@Symbiartic) January 7, 2014 Recently science-artist Willy Chyr [@willychyr] was looking for a Twitter list of #sciart to follow, and turned to ours. Admittedly, this was set-up in the early days of our blog and hasn’t been [...]

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Symbiartic

A Fishy Feast

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I love my Twitter feed. Sometimes it’s those little serendipitous conversations that lead to something delightful. Here’s how the cartoon above, by comic artist Talcott Starr, came about. It starts with paleontology author and National Geographic Phenomena blogger Brian Switek tweeting from the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Meeting: Then Starr came back with this: I [...]

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Symbiartic

Bleed Pretty Cells: interview with Michele Banks

MultiCellMicheleBanks-sq

Public spaces like national galleries have created a perception that art can be understood and appreciated by anyone, while the fine art world itself has grown ever-more self-referential and obscure to outsiders. Here on Symbiartic, we sometimes cover artwork that’s accessible to a specific audience, rather than everyone and no one.  Artwork that speaks, evokes, and moves the [...]

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Talking back

Twitter Twaddle and the Psychology of Crying (Screaming) Wolf

The Dow Jones Industrial Average and Twitter, both cultural mainstays that suffer at times from  acute alphanumeric ADHD, collided at ultra-high velocity on April 23 to induce an institutional chain reaction. The half life of the “flash crash” stretched a couple of minutes—and then the market came roaring back. But fewer than 140 characters sufficed [...]

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