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Posts Tagged "video"

Anthropology in Practice

Is The Grass Always Greener?

I’ve watched this video several times since @PetiteSam first shared it, and each time I’m struck by the simple message that we’re never quite satisfied. Is the idiom “the grass is always greener” true across cultures? It seems to be the case between nuts and bolts.

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The Artful Amoeba

A Closer Look at a Tiny, Floating Horde

sea_urchin_larvae_kirby_ocean_drifters

It’s a strange but true fact that the young of many familiar sea creatures look nothing like them. Drifting on currents to distribute their kind, they are an unsung part of the plankton, itself an unsung part of the sea. A few years back, I wrote about the work of Richard Kirby, a research fellow [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

There’s Darwin’s Fungus!

darwin_cyttaria_screenshot_200

Last winter I wrote a post called “Darwin’s Neon Golf Balls” about a fungus called Cyttaria that Darwin collected during his journey on the Beagle. The fungus has a fascinating alien shape and neon orange color when fresh. At the time, I wrote: According to the Royal Botanic Garden at Kew, Darwin sent his specimen [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

The Private Life of Plankton — in HD

ceratium_plankton_chronicles

Artistic black-and-white photos of plankton — as we saw last time — are fabulous. But what if one hungers for HD? The Plankton Chronicles have got you covered. On Friday I wrote about the Plankton Portal, a project to enlist the public’s help in identifying and cataloguing weird, deep-sea life. Via their blog, I learned [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

A Bleeding, Breathing Billboard Starring Serratia

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Just days after Sci Am published my story on the “bleeding” bacterium Serratia marcescens, a friend sent me this video, in which the marketing department behind the film “Contagion” up north apparently decided to go super-geek and cook up something delightful. Science as art, my friends. Way, way cool, boys. In addition to Serratia, which [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Know Another Language? Help Us Globalize Science by Translating Our Video Captions

Ever wonder what the wave function is? Or what the differences are between genes, chromosomes and DNA? Or why chimps are stronger than humans? We’ve tackled these and many other questions with our Instant Egghead video explainer series. Such questions are universal, and we know many people who don’t speak English would love the chance [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Instant Egghead Cracks Up [Video]

outtakes_featured_image

If you haven’t seen it before, “Instant Egghead” is Scientific American’s ongoing series of short and (hopefully) entertaining explainer videos. Each episode features a Scientific American editor or contributor expounding on topics ranging from particle physics to the environment to weird bodily phenomena. As Instant Egghead‘s producer, I had an important decision to make when [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Watch: How Do Knees Work? An Iron Egghead Sample Video

Can you explain science with seven everyday items? We’re looking for some creative minds to explain how a part of the human body works, or how a process occurs in it, in two minutes or less. No fancy equipment is needed, either—a smartphone camera will do. For inspiration, take a gander at this sample video, [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Want a Free Scientific American Subscription? Enter Our Iron Egghead Video Contest

Can you explain science with seven everyday items? We’re looking for some creative minds to say how a part of the human body works, or how a process occurs in the body, in two minutes or less. No fancy equipment is needed—a smartphone camera will do. Winners will be featured on the Scientific American web [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Introducing Our New Video Series: The Countdown

YouTube has fast become a place where people get their news, and in that vein, we’re delighted to join the YouTube Space Lab channel with our new online series, The Countdown. Every other Thursday, host and self-proclaimed web nerd Dave Mosher presents the five coolest things happening in space, astronomy and physics. Our first episode [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Can You Explain Science with 7 Everyday Items? Enter Our ‘Iron Egghead’ Video Contest

Iron Egghead:shoelace,paper clips, rubber band, pen,paper, cup, ball

Remember MacGyver from the old TV series? He could build a laser from a pair of eyeglasses, a match, and some dental floss and then mount it on a shark, or so it seemed. We’re not asking you to do that, exactly. Rather, we thought it’d be fun if science enthusiasts like you could explain [...]

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But Seriously...

Annalee Newitz: Where did io9 get its name?

Annalee Newitz and Brian Malow

Today is Annalee Newitz‘s birthday (well, it’s still today in the most relevant time zone – uh, hers not mine). Annalee has been writing about the intersection of science and technology and culture for many years. It’s a busy intersection. Since 2008, she’s been editor-in-chief of one of my favorite websites, io9.com. If you don’t [...]

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But Seriously...

Linda Avey on Open Access and 23andMe

Linda Avey

With 23andMe in the news this week, I thought it was a good time to share something I’d never published before. It’s a short interview with Linda Avey, co-founder of 23andMe. I spoke with Linda a couple years ago at the 2011 Open Science Summit in Mountain View, CA. I asked her a few questions [...]

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But Seriously...

Space: The Private Frontier

Brian at SpaceX

Following up on the SpaceX launch videos I posted yesterday, I wanted to repost this video I made a couple years ago for Time.com. In 2010, I visited the SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, CA. This was my second visit to their one-stop rocket factory, thanks to an old friend who works for the company. But [...]

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But Seriously...

Amazing SpaceX Rocket Launch Video

SpaceX Grasshopper

SpaceX – of course – is already one of my favorite companies on the planet, or even throughout Known Space. They’re not-so-quietly revolutionizing the terran space industry with the humble goal of ultimately “enabling people to live on other planets.” Hey, I’m a person! And I think it would be cool if founder/CEO/CTO Elon Musk [...]

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But Seriously...

Welcome to Raleigh Video for ASTC

Brian Malow and the Daily Planet

In my day job – a phrase that still doesn’t roll off the tongue, having been a freelancer for two decades – I work at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh. Next year, our museum will be host to the biggest conference in the museum world. ASTC is the Association of Science-Technology [...]

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But Seriously...

Stunning Live Visual Effects in Box

Box

Wow. This is the most awesome thing I saw yesterday, even though I watched – and enjoyed – Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.. This short video entitled, “Box,” packed a bigger punch in five minutes than Joss Whedon and ABC did in an hour. Invoking the classic Arthur C. Clarke line, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable [...]

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Compound Eye

How Photography Transformed Spider Science

For being mildly arachnophobic I’ve been on a real spider binge lately. Here’s a wonderful Smithsonian-produced video highlighting the role of photography in spider science: (h/t Bug Girl)

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Compound Eye

Thrifty Thursday: Army Ants Filmed on a Budget

Thrifty Thursdays feature photographs movies taken with equipment costing less than $500. [Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS3 - $241; Glidetrack shooter - $276] I often fill the Thrifty Thursday slot with still photographs from my trusty Panasonic digicam. As much as I like the camera for snapshots, though, I actually bought it for video. This clip was [...]

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Culturing Science

Glacial Poetry: Photos Don’t Do Them Justice

A photo doesn't really do a glacier justice. Photo by Tolka Rover CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

I have never seen a glacier (or any sea ice for that matter) in real life, though I’ve seen them in countless photos. I’m spellbound by James Balog’s Extreme Ice Survey, at the shapes and scale of ice in the Arctic. I express the perfect mixture of dismay and wonder at “then and now” photos [...]

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Culturing Science

The Epic Battle of Crab vs. Crab

fiddler-crab

Fiddler crabs are strange little beasties. Males have what amounts to one giant claw, which can be as long as his body is wide, and one tiny T. rex arm that looks quite out of place on a crab. Recently, a researcher wrote a blog post about why fiddler crabs have such an enormous claw [...]

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Culturing Science

The Swan Song of the Cicadas

cicada

After surviving cicada emergences and witnessing several cycles of journalism’s cicada beat, you’d think I’d have seen it all. Articles about prime number cycling and climate change, evolution and recipes. I even contributed to the pile-on in 2011, considering why bursts of cicadas don’t seem to help bird populations. All of this attention is, of course, well-deserved: [...]

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Culturing Science

A Hilarious Behind-the-Scenes Tour of Montana’s Natural History Museum

graslie-brain-scoop

The University of Montana’s natural history museum in Missoula is the “largest zoological museum in Montana and one of the major zoological collections of the Northern Rocky Mountains,” according to its website. Its collections hold 14,500 mammalian specimens, 7,000 birds, 3,200 fish, and 320 reptiles and amphibians. However, it’s different than the typical ideal of [...]

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Culturing Science

Breathtaking time-lapse video makes me question Copernicus

uncage2

The earth revolves around the sun. It’s a true fact, and no conspiracy. Even with such enlightenment, it’s nice to be reminded of why people once thought the opposite — that the universe revolves around the earth — to briefly knock us off our ivory tower of knowledge and be reminded of just how far [...]

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Culturing Science

Lazy Sunday Video: An epic tour of life’s history

This is one of my favorite videos that I’ve seen on the whole of the internet. (Gasp!) Piecing together clips from dozens of science documentaries and specials overlaid with stunning music, the youtube user UppruniTegundanna starts out tracing the history of humans, integrating technological and artistic development. Then it takes a turn to beautifully visualize the [...]

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Extinction Countdown

First-Ever Video of Critically Endangered Myanmar Snub-Nosed Monkeys

myanmar snub-nosed monkey

Here’s something you don’t see every day: video footage of the critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus strykeri), a species that was only discovered in 2010. You can count at least 23 of the rare monkeys, out of a total population estimated to range from 260 to 330 individuals for the entire species, in the [...]

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Food Matters

Our Microbial Organ – The Good and Bad Bugs of the Human Gut

340px-Digestive_system_diagram_edit.svg

Ever since coming to Harvard, I’ve been involved with a graduate student group called “Science in the News.” At SITN, the goal is to bring the fascination with scientists that graduate students have to a wider audience, and the flagship effort of the group is a series of lectures held every Autumn and Spring that [...]

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Not bad science

Forget The Flea Circus, Bees Can Do All The Tricks

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When we think of animals doing tricks, we’re likely to think of dogs               or maybe even a parrot               But you probably didn’t think of bumblebees. However, check out these videos of these bumblebees performing some seemingly impressive feats:   How did [...]

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Observations

3 Ingredients Make Good July 4th Fireworks [Video]

How different types of chemicals combine for a holiday blast.

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Observations

Lonely Star Cluster Kicked Out of Its Galaxy [Video]

illustration of hypervelocity globular cluster 1 (HVGC-1)

Like most star clusters, hypervelocity globular cluster 1 (HVGC-1) once belonged to a galaxy, but this unlucky object is now destined to wander the cosmos alone. Somehow, the cluster was ejected from its home galaxy, M87, and is now speeding away at more than two million miles per hour. Learn more in the video below: [...]

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Observations

How a Young Boy, a Cow and a Milkmaid Helped to Conquer Smallpox [Video]

Screen Shot 2013-10-29 at 2.45.51 PM

If you aren’t familiar with the TEDEd series of animated videos, you should be. The series pairs professional educators with top-notch animators to create short video “lessons” on a huge variety of topics in science, medicine and history.
 The latest episode features several of the early attempts to fight smallpox, a disease caused by a [...]

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Observations

Gravity-Defying, Self-Siphoning Metal Beads Explained [Video]

The effect is as astonishing as it is hypnotic: a chain of metal beads magically arcs above its container as the beads fall to the ground. The beads in the video, made by Steve Mould, who hosts several BBC science shows, are not magnetic, either. Pretty cool, huh? Mould gives us an explanation the video [...]

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Observations

Robot Bees Learn to Fly [Video]

RoboBees

In March, the Harvard University researchers behind the RoboBee project wrote an article in Scientific American that detailed the challenges of building a swarm of bee-sized robots. The effort breaks into three loose categories: first, you have to figure out how to build a insect-sized robot that can fly (and build a lot of them—no [...]

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Observations

Crowd Watching: Video Analytics Could Flag Crimes Before They Happen

Boston marathon, bomb, investigation

Soon after the investigation into Monday’s Boston Marathon bombings began, law enforcement urged the public to e-mail any video, images or other information that might lead them to the guilty party. “No piece of information or detail is too small,” states the F.B.I.’s Web site. Picking through all of this footage in search of clues [...]

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Observations

Why Jim Hansen Stopped Being a Government Scientist [Video]

Why did James Hansen retire on April 2 after 32 years as director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies? As he told the enterprising students of Columbia University’s Sustainability Media Lab who captured him in the following video, “I want to devote full time to trying to help the public understand the urgency of [...]

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Observations

Beautiful Video Imagines the Thousands of Known Exoplanets Orbiting a Single Star

LONG BEACH, Calif.—Yesterday I wrote about the excitement at the American Astronomical Meeting here about new exoplanet discoveries. Scientists working on the Kepler satellite announced the discovery of an additional 461 planet candidates, bringing the total to 2,740. What are these planets like? Alex Parker, a postdoctoral researcher in planetary science at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center [...]

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Observations

Qualcomm Kicks Off CES with Superfast Snapdragon Mobile Processors (Endorsed by NASCAR, Big Bird and Captain Kirk)

CES

LAS VEGAS—In a sign of how wireless technologies have moved to the fore in consumer electronics, Qualcomm CEO Paul Jacobs kicked off the 2013 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) here Monday night with a keynote spotlighting the impact of superfast processors on mobile apps, gaming and even ultra high-definition television (Ultra HDTV). Smart phones, tablets and [...]

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Observations

Please Play with Your Math: New Museum Opens in New York City

Math can be a beautiful, immersive, full-body experience, according to the creators of the newly opened Museum of Math, or MoMath, in New York City. A sculpture that lights up and plays music, a touch-screen floor that turns into a maze and a square-wheeled tricycle that one can ride around a bumpy track are just [...]

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Octopus Chronicles

First Common Octopus Cannibalism Filmed in the Wild

octopus cannibalism

Perhaps it’s time we stopped feeling quite so bad about eating octopus. Octopuses dine on other octopuses, too. And for the first time, that behavior has been caught on video in the common octopus in the wild—three times. Cannibalistic behavior in the lab setting is well known. This is one of the reasons octopuses can be so [...]

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Octopus Chronicles

8 Great Octopus Videos! [Video]

It’s Octopus Chronicles‘ 88th post! To celebrate, I’ve gone on an all-arms hunt through the deep crevasses of the internet to find eight of my favorite octopus videos. Some are old classics (such as Roger Hanlon‘s amazing, reverse-vanishing octopus) and others are new and stunning—and one even features an octopus walking (slithering?) on land. Really, [...]

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Oscillator

Biological Speculation

A great short talk by Drew Endy about the early history of synthetic biology and the motivations, hopes, and uncertainties of bioengineering. How do we know we’re making good decisions? How can we create more improbable patterns? What should we be vibrating about?

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Oscillator

Human Cheese and the Microbial Superhighway

Cheese is a fascinating model for studying the intersection of human and microbial cultures. My project with Sissel Tolaas explores these connections through the process of making cheese using microbes sampled from the human body. Here is a short film for the project featuring interviews with microbiologist Benjamin Wolfe, cheesemaker Seana Doughty, anthropologist Heather Paxson, [...]

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Oscillator

A Beautiful Fungus Graveyard

Last month’s UCLA-Leonardo Art|Science Evening Rendezvous (LASER) included a fabulous lightning talk from Seri Robinson, a professor of wood anatomy at Oregon State University and a wood artist. She works with wood colored by fungal pigments, exploring the interactions between different species as they grow and bump in to each other to leave behind beautiful [...]

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Oscillator

Synthetic Biology Slam

The night before SB5.0 started, students and postdocs got together for the first ever Synthetic Biology Slam. Presenters had five minutes to talk about their vision of synthetic biology and their big idea for the future. One of my favorites was by Evan Clark, a member of the Brown-Stanford iGEM team and the Stanford spoken [...]

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Oscillator

An Action Hero Approach to Energy

A few months ago (before the recent batch of scandals), Arnold Schwarzenegger gave the keynote speech at the ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit that several of my colleagues attended. His perspectives as a bodybuilder (“Stephen, how are your glutes?”), a Republican who believes in global warming and the promise of bipartisan environmental legislation, and an action [...]

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PsiVid

Annedroids: A New Science Program for Kids

ANNEDROIDS

Are you looking for an entertaining program for your kids to get them excited about science and engineering with role models their own age? Sinking Ship Entertainment, the Emmy nominated, award-winning production company that specializes in TV and transmedia projects for kids, (having worked with Nick Jr. and now one of the first partners of [...]

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PsiVid

Meet ‘The Physics Girl’, Winner of Alan Alda’s “What is Color?” Video Contest

What is Color?

Imagine you are a 5th grader while watching this video. Would you love it? If it caught your interest, as it did mine, you are in good company. This is the winning entry for the 2014 Flame Challenge put on by Alan Alda and the Center for Communicating Science. The challenge this year was for someone [...]

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PsiVid

Hyperlapse Know How

From Moving Through New York by George Tompkinson

I ran across this hyperlapse video of Singapore the other day: It got me thinking of a few other cities given the hyperlapse treatment, like Dubai: So I wondered, “What exactly is hyperlapse and how is it done?” I found a brief description at Know Your Meme website: “Hyperlapse Photography is a filmmaking technique that [...]

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PsiVid

Back to Joshua Tree for Night Timelapse and Startrails

JoshuaTree4

I never tire of nighttime timelapse and startrails videos. Sunchaser videos produce some of the best around. Their latest is another trip out to Joshua Tree. From their Vimeo site: “Back to Joshua Tree once more for another timelapse journey! This time we focused on the Indian Cove section of the park, as well as [...]

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PsiVid

The Slow Mo Guys Visit GE Labs and Get Scientific

Super Hydrophobic Surface

The generally mischievous pair on youtube who film their antics in extreme slow motion using a digital high-speed camera, capable of shooting over 10000 frames a second, the Slow Mo Guys, were invited by GE to visit their labs in New York to film some fascinating techniques with their speciality cameras. At this time, there [...]

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PsiVid

Advert Informs that Dmitri Mendeleev Knew the Science of Perfect Vodka

Dmitri Mendeleev (Wikipedia)

I just viewed an advertisement released last month from Russian Standard Vodka that claims its product is ‘The Convergence of Science and Nature’. In just over three minutes, it tells us the story of Mendeleev and a few other tidbits of science fact to convince us this is so, along with impressive visuals. This cinematographically [...]

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PsiVid

Not Your Typical Laboratory Equipment Promo Video!

IKAvideo

I just ran across a promotional video for homegenizers, mixers, and emulsifiers for the laboratory from a company called IKA, which sells products around the world. Trust me, you want to see this! It’s unique in the world of science because it employs visual elements that are quite typical in the rest of the advertising [...]

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PsiVid

Behind the Scenes of “Box”– Mixing Design, Storytelling and Technology

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 11.49.15 AM

That mesmerizing installation of light and illusion using 3D projection mapping and robots, Box, that I shared with you last week, left me a bit unsettled. Why? Because, as I watched, I kept asking myself in my mind, “HOW DID THEY DO THAT?” instead of sitting back and enjoying it. (I’ve been often accused of [...]

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PsiVid

Box–The Synthesis of Real and Digital Space (with Robots!)

A scene from "Escape" segment of "Box"

Watch, and have your mind bent, blown, and boggled. Astounding. Appropriately, this video ends with the Arthur C. Clarke quote, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” If you’ve recovered from your state of awe and want to learn more about this performance, I’ve grabbed a couple of descriptions directly from the website “Bot [...]

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PsiVid

A Capella Science–Bohemian Gravity

Screen Shot 2013-09-18 at 8.25.23 AM

Who has not caught themselves singing along to Queen’s number one hit “Bohemian Rhapsody”? Perhaps we’ve made up words when we didn’t know them! But, have any of you attempted to explain string theory to the tune? I’ll bet it didn’t go as well as in this new version by Tim Blais of A Capella [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Watch the Incredible Shrinking Woman [Video]

“Big” me. “Little” me. Watch these two versions of me–which are really the same size–explain why I appear petite in one place on screen and large in another. The reason, in short, is that I have been trapped in a clever visual illusion, one invented 78 years ago by American opthalmologist Adelbert Ames Jr. In [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Star Filmmakers Found in Unlikely Spot

Two kids in lab coats and goggles apparently doing an experiment.

In Tyson Schoeber’s class at Nootka Elementary School in Vancouver, 15 fourth through seventh graders struggle to read, write or do math at a level near that of their peers in other classes. Ten-year-olds have entered Schoeber’s program, called THRIVE, virtually unable to read independently (see “One Man’s Mission to Save Struggling Students”). Yet Schoeber [...]

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Symbiartic

Talking Visual Communication on BreakingBio

BreakingBio-Glendon-Mellow

Summer went by swiftly, but my words of wisdom shall last throughout the ages. Come and be charmed by Bug Girl, Steven Hamblin and Morgan Jackson, while I deliver my sermon from atop the Canadian peaks of sciart greatness, and spread loaves of sage advice and tattooed goodness to gladden your heart. It is I, [...]

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