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Posts Tagged "natural history"

The Artful Amoeba

Some Spider: My House Spider Took Out a Scorpion

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Two scorpions, actually. One of the more unpleasant facts about life in the Deep South is the sheer number of insects who call your house home. When I moved to southern Texas from my nearly bug-free Colorado quarters, I discovered I would now be sharing digs with carpenter ants, sugar ants, tiny paper-eating silverfish, an [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Natural History is Dying, and We Are All the Losers

The Artful Amoeba

My Favorite Biology Finds in London’s Natural History Museum

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  This past year, I made a pilgrimage that every natural history lover should, if possible, make. I visited the Natural History Museum in London, the house that Richard Owen built, the home of the first dinosaur bones ever discovered, the first Archaeopteryx fossil, and a first-edition copy of  “On the Origin of Species”. If [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

What Does a Marmot Sound Like?

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What happens when squirrels invade the tundra? Well, in one case, they got chubby, fluffy, flappy-tailed, and occasionally kinda cranky, sorta like a hydrophobic alpine beaver. Here in the Rockies, they’re called yellow-bellied marmots. Until recently, I’d rarely seen one and had never heard one call. They seemed to maintain a strict code of silence [...]

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Compound Eye

Insects found, and not found, at Middlefork Savanna

I hope you’ll forgive a post with no point other than to share a few photos. Yesterday I drove to Chicago in search of an ant I’d not yet photographed for an Ants of North America project. The ant is the charismatic Dolichoderus mariae, a species that isn’t actually all that rare but seems to magically elude [...]

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Expeditions

The Lawson Trek: Paddling the Intracoastal Waterway

Lunch on an oyster shoal after a surprisingly easy first morning of paddling. (It got harder.)

We stopped for lunch during the first day of the Lawson Trek on an oyster shoal, an uncharacteristically hot October sun stinging my shoulders, but surprisingly unbothered by four hours of kayak paddling. We had crossed Charleston Harbor against the current — the tide was coming in, whereas we were heading offshore. From the Charleston [...]

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Expeditions

The Lawson Trek: Finding Something New

Either this is the only existing portrait of John Lawson or there isn’t one. It’s the right time period, the right attitude, the right name, and the right artist, but questions remain (for example, Lawson was never knighted, but the portrait’s history identifies him as “sir”).  Source: From the private collection of Elizabeth Sparrow. Used by kind permission.

Editor’s note: For The Lawson Trek, journalist Scott Huler is retracing the journey of discovery undertaken by canoe and on foot in 1700-1701 by John Lawson, the first observer to carefully describe and catalogue the flora, fauna, geography and inhabitants of the Carolinas. For all the posts in the series, click here. We cannot get [...]

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Symbiartic

10 Original Gifts for Science (and SciArt) Geeks

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It’s time again for me to offer up a few quirky gift ideas for the science enthusiasts in your life. I guarantee these will be the most original gifts under the tree! And the best part? Many are under $50. Squee! 10. Periodic Table Cutting Board by Elysium Woodworks, $45 on Etsy.com 9. Embroidered Anatomy [...]

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Symbiartic

The ScienceArt Exhibit Roundup This Fall

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So much good scienceart on display… where to begin!? EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain C-Gates station Washington Dulles International Airport Washington, D.C. Life: Magnified is an exhibit of scientific images showing cells and other scenes of life magnified by as much as 50,000 [...]

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Symbiartic

Looking Back on 30 Science Artists in 30 Days

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For three years now we have been celebrating science artists here on Symbiartic. Every September we have stepped it up a notch to feature a different science artist each day in our September SciArt Blitz. In case you missed any of them, here is a visual summary of the 2014 SciArt Blitz artists (click on [...]

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Symbiartic

Portraits of Bonsai at the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens

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As I write this, the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens is preparing an exhibit showcasing the work of Dick Rauh, a botanical illustrator who has distinguished himself as a master of botanical illustration since he picked up a pen and paper in his retirement. In a show called “Patience, Paper, Pen and Brush,” the Gardens will be [...]

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Symbiartic

Who Illustrates the Murals at Museums?

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Have you ever wondered who illustrates the murals at our beloved museums, zoos, aquariums, and botanical gardens? Marjorie Leggitt is one such person. Based in Boulder, CO, she has spent her career illuminating science and natural processes through her art. This mural was made for the Denver Botanical Gardens in Denver, CO to illustrate the [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Through September and Beyond

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The inside scoop on the best science art exhibitions around the country: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain C-Gates station Washington Dulles International Airport Washington, D.C. Life: Magnified is an exhibit of scientific images showing cells and other scenes of life magnified by as [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Heat Up This Summer

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Take a break from the heat this summer to step into some cool galleries exhibiting scienceart. If the exhibits keep pouring in at this rate, I’ll have to split up this post by region. There are five scienceart exhibits in New York alone! But for those of you who are not in the NY-region, don’t [...]

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Symbiartic

Learning the Art of Science Illustration

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If you’ve ever wondered what it would take to combine your love of science and art, there is a conference on the horizon that might just be the inspiration you’ve been waiting for. This summer in Boulder, CO, the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators is hosting its annual conference and it is not to be [...]

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Symbiartic

For Admirers of Audubon & Sibley, Two Recurring Art Exhibits

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If you appreciate John J. Audubon’s exacting detail and beautiful compositions and you marvel at the encyclopedic knowledge and delicate illustrations in the famous Sibley Bird Guides you may be interested to know that there are many contemporary masters following in their footsteps today. Their names may be less well-known, but their work is equally [...]

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Symbiartic

The ScienceArt Exhibit Roundup for Spring

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This is the dish on the latest exhibits combining science and art around the country. This time the prize for the most bumpin’ scienceArt scene goes to the Northeast, amirite? Lucky you if you live there: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION JESSICA DRENK: An Allegory of Algorithms and Aesthetics April 12 – May 12, 2014 Adah Rose [...]

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