ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "sexism"

Compound Eye

Elsevier’s Latest Journal Is Just For Bros

[what's this?]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

Nature Publishing Group’s New Journal

[What's this about?]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Stag Parties: Awareness and Elegant Solutions

Kiddo spills her milk. We lock eyes, and she dissolves in a puddle of sadness, crying about how it’s all her fault and she feels SO BAD. “Kiddo, honey, it’s really okay. Let’s get a towel and wipe it up together.” But she can’t stop crying. I comfort her for a while, being patient with [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Toxic or Just Tough?

I’m working against too many deadlines as usual and am unable to write a long blog post. But I was pretty troubled by this piece in The Nation the other day… troubled because the hard work and brilliant insights of black women I respected were being turned into something far more sinister. Suddenly white women [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Welcome or Not Welcome: Off the Air Thoughts

I was asked to be a guest on a local NPR affiliate show today with Amanda Hess (in a previously recorded interview) and Emily Graslie (with me in the second half). Each of us has had things to say recently about women… women and online harassment, women in science communication, women and tokenism. As the [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

The Edge’s Annual Question: The Way We Produce and Advance Science

This year, I was invited to contribute to the Edge Foundation’s Annual Question. Other contributor include Helen Fisher, Irene Pepperberg, Alan Alda, Nina Jablonski, Jay Rosen, and, well 150 others: http://www.edge.org/responses/what-scientific-idea-is-ready-for-retirement The question was, “What scientific idea is ready for retirement?” My contribution: The Way We Produce And Advance Science Last year, I spearheaded a [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

The Nature 10, and Where To Go From Here

Yesterday was a pretty big day for me. I was named as one of the Nature 10 for 2013, and one of my posts made it into the Best Online Science Writing of 2013 (AKA The Open Lab) – that’s three years in a row I’ve been in that anthology. I cannot thank you all [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Punching Down, Doubling Down: Joe Hanson, PBS, and This Idea of Community

The actions of a few have exposed some major problems in the actions and thinking of many. The way the science communication community responds to crises, and the desire of some to prevent “scolding” or not “attack allies” has revictimized members of our community. This actually implicates the whole community as stifling progress and hurting [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Why #standingwithDNLee’s Orientation towards SciAm Was So Important

I’ve seen a number of tweets and blog comments over the last few days wondering – some nicely, some not so nicely – why so many of us reacted more strongly to Scientific American’s response to Dr. Danielle Lee’s post, rather than to Biology-Online’s worker’s comment about her being an “urban whore.” Here’s the short [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

This is not a post about discovering science

Re blog inquiry: @sciam is a publication for discovering science. The post was not appropriate for this area & was therefore removed. — Mariette DiChristina (@mdichristina) October 12, 2013 This is not a post about discovering science. This is not a post about discovering science. This is not a post about discovering science. This is [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

No One Is Immune. I Am Not Immune.

TRIGGER WARNING. Describes unwanted contact, may be triggering to survivors of harassment or assault. *     *     * No woman is immune. *     *     * “Don’t I know you from the gym?” A trim, older man is smiling in line in front of me at the allergist’s office. [...]

Keep reading »
Molecules to Medicine

Reflections from a Woman on “Otherness” in Medicine

No sexism, racism, homophobia

When Danielle N. Lee, a PhD biologist, was likened to a whore last week for declining to work for free, I was furious. She and Scicurious proposed a series of posts on diversity in science and I reached out, asking if my perspective as a woman physician might be of interest. (As a physician, and [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Envying Evolution: What Can The X-Men Teach Us About Stereotypes?

x_men_logo

This weekend marked the opening of X-Men: Days of Future Past, the latest installment in the wildly successful X-Men movie franchise. For those who are unfamiliar with the X-Men series, the stories revolve around groups of ‘mutants,’ super-powered beings who supposedly represent the next stage in human evolution and whose powers run the gamut from [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

“What else can you expect from a crappo?”

Man got an amazing idea

I’m back at the BPS Research Digest today, with my second of three guest posts this week on recent social psychological research. My second post is on a recent paper published by P.J. Henry, Sarah Butler, and Mark Brandt. In light of recent debates about whether or not certain group-based slurs are “more offensive” than [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

“But I didn’t mean it!” Why it’s so hard to prioritize impacts over intents.

i_blame_you_by_mcknackus_theoneth-d56q4ql

I spend a lot of time talking with friends and colleagues about societal issues that we find meaningful and important. Racism. Sexism. Cultural sensitivity. Prejudice. Implicit biases. This is a line that we often find ourselves repeating: “It’s not about intent. It’s about impact.” It came up in a discussion with several friends in reference [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Dinosaurs

Get Total Access to our Digital Anthology

1,200 Articles

Order Now - Just $39! >

X

Email this Article

X