ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "photography"

The Artful Amoeba

The Surprising Subject of the First Book of Photographs

algae_cyanotype_wiki_anna_atkins_200

In these hyperlinked days, one might reasonably guess that the subject of the first book of photographs may have been along the lines of the True Purpose of the Internet (ask someone who’s seen “Avenue Q” if you don’t know). Or if not that, perhaps cityscapes, or naval vessels, or still lifes, or battlefields. But [...]

Keep reading »
Beautiful Minds

Why Education Needs More Radioactive Spiders

andrew-garfield-the-amazing-spider-man-image-4

Education needs more radioactive spiders. Stay with me. Remember Peter Parker? His childhood wasn’t easy. Both of his parents– Richard and Mary– were killed on a mission as double agents. Raised by his Uncle Ben and Aunt May in Queens, Peter spent most of his childhood without an identity. Now, Peter was a good student. [...]

Keep reading »
But Seriously...

Insect Paparazzi: Leafhoppers!

Japanese Maple Leafhopper-Brian Malow

You might not know this about me but I have a particular science art fetish: I’m into insect photography. By which, of course, I mean photographs taken by insects. In pursuit of this art, I’ve chased insects around so doggedly – sweating in the summer sun, getting bitten all to hell by malarial mosquitos – [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

How To Manipulate a Firefly Photograph The Old-Fashioned Way, Through Focus

Fireflies

In the previous post, I listed a couple ways in which photographers digitally alter firefly photographs. How nefarious of them! I admit, however,  the post was a wee bit facetious. Photoshop can be used to alter the appearance of an image, of course, but cameras themselves have enough variables that a photographer can exercise tremendous [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

How To Pick A Photoshopped Firefly

Photinus pyralis

Now that firefly season is sparking up our eastern and midwestern summer evenings, I am starting to see not just the insects themselves but the attendant media buzz. That nature gets some public attention is a good thing, of course. But nature untouched isn’t apparently enough for everyone. A surprising number of common stock firefly [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

Wasps Are Our Friends: Part III

Megischus bicolor

You might think an insect with an extra pointy derriere would pack a fearsome sting, but you’d be wrong. The extended rear appendage of the crown-of-thorns wasp is not a stinger but an egg-laying organ, the ovipositor, used to reach beetle grubs chewing through the wood below. Young wasps develop as ectoparasites of beetles in [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

Wasps Are Our Friends: Part II

Eucharitid6f

The second in our series promoting the breadth and value of wasps features the gorgeous Orasema, a tiny metallic wasp that lives in ant nests. Young wasps feed on developing ant brood. When they mature, the winged adults leave the nest to fly and mate. After mating, Orasema biology gets weird. Instead of sensibly returning to [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

Professional Photography Approaches Gender Balance

photographers_gender1f

In 1970, fewer than one in five professional photographers were female. Times have changed: (Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research, with data from the U.S. Deptartment of Labor)

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

A Short Safari In A Small Oak Tree

UrbanaTree9f

Imagine a safari in your neighborhood. Instead of a few days hauling luggage through international airports, though, picture a leisurely five minute stroll from the front door. Local nature holds fantastic mini wildlife. For those willing to trade global for local, and large for small, there is plenty to see. I am speaking of ant lions [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

Recipe For A Photograph #4: The Emerging Mosquito

Aedes aegypti

Here is a powerful method to photograph the world’s most dangerous animal in an unusual moment of vulnerability. But first, a digression into mosquito biology. Mosquitoes lead a starkly different existence between their early days and their adult lives, spending their youth in the water and their adulthood in the air. The transition occurs when [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

Fill Flash In Wide Angle Macro Photography

Malacosoma americanum - eastern tent caterpillar

What is the secret to the evenly balanced exposure across both the foreground and background in this fisheye photograph? It is not a clever processing job in photoshop. Rather, I used a handheld flash set to sufficient power to bring the foreground caterpillars up to the same light levels as the sky. Fill flash is [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

An Interview with Christine Shepard, Shark Photographer

CSf

Anyone paying attention to science outreach in recent years will have learned a great deal about shark biology, whether they intended to or not. That’s because the University of Miami’s R. J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program, an active shark research group, communicates its efforts on a social media scale few other laboratories can match. Their tweets [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

The World’s Most Viewed Landscape, A Decade Later

bliss1f

Anyone who booted up a Windows computer in the early 2000′s is likely familiar with the grassy hillsides and brilliant sky of “Bliss”, a 1996 photograph by California wine country photographer Charles O’Rear. The image is precisely what a basic background should be: clean, bright, airy, inviting. Fittingly, “Bliss” lacks an immediate point of interest, [...]

Keep reading »
Culturing Science

Seeing the Blue Marble for the First Time

The_Earth_seen_from_Apollo_17-small

I’ve never really appreciated how lucky I am to have grown up with the blue marble. A poster of the earth floating in an endless black sea decorated the walls of my science classrooms since I was in elementary school. Even if it wasn’t spoken regularly, that image ensured that I knew the duality of [...]

Keep reading »
Culturing Science

Why Sociable Weavers Nest Together

assimilation-1-small

Dillon Marsh’s photographs of sociable weaver nests, taken in the Kalahari Desert of Southern Africa, beautifully illustrate traditional nature–the realm of wild animals–overlapping with human civilization. The apparent bales of hay draped over the tops and sides of telephone poles are home to hundreds of songbirds, which construct and maintain their monstrous nests communally. While [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

We’re in Iceland – thanks for traveling with us!

Whoa, we are in Iceland. Our thirty days at sea are over. This is the sappy wrap up post, so I’ll try to keep the poetic waxing to a minimum. In the last 30 days, the scientists aboard the R/V Knorr have woken up early, gone to bed late, collected data, fought about which condiments [...]

Keep reading »
Extinction Countdown

Film Fakery: Does Shark Week Harm Conservation Efforts?

great white shark

Great White Serial Killer. World’s Deadliest Sharks. I Escaped Jaws. Sharkpocalypse. These are just a few of the programs airing this week during the Discovery Channel’s annual Shark Week and NatGeo Wild’s new copycat, Sharkfest. Undoubtedly these programs will attract their usual massive ratings, but they may be guilty of the same kinds of film [...]

Keep reading »
Image of the Week

The Emerging Mosquito

Wild-mosquito

Image Credit: © Alex Wild Source: Recipe For A Photograph #4: The Emerging Mosquito, on Compound Eye As the weather warms and spring marches into summer, mosquito pupae are shedding their skins and emerging from stagnant pools to search for warm mammalian blood. The thought of swarms of pesky mosquitoes and the itchy red welts [...]

Keep reading »
Image of the Week

A Mitey Claw

mite_claw-FEATURE

If the key to happiness is appreciating the little things in life, then take a moment to appreciate the claw of a microscopic mite only 600 µm long. It’s from a new species discovered in the soil of a chestnut plantation where they use their nubbles and knobs (technically known as palettes) to “swim” through [...]

Keep reading »
Image of the Week

Painting the Air

Firefly-Alex-Wild-mini

  From: My best photographs of 2013 Source: Alex Wild As a painter, one of the challenges I face is pushing the paint around until it resembles real life. On occasion, a photo does the same in reverse. This charming firefly seems to magically stand astride a pair of diarylide yellow paintbrush strokes in mid-air. [...]

Keep reading »
Image of the Week

Freezing, Boiling, Dehydration and Starvation

Adult_tardigrade_mini

  From: Why Life Does Not Really Exist by Ferris Jabr at Brainwaves Source: Goldstein Lab on Flickr Tardigrades are among the most hardy creatures on earth. These tiny, half-millimeter long organisms can survive freezing, boiling, dehydration, and starvation. This scanning electron micrograph, taken in Bob Goldstein’s lab at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, shows the [...]

Keep reading »
Image of the Week

Skeletons of Light

iotw_6Nov2013_mini

From: Tripping the Light Fantastic: Artists Paint With Light by Jennifer Ouellette at Cocktail Party Physics Source: Janne Parvianen Light painting is a 125-year-old art form where long exposure cameras capture the path of light, rending a sometimes other-worldly image. In 2011 Finnish artist Janne Parviainen produced a series of light paintings called “Light Skeletons” in [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Cassini Spacecraft Takes 1 Last Look at Home Today

Photo credit: CICLOPS, JPL, ESA, NASA

For a quarter-hour today, some of us on Earth can look up and know that almost a billion miles away, above the sky, a set of robotic eyes is looking right back. The Cassini spacecraft will be passing into Saturn’s shadow at that time, slewing its cameras to catch the planet’s majestic rings backlit by [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Amazing Video of Solar Eclipse Shows Sun’s Structure

Eclipse showing the Sun's chromosphere

This time-lapse video of Sunday’s solar eclipse highlights the Sun’s outer layers: The photographer Cory Poole constructed the video by pasting together 700 photographs taken with a Coronado Solar Max 60 Double Stack telescope. According to Jason Kottke, Poole used a filter that only allows light from hydrogen atoms moving from the 2nd excited state [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Google Doodle’s Galloping Steed Commemorates Pioneering Photographer Edward Muybridge

Today’s Google doodle pays homage to the photography of Eadweard J. Muybridge, pioneering photographer and inventor of the zoopraxiscope. If he had somehow survived to witness the multimedia era, Muybridge would be marking his 182nd birthday. The running horse video, which replaces the Google logo today, comes from Muybridge’s most famous photographic experiment. Renowned for [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Photographer Vincent Fournier Opens Eerie Window on the World’s Space Programs [Video]

There’s a reason that so many sci-fi thrillers are set in space. Well, there are probably many reasons. But it’s certainly true that the tools of space exploration often have a haunting, sterile, almost creepy quality. Vincent Fournier captures that quality in his photographs, taken at the research and operations facilities of space programs around [...]

Keep reading »
PsiVid

Chris Hadfield Photographs the World in New Book!

Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 9.13.35 AM

Today, Chris Hadfield shared in social media a previously released video, Chris Hadfield’s Snapshots from Space! “Throughout his ISS mission, CSA Astronaut Chris Hadfield has been taking some of the most incredible photos of Earth ever seen. In this video, the Station Commander takes us to the best seat in the house to gaze at [...]

Keep reading »
Running Ponies

Humpback Heat Runs: How to Photograph the Biggest Courtship Battle on Earth

whales-darren-jew-featured

There’s something about humpback whales that makes them seem so peaceful. Just elegant, wonderful creatures that wouldn’t hurt a soul, unless that soul happens to be contained by a small fish or a delicious crustacean. But there comes a time in every male humpback’s life when he has to step up and fight. Imagine nine [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Heat Up This Summer

14-021FEATURE

Take a break from the heat this summer to step into some cool galleries exhibiting scienceart. If the exhibits keep pouring in at this rate, I’ll have to split up this post by region. There are five scienceart exhibits in New York alone! But for those of you who are not in the NY-region, don’t [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

How Well Will You Age?

14-022FEATURE

When we’re young, we quietly take stock of those around us and reject notions that we will eventually gain weight, deflate, wrinkle and sag. When we’re old, we reminisce about the smooth, taut and strong bodies of our youth. You can look to your relatives for rough facsimiles of how you might age, but ultimately, [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

The ScienceArt Exhibit Roundup for Spring

14-015FEATURE

This is the dish on the latest exhibits combining science and art around the country. This time the prize for the most bumpin’ scienceArt scene goes to the Northeast, amirite? Lucky you if you live there: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION JESSICA DRENK: An Allegory of Algorithms and Aesthetics April 12 – May 12, 2014 Adah Rose [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Original Gifts for Science and Art Geeks

13-048MWM3

Looking for a knock-out gift for the science geek in your life? Look no further. If you like art and you like science, these artists, all featured on Symbiartic at one point, have gifts that will impress even the most jaded gift recipients… Made With Molecules Jewelry by Raven Hanna, PhD. Raven Hanna, PhD. left [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

What Artists Know About Light That Physicists Are Missing

13-051FEATURE

Whether you learned that light was a particle or a wave in high school physics, you likely inferred that only physicists could ultimately weigh in on the subject. Technically true, I suppose, but there are a number of artists demonstrating quite deftly that light is a medium, too. Artist Darren Pearson is one such person. [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Five Tips to Get You Started as a Science Artist

13-047FEATURE

Last month, my co-blogger Glendon Mellow wrote a great summary for scientists who are wondering how to go about hiring science illustrators. It was received with open arms in the research community (cool, they seem receptive) and made me think of the many, many inquiries I get each year from emerging science illustrators who want [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Stone-faced Birds Staring Out From Beyond the Grave

13-045FEATURE

The best Halloween stories are true. There is a lake in Tanzania, Lake Natron, that is so hostile to life that only two species, alkaline tilapia and blue-green algae can live in its deadly waters. For the rest of us, its water is so caustic it will burn your lungs (and melt the ink off [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

SciArt on the Scene in Nov/Dec. 2013

13-049FEATURE

Ahhh, fall. Time to look for more indoor activities. And aren’t you lucky? Here’s a list of sciart exhibits that will warm your heart while you warm your toes. EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION CLIMATE CHANGE IN OUR WORLD: Photographs by Gary Braasch October 16, 2013 – July 6, 2014 Museum of Science 1 Science Park Boston, [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

A Mosaic of September SciArt Glory

13-044FEATURE

How many times do you have to do something before it is considered tradition? Last year, Glendon had the excellent idea to post a different #sciart image each day in the month of September. This year, we did it again and called it a blitz. In case you missed anything, here is a handy recap. [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Stellar Photography By A Citizen Astronomer

13-038FEATURE

By now you might be used to spectacular images of celestial bodies thanks to organizations like NASA and the ESA. But it’s still possible to be wowed by these images, especially when they’re taken by people like you and me. Citizen astronomer Alan Friedman takes breathtaking photographs of the sun’s roiling surface from his backyard [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Urban Wildlife in San Francisco Bay [PHOTOS]

20140218-IMG_2533

I think that hanging out in a heavily touristed area of San Francisco’s Embarcadero means that these California sea lions – one mature individual and one pup – qualify as urban wildlife. For good measure, here’s a western scrub jay and a pigeon.

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Camera Trap Tuesday: Islands in Los Angeles

debs bobcat4

“Is Griffith Park an island?” That’s the question that Miguel Ordeñana, a wildlife biologist at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles who also does field work in Nicaragua, wanted to know. Griffith Park isn’t surrounded by water. It’s not found offshore, like Catalina Island, and it isn’t encircled by a moat. What Griffith Park, [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Photoblogging: The Most Underrated of the African Megafauna

20131011-IMG_1749

It’s the hippo of course. Did you know that a fully grown hippo can bite a crocodile in half? Taken at the San Diego Zoo on October 11, 2013.

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Photoblogging: Gorilla Through Glass

gorilla portrait

One of the main challenges with photographing the non-human animals at the zoo is shooting through glass. Sometimes you just can’t get an angle without any glare, but sometimes it doesn’t matter. Photos taken October 11, 2013 at the San Diego Zoo. Top, with a Canon 60D and Canon 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 telephoto zoom lens. Bottom, [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Photoblogging: Muppet or Flamingo?

Flamingo

Sometimes, from just the right angle, a flamingo strongly resembles a muppet. Life imitates art, which imitates life. Photo taken July 14, 2013 at the San Diego Zoo with a Canon 60D and Canon 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 telephoto zoom lens. Previously: Photoblogging: Flamingo Family

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Photoblogging: The Giraffe is Not Impressed

Masai Giraffe

A Masai Giraffe lazily chews on some leaves at the San Diego Zoo. Photo taken July 14, 2013 at the San Diego Zoo with a Canon 60D and Canon 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 telephoto zoom lens.

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Photoblogging: Lazy Hyena

Sudanese Striped Hyena

A Sudanese Striped Hyena takes a nap at the San Diego Zoo. From the Thoughtful Animal Archives: Hyenas Give Up Eating Garbage for Lent, Hunt Donkeys Instead Silver Spoon Hyenas: Maternal Social Status Affects Male Reproductive Success Photo taken October 11, 2013 at the San Diego Zoo with a Canon 60D and Canon 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Photoblogging: Secretary Bird

secretary bird

Photo taken October 11, 2013 at the San Diego Zoo with a Canon 60D and Canon 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 telephoto zoom lens.

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Photoblogging: Portrait of a Meerkat

meerkat portrait

Meerkats are one of the few other species in the animal kingdom that has something close to human-like teaching. Read about it in an old piece of mine at BBC Future: Pay attention… time for lessons at animal school Photo taken October 11, 2013 at the San Diego Zoo with a Canon 60D and Canon [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Photoblogging: Airborne Pelicans

20130921-IMG_1362

It’s interesting what a small change in wing position does to a photo of a single bird. In this first photo of a Brown Pelican, Pelecanus occidentalis, the forward bend in the wings gives the bird a magnificent, almost regal quality. But the illusion of a slight backwards fold in the wings – really due [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Dinosaurs

Get Total Access to our Digital Anthology

1,200 Articles

Order Now - Just $39! >

X

Email this Article

X