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An Aphid Gets Egged

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.


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Can I feel Schadenfreude for an insect?

The blobs on stalks are eggs of a fierce aphid predator, the green lacewing. Lacewings typically attach eggs to vegetation, but the overzealous insect that laid these was frisky enough to oviposit directly on the back of a milkweed aphid.

Aphids will drop in response to threats, but this one is strung up by a stalk, waving in the breeze, and waiting for the predators to hatch.


photo details:
Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 macro lens + 12mm Kenko extension tube
Canon EOS 6D
ISO 1600, f/10, 1/125 sec, diffuse off-camera flash

Location: Urbana, Illinois

Alex Wild About the Author: Alex Wild is an Illinois-based entomologist who studies the evolutionary history of ants. In 2003 he founded a photography business as an aesthetic complement to his scientific work, and his natural history photographs appear in numerous museums, books, and media outlets. Follow on Twitter @myrmecos.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





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