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Posts Tagged "STEM education"

@ScientificAmerican

Videos for Executive Summit: Learning in the Digital Age

Mariette DiChristina, editor in chief and senior vice president of Scientific American, awarding the distinguished actor Alan Alda with the Scientific American Award for achievements in the public communication of science. Credit: Scientific American

What’s driving the digital revolution in education? And will it be a boon for students, helping the U.S. stay competitive in a global economy, as advocates say? Or, as critics say, will it improve only little on what teachers can do already—and threaten student privacy to boot? In the “Executive Summit: Learning in the Digital [...]

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Budding Scientist

Four Incredible Google Science Fair Projects

PALO ALTO, CALIF. – Eighteen impressive teenagers from around the world are gathered in Mountain View, California awaiting the results of the annual Google Science Fair. The finalists, from 8 countries including the United States, Singapore, Turkey, Greece and India, have collectively invented a flashlight that uses body heat for energy, a novel prosthetic hand, [...]

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Budding Scientist

Tools for Backyard Bug Hunters

The other day, I stumbled upon a company whose products I thought my 7-year-old daughter would love, and I ordered a few items so we could try them out. As many readers know, we spend a lot of our summers exploring the insects in my parents’ Massachusetts backyard. Backyard Safari makes inexpensive products for families [...]

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Budding Scientist

Adventurous Math For the Playground Set

Moebius Noodles cover

Guest post by math educators Maria Droujkova and Yelena McManaman, authors of the new family math book “Moebius Noodles: Adventurous Math for the Playground Crowd” Children dream big. They crave exciting and beautiful adventures and they love to pretend-play. Just ask them who they want to be when they grow up. The answers will run [...]

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Budding Scientist

Free Kits Help 10-Year-Olds See Their DNA

A DNA kit for children in grades 3 to 12, from the company Bio-Rad

  Invited Guest Post by Helene Brazier-Mitouart I have a Ph.D. in Cell Biology and Health and I am currently doing research in cancer biology as a postdoctoral associate at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. Besides having a passion for making scientific discoveries, I also have a great interest in teaching science [...]

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Budding Scientist

Students with Autism Gravitate Toward STEM Majors

Invited Guest Post by Marissa Fessenden (@marisfessenden) U.S. business and policy leaders have made it a priority to increase the number of students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering and math, collectively known as STEM. But one source of STEM talent is often overlooked: young people with autism spectrum disorders. A study published late last [...]

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Budding Scientist

Why America’s Kids Need New Standards for Science Education

Earlier today, a group of scientists, educators and policymakers released the newest draft of the Next Generation Science Standards, which lay out ambitious expectations for what elementary, middle and high school students should learn at each grade level. These guidelines affect virtually every child enrolled in public school, and advocates say they will revolutionize STEM [...]

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Budding Scientist

Hot Bots: How Arduino Teaches Kids the Science behind Modern Gizmos

Guest post by Michael R. Duffey There is a wide variety of creative projects which can help introduce children to the world of microcontrollers.  A microcontroller is simply a small computer that can interact with the outside world.  It can connect different types of “inputs” (such as sensing a motion, force, or temperature change) to [...]

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Budding Scientist

It’s Raining Caterpillars [video]

Last week, my parents’ yard in Western Massachusetts was overrun with fuzzy black and white creatures known as Hickory Tussock Moth caterpillars (Lophocampa caryae).  Just after a rainstorm, I noticed that the caterpillars were hanging from trees like spiders, lowering themselves from branches on lines of silk (see video below; apologies for the commentary in [...]

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The Scicurious Brain

Guest Post 6! Building STEM Bridges: Scientists Overcoming Isolation by Building Community

WilsonCB_Headshot_for_SciAM

Please Welcome Guest Post , from my old stomping grounds at U Penn, Caleph Wilson! Diversity has become a watchword in the scientific community. For the last 20 years colleges, universities, government science agencies and private foundations have worked to increase the numbers of scientists from under-represented backgrounds. Some of these policy changes have resulted [...]

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The Scicurious Brain

Guest Post 5: Accommodasians don’t make waves.

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Please welcome our fifth guest post, from AmasianV! In the aftermath of SciAm’s recent snafu handling of DNLee’s post, in which she recounted her interaction with an editor who called her an “urban whore,” Sci asked me to guest blog for a series of posts aimed at getting more diverse voices heard. Diversity? Voices? That’s [...]

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The Scicurious Brain

Guest Post 4! Don’t Just Assume You Should Know: How To Be An Excellent Mentor

800px-Buenos_Aires_at_night

Of course, latin-american foreigners are minorities in Pittsburgh. And that is totally fine. Yes, it can be challenging but also rewarding and awesome. I am originally from Colombia, where I did my undergrad. Back then, in my early 20’s I decided to go abroad. So, in 2008 I moved to Pittsburgh and I have found [...]

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The Scicurious Brain

Guest Post 3: If these blogs could talk: characterizing power, privilege, and everyday life in the sciences

microagress

Please welcome the next guest group, the Microaggression Tumblr! The discussions sparked by the recent removal of DNLee’s blog post about her treatment by a member of the scientific community is a great teaching moment on how marginalization in the sciences, or any sector of society, operates in everyday life. These incidents may seem specific [...]

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