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Posts Tagged "schizophrenia"

Beautiful Minds

The Real Link Between Creativity and Mental Illness

woman-writing-oil-on-linen-by-valerie-hardy-248x300

This blog appears in the In-Depth Report Genius, Suicide and Mental Illness: Insights into a Deep Connection “There is only one difference between a madman and me. I am not mad.” —Salvador Dali The romantic notion that mental illness and creativity are linked is so prominent in the public consciousness that it is rarely challenged. Researchers [...]

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Brainwaves

A Brief History of Mental Illness in Art

File:Master of Saint Bartholomew - Saint Bartholomew Exorcising - Google Art Project.jpg

“Historically, many cases of demonic possession have masked major psychiatric disorder[s].”-Kazuhiro Tajima-Pozo et. al. BMJ Case Reports 2009 “Juana (also known as Joanna and Joan) of Castile was born in Toledo, Spain on 6 November 1479, the third child of Queen Isabella of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon. Not long after her marriage [...]

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Brainwaves

No One Is Abandoning the DSM, but It Is Almost Time to Transform It

This month the American Psychiatric Association will publish the latest edition of its standard guidebook for clinicians, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 (DSM-5). In somewhat the same way that a field guide to birds helps people distinguish different species with illustrations and descriptions of physical features—a beak’s hooked tip, a blush [...]

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MIND Guest Blog

How I Recovered My Social Skills after Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia can seriously impair the ability to relate to people, but with effort, a degree of normalcy can be attained. As someone who lives with schizophrenia, this is glaringly obvious to me. When you have schizophrenia, the overarching plot of the experience is the inability to tell whether the things you are thinking are actually [...]

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Observations

Living with Voices inside Your Head

Eleanor Longden speaks at TED2013. Image courtesy of TED Conference via flickr.

Myths can be more harmful than lies, Nobel laureate Harry Kroto has said, because they are more difficult to recognize and often go unexamined. For many years, a diagnosis of schizophrenia was like a prison sentence, because many people (some of them in the medical profession) held to the notion that a schizophrenic could not [...]

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Observations

Field Tests for Revised Psychiatric Guide Reveal Reliability Problems for 2 Major Diagnoses

DSM

PHILADELPHIA—In the summer of 2011 I began working on a feature article about a book that most people have never heard of—the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), a reference guide for psychiatrists and clinicians. Most of the DSM‘s pages contain lists of symptoms that characterize different mental disorders (e.g. schizophrenia: delusions, hallucinations, [...]

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Observations

City Living Changes Brain’s Stress Response

stressed brain in urban environment

Cities can be stressful places, and are a far cry from the sparsely populated landscapes in which our prehistoric ancestors evolved. All of that noise, traffic, pollution and crowding has a well-documented impact on our mental health. People who live in cities are more likely to have mood or anxiety disorder (21 percent and 39 [...]

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Observations

New evidence for a neuronal link between insulin-related diseases and schizophrenia

diabetes psychiatric schizophrenia insulin dopamine

When the body does not properly manage insulin levels, diabetes and other metabolic disorders are familiar outcomes. That hormonal imbalance, however, has also been linked to a higher risk for psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. And a new study has uncovered a potential pathway by which this metabolic hormone can upset the balance of a [...]

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Observations

Schizophrenia shares genetic links with autism, genome study shows

schizophrenia gene brain autism dna geneitc

Schizophrenia involves some of the same genetic variations as autism and attention deficit disorders, a new whole-genome study has confirmed. Schizophrenia, which affects about 1.5 percent of the U.S. population, can result in a variety of symptoms that include disrupted thinking, hallucinations, delusions and abnormal speech. The disease is thought to have genetic links but [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

A Surefire Way to Sharpen Your Focus

peaceful scene, village by the water

How many times have you arrived someplace but had no memory of the trip there? Have you ever been sitting in an auditorium daydreaming, not registering what the people on stage are saying or playing? We often spin through our days lost in mental time travel, thinking about something from the past, or future, leaving [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Scientists Scan Children’s Brains for Answers to Mental Illness

kid practices getting her brain scanned

In a room tucked next to the reception desk in a colorful lobby of a Park Avenue office tower, kids slide into the core of a white cylinder and practice something kids typically find quite difficult: staying still. Inside the tunnel, a child lies on her back and looks up at a television screen, watching [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Why Are There No Biological Tests in Psychiatry?

Part 5 of a 5-part series By Allen Frances* When the third edition of psychiatry’s manual of mental illness, the DSM-III, was published 30 years ago, there was great optimism it would soon be the willing victim of its own success, achieving a kind of planned obsolescence. Surely, the combining of a reasonably reliable system [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Trouble at the Heart of Psychiatry’s Revised Rule Book

By Edward Shorter* Part 3 in a series One might liken the latest draft of psychiatry’s new diagnostic manual, the DSM-5, to a bowl of spaghetti. Hanging over the side are the marginal diagnoses of psychiatry, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism, important for certain subpopulations but not central to the discipline. At [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Science Remains a Stranger to Psychiatry’s New Bible

By Ferris Jabr* Part 2 of a series In the offices of psychiatrists and psychologists across the country you can find a rather hefty tome called the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM). The current edition of the DSM, the DSM-IV, is something like a field guide to mental disorders: the book pairs [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Psychiatrists Are About to Shift the Boundaries between Sane and Insane

We will soon find ourselves plagued by new forms of distress. No, it’s not the economy. It’s not that we are all becoming socially isolated because of Facebook (though it’s possible we are). Rather, doctors are about to redefine what it means to be mentally ill. A select clique of psychiatrists has been at work [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Surprising Truths about How We Think and Act

woman looking expectant

As an editor at Scientific American Mind, I get a sneak peak at a menu of surprises about us—people, that is—that each issue has to offer. As the March/April Mind makes its debut, I wanted to share my favorite brain food from its cognitive kitchen. Here are three not-to-miss messages from its pages. Later this [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Understanding Your Mind Is Mission Critical

cutaway of head revealing brain

Guest Blog by Jamil Zaki* Earlier this year, Senator Tom Coburn published a report called “Under the Microscope,” in which he criticized the funding of any research he couldn’t immediately understand as important. Of particularly dubious value, in Coburn’s opinion, are the behavioral and social sciences—including my own field, psychology. Following his report, Coburn proposed [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Crux of Schizophrenia’s Emotional and Social Deficits May Be Cognitive

Messages penned by a person with schizophrenia overlay the windows of this house

[PART 2 OF 2 BLOGS ON SCHIZOPHRENIA. PART 1.] Before he got sick, my Uncle Glenn attended MIT and earned a master’s degree in electrical engineering. For a while, he made a living designing machine languages to, for example, recognize print and convert it to Braille. At about age 25, he had his first psychotic [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Seeing Schizophrenia Before It’s Too Late

Embroidery by a person with schizophrenia

According to his two brothers, my uncle Glenn had always been a little odd. He was a quiet kid, and when he spoke—he talked at you, not to you. If he got excited, he might splay his fingers incongruously or his body would abruptly quiver. Never physically aggressive or mean, Glenn had friends—but not many. [...]

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Talking back

The Grand Challenge of Schizophrenia Drugs

A milestone for Big Neuroscience came Wednesday with the publication in Nature of a study on the way genes switch on across the whole human brain. Whole brain is all the vogue. Neuroscientists have devoted inordinate energy in recent years to publicize  the need for, not only gene maps, but for a full wiring diagram [...]

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The White Noise

Legalize Pot? The “Harmless” Drug and Schizophrenia

Cannabis

It was Harry’s fault, really. Before Harry, hemp had been a Mexico-America border problem. After Harry, hemp became marijuana and marijuana became illegal. Harry J. Anslinger commandeered the start today’s anti-narcotics law enforcement. But truthfully, he didn’t care much about hemp. He was hunting opiates and cocaine in the 1930s, until the Depression chopped his [...]

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