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"bacteria"63 articles archived since 1845

Fussy eaters: the favoured food of Salmonella

As antibiotic resistance increases the search for new anti-bacterial treatments becomes more and more important. One way to design anti-bacterials is to find specific biochemical pathways that the bacteria require to survive, and develop drugs that block off these pathways.

July 13, 2014 — S.E. Gould

Sauerkraut: bacteria making food

Last week my husband needed some jars for cooking purposes. Tesco sell jars for somewhere around £3 each. However they also sell large jars full of sauerkraut for £1 each.

July 26, 2014 — S.E. Gould

Lab Rat Lecture

Last month I had the privilege of being invited as a speaker for the Blogging Microbes event at the University of Nottingham. Hosted by Ivan Lafayette it was a great discussion of the role of blogs, twitter, and podcasts in communicating science, particularly microbiology, to a wider audience.

October 5, 2014 — S.E. Gould
Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 2

Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 2

Second part of my thinly veiled excuse to research X-men and call it work. The first post can be found here. This is only meant to be a two-parter but I’ll see how I feel on Monday, and whether I can find any more X-men that are as amazing as bacteria.

December 16, 2011 — S.E. Gould

Microbes and Pathogen Genes Fill New York City Soil

With all the attention to the Ebola virus and other pathogens floating around in bodily fluids and the air, we may not be aware that the dirt beneath our feet is home to thousands of bacteria and other microorganisms.

October 3, 2014 — Mark Fischetti
Rock-Eating Martian Microbes?

Rock-Eating Martian Microbes?

A recently published study of a 30-pound martian meteorite found in Antarctica suggests the presence of indigenous carbon-rich material, ancient water erosion, and a number of tiny structures that resemble the sort of features that we see rock-eating microbes leaving in basaltic glasses here on Earth.

February 28, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf
Bacteria in space!

Bacteria in space!

Where humans travel, bacteria will follow. If people are in space for any amount of time, bacteria are sure to thrive there so it’s good to know that there are already researchers looking at how the environment within spaceships affects bacterial populations.

February 16, 2014 — S.E. Gould

From the archives: Chameleon bacteria!

This post was originally published in “Life of a Lab Rat” on Wednesday 3rd February 2010. Chameleon bacteria This is a picture of a small cyanobacteria under red light: And this is a picture of exactly the same organism under blue-green light: Some cyanobacteria have the ability to change their colour depending on external conditions.

June 24, 2014 — S.E. Gould
The pathogen detectives: sourcing the post-earthquake cholera outbreak in Haiti

The pathogen detectives: sourcing the post-earthquake cholera outbreak in Haiti

Natural disasters such as earthquakes can have far-reaching effects beyond the damage caused on the day they occur. The 2010 earthquake in Haiti damaged the already limited sanitation systems leading to areas without adequate toilet and washing facilities; perfect for the spread of infection diseases.

April 6, 2014 — S.E. Gould
Fighting Cholera With Mass Vaccination

Fighting Cholera With Mass Vaccination

When studying bacteria it is quite easy to get fascinated with them as a laboratory specimen while forgetting the huge impact they can have in real life societies.

March 30, 2014 — S.E. Gould

Human Cheese and the Microbial Superhighway

Cheese is a fascinating model for studying the intersection of human and microbial cultures. My project with Sissel Tolaas explores these connections through the process of making cheese using microbes sampled from the human body.

October 28, 2013 — Christina Agapakis
What’s eating us?

What’s eating us?

As #SciAmFood week draws to a close, we’ve heard a lot about the food we consume, from not getting enough to astronaut nutrition (and getting too much) to tricking your brain about what it’s getting.

September 6, 2013 — Kevin Bonham
On the Curious Motions of Syphilis and Lyme Disease Bacteria

On the Curious Motions of Syphilis and Lyme Disease Bacteria

The bacteria that cause syphilis and Lyme Disease have something extraordinary in common: they manage to propel themselves through their environment in spite of the fact their tails are located inside their bodies.

December 28, 2013 — Jennifer Frazer