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Posts Tagged "art history"

Brainwaves

A Brief History of Mental Illness in Art

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“Historically, many cases of demonic possession have masked major psychiatric disorder[s].”-Kazuhiro Tajima-Pozo et. al. BMJ Case Reports 2009 “Juana (also known as Joanna and Joan) of Castile was born in Toledo, Spain on 6 November 1479, the third child of Queen Isabella of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon. Not long after her marriage [...]

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Roots of Unity

The Slowest Way to Draw a Lute

Man Drawing a Lute, by Albrecht Dürer. Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.

Last month, I went to a talk by mathematician Annalisa Crannell of Franklin and Marshall College called Math and Art: the good, the bad, and the pretty. She talked about how mathematical ideas of perspective show up in art and how it can help us create and appreciate art. One of my favorite parts of the [...]

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Symbiartic

Pinch of Pigment: Mummy Brown

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Many of the early Pre-Raphaelite paintings may have paint made from dead Egyptians. Considered to be a highly variable pigment between raw umber (almost greenish brown) and burnt umber (a ruddier brown), Mummy Brown was a transparent brown good for mixing. And it was appalling. Made from ancient Egyptian human and feline mummies grave-robbed investigated [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt on View in March/April 2014

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A fresh batch of exhibits combining science and art are going up around the country, plus, there’s still time to catch some of the longer running exhibits that go through the middle of 2014. From John J. Audubon to dark matter to hybrid bodies created with modern transplant technology, there’s something in here for everyone. [...]

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Symbiartic

20th-Century Math Hidden in 15th-Century Art

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Art and science are often thought of as disparate entities, drawing on different strengths and different ways of thinking. This is surely true, but the disciplines also share patterns of thought and essential characteristics. Take, for example, their inherently collaborative processes. No artist creates in a vacuum just as no scientists could perform the work [...]

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Symbiartic

How Plagiarized Art Sells for Millions

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Every now and again the stitching between fine art and technology looks a little more naked and pisses people off. So let’s scratch the scab and look at why. Yesterday one of my favorite cultural bloggers, Charlie Jane Anders posted this on io9: The story discusses the fine art paintings of Glenn Brown which are [...]

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Symbiartic

Five Tips to Get You Started as a Science Artist

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Last month, my co-blogger Glendon Mellow wrote a great summary for scientists who are wondering how to go about hiring science illustrators. It was received with open arms in the research community (cool, they seem receptive) and made me think of the many, many inquiries I get each year from emerging science illustrators who want [...]

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Symbiartic

A Mosaic of September SciArt Glory

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How many times do you have to do something before it is considered tradition? Last year, Glendon had the excellent idea to post a different #sciart image each day in the month of September. This year, we did it again and called it a blitz. In case you missed anything, here is a handy recap. [...]

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Symbiartic

Invasive Species Inhabit Painting

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  Looking at Symbolist Master Gustave Moreau’s Orphée I am struck by something. No, not the exquisitely beautiful severed head. The two box turtles hanging out in the corner, trying to be under the radar. I may not be a cheloniologist, but l think those are North American Box Turtles. Or possibly Indian Star Tortoises. Indian [...]

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Symbiartic

How to Destroy Priceless Works of Art

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So I’m furious and angry and sad about what happened to the paintings from the Rotterdam Kunsthal museum. If you don’t know, read on, I’ll get there. If blog post seems irreverent and tongue and cheek, call it a coping mechanism, dammit. How to Destroy Watercolours Often the simplest way to destroy watercolours is to [...]

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Symbiartic

Talking Atheism, Science and Art at FtBCon

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Today at 2pm Central, I’m excited to be taking part in FtBConscience: Atheism with a conscience, a free online conference hosted by the Freethought Blog Network. Naturally, I’ll be talking about art, science and atheism. Here’s the official blurb: Atheism, science and art 2pm – 3 pm Central Artists within the secular, scientific and skeptical [...]

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Symbiartic

Find All the Absurdities!

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A little blast from the past to puzzle over while your head spins from chocolate overload this weekend. Two centuries before M.C. Escher confounded us with his optical illusions and play on perspective, William Hogarth (1697-1764) created Satire on False Perspective. Hogarth was a British painter and engraver sometimes credited with beginning the tradition of [...]

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