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Posts Tagged "pregnancy"

Bering in Mind

Darwin’s Morning After Pill: How Couples Who Want Children Can Increase Their Chances

  If you’re desperate for a child but have been having trouble in this area, semen may be the solution to your reproductive woes. That may sound like the most obvious sentence ever written in the history of the English language, but sometimes beneath the most ancient truisms lie remarkable secrets. People have known semen [...]

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Bering in Mind

Puppy Pregnancy Syndrome: Men Who Think They Are Pregnant with Dogs

Are you suffering abdominal pain or discomfort, fatigue, nausea, flatulence, heartburn, and acid reflux? Have you been having difficulty urinating, or experiencing pain while doing so? Oh, and one other question—have you been spontaneously expelling microscopic bits of disintegrated dog fetuses through your urethra? If you answered “yes” to all of the above, then you may [...]

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Food Matters

Going gluten-free? Things to consider, part 1: Folate

Cereal Flakes

Last spring, I wrote a blog post for Scientific American’s guest blog about gluten sensitivity, a condition in which patients without celiac disease exhibit symptoms, such as bloating or fatigue, that improve with a gluten-free diet. Much controversy still exists in the media over whether non-celiacs should follow a gluten-free diet. Experts often note that [...]

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Guest Blog

Superfetation: Pregnant while already pregnant

Some weeks back, I came across a case report published in 1999 in the journal Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology [1]. It presented a twin pregnancy wherein one of the fetuses seemed to be at a younger developmental stage in its mother’s womb compared to its sibling. It wasn’t the first time that I had [...]

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Observations

Your Smartphone Just Diagnosed You with Postpartum Depression

depression

Depending on your perspective, Twitter can either be a valuable source of breaking news, or a fire hose of miscellaneous, often dubious information. Microsoft researchers are investigating whether the microblogging service could serve another, more scientific function—to spot signs of postpartum depression in new mothers based on changes in how and what they tweet. The [...]

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Observations

Free Birth Control, Reproductive Services for Women Starting August 1

free birth control preventive services august 1 aca

Since last August, I’ve been counting down the days until my 30th birthday this Wednesday. You see, I’ve got money coming my way—not just in the form of birthday checks from my grandmother and aunts—but an even larger chunk of change, spread out over the entire year. Starting August 1, I, along with millions of [...]

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Observations

Maternal Diabetes, Obesity During Pregnancy Might Raise Child’s Risk for Developmental Disorders

pregnancy obesity diabetes developmental disorder

Mothers-to-be know they must be extra vigilant about what they put in their bodies—avoiding too much seafood, and making sure they get plenty of fruits and vegetables, for instance. But research has been piling up suggesting that the mother’s overall weight and metabolic health before—and while—she is pregnant can also have a lasting impact on [...]

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Observations

Fewer Babies Die, but Many Suffer Long-Term Health Problems

premature infant

Infant mortality is at its lowest rate ever. Now fewer than three percent of babies worldwide die within the first five weeks of life, which is surely cause for celebration. Many of the infants who have been saved, however, did not enter this world easily. A new analysis published online Thursday in The Lancet found [...]

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Observations

New hope for preventing pre-term births

Newborn baby

It’s one of the great frustrations of obstetric medicine: humans have been reproducing for hundreds of thousands of years, and yet doctors still haven’t unraveled the mystery of why some women give birth well before their babies have fully developed in the womb. Despite researchers’ and physicians’ best efforts, the rate of preterm births—defined as [...]

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Observations

Not breast-feeding increases mothers’ risk for type 2 diabetes

The benefits of breast-feeding for babies have proved to be myriad, and an increasing number of studies are finding long-term health benefits for mothers, too, including reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and lower odds of some cancers. A new analysis confirms earlier observations that breast-feeding helps to decrease a mother’s risk of developing type 2 [...]

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Observations

Quitting smoking during pregnancy may not be enough to prevent harm to baby

Cigarette smoke plays an undisputed role in the development of lung and other cancers. Carcinogens in the smoke damage DNA, which often results in mutations in genes that promote the development of cancer. It’s also well known that secondhand smoke can have effects indistinguishable from active smoking. While maternal tobacco smoking has been associated with [...]

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Observations

Antiretroviral regimens drastically reduce breast milk HIV transmission between mothers and babies

woman with child in botswana, antiretrovirals cut the risk of mother-to-child transmission of hiv via breastfeeding

HIV infects an estimated 430,000 infants and children worldwide each year. Although many of those cases are contracted from an HIV-positive mother during pregnancy or birth, some 40 percent of infected children get the disease through breast-feeding. But because of health risks associated with formula feeding—especially in resource-poor regions—the World Health Organization still recommends breast-feeding [...]

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Observations

Pregnant male fish can choose to make good babies better or abort (and consume) them

male pregnant seahorse abort babies gulf pipefish

Sea horses and their cousins in the syngnathid group are the only known animals in which the male gets pregnant and bears the offspring. In these unusual reproductive circumstances, however, the next generation often does not thrive—or even survive. A new study of sea horse cousins called pipefish found that the males can be particular—and [...]

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