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"motivation"

Site Survey Shows 60 Percent Think Free Will Exists. Read Why.

We are responsible for our own actions. Of course we are. Sure about that? “I think I can?” “I think I can’t?” All philosophizing aside, the assumption that we have free will has been called into question by research that suggests our brains are deciding for us before we become conscious of the decisions streamed [...]

January 15, 2015 — Gary Stix
Take Care of Your Brainand Your Friendships

Take Care of Your Brainand Your Friendships

Fighting back emotion, Tony Dorsett, the former Dallas Cowboys running back, told ESPN last fall: Its painful, man, for my daughters to say theyre scared of meits painful.

January 7, 2014 — Ingrid Wickelgren

How to Avoid the Self-Esteem Trap

I have always assumed that having a strong sense of self-worth was important. I figured it made a person happier, healthier, more successful, and easier to be around.

August 9, 2013 — Ingrid Wickelgren
New Cognitive Training Study Takes on the Critics

New Cognitive Training Study Takes on the Critics

Brain training: yay or nay? It’s not so simple. Traversing the swamp of studies on cognitive training is bound to give even the boldest explorer a migraine.

October 9, 2013 — Scott Barry Kaufman
Repent for Your Sins—or Turn Them into Something Good

Repent for Your Sins—or Turn Them into Something Good

The November/December Scientific American Mind is a tribute to the seven deadly sins. Not that gluttony, envy, greed, sloth, wrath, lust and pride are necessarily laudable traits, but we can learn a lot from them.

October 24, 2013 — Ingrid Wickelgren
Teen Builds Gateway to the Brain for Girls

Teen Builds Gateway to the Brain for Girls

The Synapse Project “encourages young women to enter the field of neuroscience through information and mentorship,” according to its website.

November 6, 2013 — Ingrid Wickelgren
Why Education Needs More Radioactive Spiders

Why Education Needs More Radioactive Spiders

Education needs more radioactive spiders. Stay with me. Remember Peter Parker? His childhood wasn’t easy. Both of his parents– Richard and Mary– were killed on a mission as double agents.

September 9, 2013 — Scott Barry Kaufman

If obesity is a disease, is labeling it that way the cure?

My final guest post at the BPS Research Digest went up on Friday, covering recent work by psychologists Crystal Hoyt, Jeni Burnette, and Lisa Auster-Gussman on the motivational implications of formally classifying obesity as a “disease,” as the American Medical Association did in July 2013.

May 5, 2014 — Melanie Tannenbaum