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Posts Tagged "entertainment"

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Star Trek’s LeVar Burton to Be Scientific American Guest Web Editor June 11

LeVar Burton

NuqneH! Buy’ ngop! That’s “greetings” and “good news” in Klingon. These otherworldly tidings seem like a fitting way to let you know that LeVar Burton, who played the U.S.S. Enterprise’s chief engineer Geordi La Forge on Star Trek: The Next Generation, will be guest editor of Scientific American’s Web site on Wednesday, June 11. Burton [...]

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Beautiful Minds

Profiling Serial Creators

bored_student

Every single day, all across the globe, extraordinarily creative and talented students sit in our classrooms bored out of their minds. These budding innovators may differ drastically in what particular domain captivates their attention, whether it’s science and engineering, architecture and design, arts, music and entertainment, business and finance, law, or health care. Nevertheless, as Richard Florida [...]

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But Seriously...

Annalee Newitz: Where did io9 get its name?

Annalee Newitz and Brian Malow

Today is Annalee Newitz‘s birthday (well, it’s still today in the most relevant time zone – uh, hers not mine). Annalee has been writing about the intersection of science and technology and culture for many years. It’s a busy intersection. Since 2008, she’s been editor-in-chief of one of my favorite websites, io9.com. If you don’t [...]

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Life, Unbounded

The Hole

Hole ((c) C. Scharf 2012)

Every so often in the summer months I allow myself a bit of leeway with posts, because as fun as it is to write about real science, it’s also a lot of fun to write pure speculation. I particularly like speculation that takes extraordinary possibilities about our place in the universe, and cuts them down [...]

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Observations

The Oculus Rift Virtual Reality Headset Is Amazing—It’s Also a Work in Progress

A couple days ago I found myself sitting in a digital cave with an enormous fire-eating hell-demon. Naturally, I was at the annual Consumer Electronics Show. I had just strapped a black box of brain-scrambling equipment to my face. I looked up and saw a cavern ceiling high above me. I peered over my shoulder [...]

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Observations

Google Doodle’s Galloping Steed Commemorates Pioneering Photographer Edward Muybridge

Today’s Google doodle pays homage to the photography of Eadweard J. Muybridge, pioneering photographer and inventor of the zoopraxiscope. If he had somehow survived to witness the multimedia era, Muybridge would be marking his 182nd birthday. The running horse video, which replaces the Google logo today, comes from Muybridge’s most famous photographic experiment. Renowned for [...]

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Observations

One pill makes you smarter: The myths of the meat machine

Neuroscience gets invoked these days to explain virtually any behavior—from the actions of Wall Street traders to a "God gene" that makes us devout. The term "neuromyths" has even emerged as a collection of fibs about how the brain works. The biggest neuromyth, of course, is that we only use 10 percent of our brain. [...]

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Observations

A U.C.L.A. physicist dishes on his work as science consultant for The Big Bang Theory

David Saltzberg

Battlestar Galactica is over. Numb3rs tanked. But there’s still The Big Bang Theory on CBS, a sitcom featuring the daily dust-ups of four young physicists and their blonde waitress friend, if you must have science mixed into your small-screen fare. "It’s not Hollywood, it’s Burbank," physicist David Saltzberg explained to a crowd of 150 or [...]

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