ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "development"

Anthropology in Practice

Marbles Lost, Marbles Found: Children’s Games and Consequences

I used to be a crack shot at pitch (marbles) as a kid. I learned from my dad. We’d draw a circle with a piece of chalk, and “pitch” our taws at each other’s pieces, which is how the game gets its name in Trinidad. Our goal was to knock each other’s pieces out of [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Cooperation Is Child’s Play

Cooperation confounds us: Humans are the only members of the animal kingdom to display this tendency to the extent that we do, and it’s an expensive endeavor with no guarantee of reciprocal rewards. While we continue to look for answers about how and why cooperation may have emerged in human social and cultural evolution, we [...]

Keep reading »
@ScientificAmerican

Now: Bring Science Home Every Week!

bring science home logo

At Scientific American, we appreciate the value of a good experiment. So in May, we launched Bring Science Home as a series of free science activities for parents to do together with their six- to 12-year-old kids. We made sure the activities would be fun and easy to do, so families could complete them in [...]

Keep reading »
Beautiful Minds

Why Education Needs More Radioactive Spiders

andrew-garfield-the-amazing-spider-man-image-4

Education needs more radioactive spiders. Stay with me. Remember Peter Parker? His childhood wasn’t easy. Both of his parents– Richard and Mary– were killed on a mission as double agents. Raised by his Uncle Ben and Aunt May in Queens, Peter spent most of his childhood without an identity. Now, Peter was a good student. [...]

Keep reading »
Beautiful Minds

Is Your Child Ungifted?

PROLOGUE

  When Jay Leno asked Steve Carell how his kids were doing, he didn’t seem too concerned: “I hate it when people talk about kids on talk shows. I hate it, because every person who talks about their kids, their kids are obviously the most intelligent and the cutest. They’re all very, very gifted children. Ask [...]

Keep reading »
Beautiful Minds

Reasoning Training Increases Brain Connectivity Associated with High-Level Cognition

Illustrator: George Doutsiopoulos

A number of studies across various domains– from juggling to taxi navigation to meditation to music to motor learning to processing speed– demonstrate the importance of experience on patterns of neural connectivity. Finally, the cognitive ability domain is catching up. In recent years, neuroscientists have discovered a large-scale brain network critical for novel and complex goal-directed [...]

Keep reading »
MIND Guest Blog

Emotional Needs in Teens May Spur the Growth of New Brain Cells

Until recent decades, the brain was viewed as static. The accepted scientific view was that after early childhood few changes occurred in the connections between neurons and no new brain cells appeared. A new, dynamic model of the brain has emerged from this fixed model. This transition was marked, first by scientific acceptance of the [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Leggy Robot (Almost) Moves Like Jagger

In popular fiction, humanoid robots have no rhythm—look no further than the “robot dance” for evidence of this. Yet rhythm—or the neurophysiological processes that enable humans to produce patterns of recurring movement—is the key to creating bots that move more like people. So says a team of University of Arizona engineers who claim to have [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Searching for the Onset of Autism

Diffusion Tensor Image of Brain at Risk for Autism

Early behavioral intervention has shown some promise as a way to help children with autism. But it’s difficult to see the hallmarks of autism before two years of age with today’s diagnostic criteria. Could we find other methods? Seeking to answer that question is Jed Elison at the California Institute of Technology, who is working [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Common Pesticide “Disturbs” the Brains of Children

chemical-spraying-agriculture

Banned for indoor use since 2001, the effects of the common insecticide known as chlorpyrifos can still be found in the brains of young children now approaching puberty. A new study used magnetic imaging to reveal that those children exposed to chlorpyrifos in the womb had persistent changes in their brains throughout childhood. The brains [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

India’s City Dwellers at Greater Risk Than Americans for Heart Disease

india city heart disease risk

Diabetes, heart disease, stroke and other afflictions that once primarily plagued wealthier, western countries are now accelerating in poorer nations. A new study reveals that risk factors for heart disease in Indian cities are now more prevalent than they are in the U.S. or Western Europe per capita. And with a population of more than [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Maternal Diabetes, Obesity During Pregnancy Might Raise Child’s Risk for Developmental Disorders

pregnancy obesity diabetes developmental disorder

Mothers-to-be know they must be extra vigilant about what they put in their bodies—avoiding too much seafood, and making sure they get plenty of fruits and vegetables, for instance. But research has been piling up suggesting that the mother’s overall weight and metabolic health before—and while—she is pregnant can also have a lasting impact on [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Post-Conflict Libya and Iraq Should Now Wage War on Diabetes and Heart Disease

demonstration in libya

In a chaotic Libya or a post-war Iraq, achieving individual safety and the most basic of health care might seem to be the best any government or aid organization could hope for. But areas in transition and those still tending to the societal wounds of war are actually well poised to combat chronic conditions, such [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Income and Health Inequalities Cut U.S.’s High Marks for Development

un development index

If global development were a horse race, would you put your money on the slow-and-steady contenders or a fast new contender? With this year’s results just in, the old stalwart Scandinavian countries are still in the lead, according to the 2011 United Nations’ Human Development Index, published Wednesday. With Norway leading the charge in this [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Now: Bring Science Home Every Week!

bring science home logo

At Scientific American, we appreciate the value of a good experiment. So in May, we launched Bring Science Home as a series of free science activities for parents to do together with their six- to 12-year-old kids. We made sure the activities would be fun and easy to do, so families could complete them in [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Preschool Funding for Kids Now Pays Off Billions Later

preschooler playing

There are few sure investments in this chaotic economic climate, but on a national level, education has proven to pay off big down the road. As tight economic times have put the squeeze on education budgets here in the U.S., a new report shows the big benefits of even small investments in early education worldwide. [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

How do we solve energy poverty?

Each year, human civilization consumes some 14 terawatts of power, mostly provided by burning the fossilized sunshine known as coal, oil and natural gas. That’s 2,000 watts for every man, woman and child on the planet. Of course, power isn’t exactly distributed that way. In fact, roughly two billion people lack reliable access to modern [...]

Keep reading »
Octopus Chronicles

Baby Octopuses: Pickier Eaters Than Baby Humans

baby octopus food

Baby octopuses are notoriously difficult to keep alive in captivity—as in, almost impossible. Like their adult parents, they’re sensitive to water pH and temperature and all of that jazz. But unlike grown octopuses in captivity, the babies almost always die of starvation. Often just within a few days of hatching. We humans have tried feeding [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

For the Holidays: Gingerbread Zoning Suggestions

ginger

The obvious strain on gingerbread houses,  jelleybean-and-honey fastening products, and other sugar-based infrastructure systems brings them to our attention during the holiday season. With the increasing efforts made in city and regional planning to maximize resources, minimize environmental effects, and improve livability through pedestrian access and human-scale development, many in the development community have expressed [...]

Keep reading »
Streams of Consciousness

Scientists Scan Children’s Brains for Answers to Mental Illness

kid practices getting her brain scanned

In a room tucked next to the reception desk in a colorful lobby of a Park Avenue office tower, kids slide into the core of a white cylinder and practice something kids typically find quite difficult: staying still. Inside the tunnel, a child lies on her back and looks up at a television screen, watching [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Back To School

Back to School Sale!

12 Digital Issues + 4 Years of Archive Access just $19.99

Order Now >

X

Email this Article

X