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"exoplanets"29 articles archived since 1845

A Blizzard of Astrobiology

A Blizzard of Astrobiology

Astrobiology has one key advantage when it comes to tooting its own horn – it can lay claim to a diverse range of scientific research as being relevant to the study of life in the universe.

March 9, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf

The Top 10 Space and Physics Stories of 2014

From humanity’s first, flawed foray to the surface of a comet to the celebrated discovery of (and less celebrated skepticism about) primordial gravitational waves, 2014 has brought some historic successes and failures in space science and physics.

December 22, 2014 — Lee Billings

What "Interstellar" Gets Wrong about Interstellar Travel

Christopher Nolan’s new film, Interstellar, is a near-future tale of astronauts departing a dying Earth to travel to Saturn, then through a wormhole to another galaxy, all in search of somewhere else humanity could call home.

November 12, 2014 — Lee Billings
Mars, Ancient Water, Deep Hydrogen, and Life

Mars, Ancient Water, Deep Hydrogen, and Life

Two billion year-old water pockets and a revised deep hydrogen content are good news for Earth’s vast subsurface biosphere, and could offer clues to life on Mars and much further beyond.

December 18, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf

Planet Hunters Bet Big on a Small Telescope to See Alien Earths

In 1990, NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft briefly looked back from its journey out of the solar system, capturing a view of the faraway Earth. Carl Sagan called it the "pale blue dot." From more than 6 billion kilometers away, beyond the orbit of Pluto, it seemed remarkable that our planet was even visible.

January 27, 2015 — Lee Billings
The Cusp of Knowing and the Evolution of Science

The Cusp of Knowing and the Evolution of Science

In a nice piece on his Scientific American blog ‘Cross-Check‘, John Horgan recently gave me some much appreciated praise, whilst provoking discussion on a contentious subject – whether or not big science as we’ve known it ‘may be coming to an end’ (John’s words).

November 25, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf

The Great Alien Debate (Part 1)

This post is one in a series covering, and expanding on, topics in the book The Copernicus Complex (Scientific American/FSG).           The conversation usually goes like this: Do you think we’re alone in the universe?

August 26, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf
Live Chat at Noon Today on “Dreams of Other Worlds” and NASA’s Next Mars Mission

Live Chat at Noon Today on “Dreams of Other Worlds” and NASA’s Next Mars Mission

Robotic exploration of space is fascinating, complex and quite important to our understanding of the universe. To learn more about how scientists and engineers overcome challenges of robotic space exploration for successful data collection, join us for a live chat today (Tuesday, October 29) at noon EDT with Chris Impey, astronomer and author of Dreams of [...]

October 29, 2013 — THE EDITORS

The Copernicus Complex: A Primer

In a month’s time, the end result of two-and-a-half years of research, thinking, writing, re-writing, re-re-writing, editing, mulling, puzzling, coffee-drinking, beer-swilling, swearing, and tweaking will hit the shelves in the form of my new book The Copernicus Complex.

August 5, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf

5 Amazing Exoplanets – The Countdown, Episode 33

  More to explore: Exoplanet colour confirmed for first time: it’s blue, but not pale — and nothing like Earth (Scientific American Blog Network) http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/b… Diamond ‘Super-Earth’ May Not be Quite as Precious (University of Arizona) http://uanews.org/story/diamond-super… Strange Exoplanet’s ‘Backwards’ Orbit Explained by Extra Star, Planet (Space.com) http://www.space.com/19421-backward-a… Astronomers Find Most Ancient Planet Yet (Scientific [...]

October 18, 2013 — Eric R. Olson

The Great Martian Storm of ’71

                          On November 14th 1971 NASA’s Mariner 9 became the first spacecraft to successfully orbit another planet.

October 21, 2013 — Caleb A. Scharf
Notes From The Frontier: Life’s Origins

Notes From The Frontier: Life’s Origins

I spent some of last week at a fascinating and lively symposium on the origins of life and the search for life in the universe, held at the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) at the Tokyo Institute of Technology.

January 21, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf

Twin Earth May Be Better Than Earth for Life

Pseudo-Earths are out there. That's the message of today's exciting announcement that a planet about the same size as Earth lives in its star's habitable zone--the temperate region around a star where liquid water might flow.

April 17, 2014 — Michael Moyer
Copernicus in Cleveland

Copernicus in Cleveland

What is our cosmic significance? Does it even make sense to ask a question like that? If you happen to find yourself in Cleveland, Ohio this coming Thursday evening, and stop by the Cleveland Museum of Natural History at 8pm you can catch me talking about this.

April 14, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf
Besides Higgs, Who Might Get the Physics Nobel?

Besides Higgs, Who Might Get the Physics Nobel?

Tomorrow’s Nobel Prize in physics is widely anticipated to go to Peter Higgs, perhaps along with Francois Englert, for their nearly 50-year-old prediction of a new particle that we now call the Higgs boson.

October 7, 2013 — Michael Moyer

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