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Posts Tagged "women in science"

@ScientificAmerican

A Message from Mariette DiChristina, Editor in Chief

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Scientific American bloggers lie at the heart of the SA website, pumping vitality, experience and broad insight around the community. Unfortunately our poor communication with this valuable part of the SA network over the recent days has led to concerns, misunderstandings and ill feelings, and we are committed to working to try to put this [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Science in Action Winner for 2013: Elif Bilgin

Elif Bilgin, winner of the 2013 Science in Action award, a $50,000 prize sponsored by Scientific American as part of the Google Science Fair.

“Genius,” Thomas Edison famously said, “is 1 percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.” He would have found a kindred spirit in Elif Bilgin, 16, of Istanbul, Turkey, winner of the 2013 $50,000 Science in Action award, part of the third annual Google Science Fair. The award honors a project that can make a practical difference [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

The Banana That Gave Its All for Science [Video]

Magicians need to resort to trick props to pull a rabbit out of a hat. But we pulled DNA out of a banana with nothing more than a few household ingredients during a Scientific American Google Hangout on December 20. (See Scientific American Goes Bananas on December 20. No artifice or foolery was involved: just [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

SA Biology Blogger Wins L’Oreal for Women in Science Fellowship

Christina Agapakis

The Miss America pageant is often judged to be somewhat of an insult to women. So I was once surprised to learn that the Miss America Organization is the world’s largest provider of scholarship assistance to younger women. A total of $45 million in cash and scholarships was given out last year by MAO and [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

A Busy 2011 at Scientific American

When I wrote my end-of-the-year update for staff, Bora Zivkovic, our chief blogs editor, reminded me that others are also interested in the goings on at Scientific American. It’s never a good idea to say no to Bora. So here’s a summary of some highlights for 2011: AWARDS We won a 2011 National Magazine Award [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Scientific American Defends Marie Curie—and Women Scientists—in 1911

One of the pleasures of editing a magazine like Scientific American, with its 166-year history as the country’s longest continuously published magazine, is getting a “you are there” view of science as it was whenever I take a spin through our digital archives. The other day, while reading some 100-year-old prose, I was reminded of [...]

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Doing Good Science

Pub-Style Science: exclusion, inclusion, and methodological disputes.

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This is the second part of my transcript of the Pub-Style Science discussion about how (if at all) philosophy can (or should) inform scientific knowledge-building, wherein we discuss methodological disputes, who gets included or excluded in scientific knowledge-building, and ways the exclusion or inclusion might matter. Also, we talk about power gradients and make the [...]

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Doing Good Science

Nature and trust.

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Here are some things that I know: Nature is a high-impact scientific journal that is widely read in the scientific community. The editorial mechanisms Nature employs are meant to ensure the quality of the publication. Reports of scientific research submitted to Nature undergo peer review (as do manuscripts submitted to other scholarly scientific journals). As [...]

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Doing Good Science

Join Virtually Speaking Science for a conversation about sexism in science and science journalism.

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Today at 5 P.M. Eastern/2 P.M. Pacific, I’ll be on Virtually Speaking Science with Maryn McKenna and Tom Levenson to discuss sexual harassment, gender bias, and related issues in the world of science, science journalism, and online science communication. Listen live online or, if you have other stuff to do in that bit of spacetime, [...]

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Doing Good Science

On allies.

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Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. –George Santayana All of this has happened before, and all of this will happen again. –a guy who turned out to be a Cylon Let me start by putting my cards on the table: Jamie Vernon is not someone I count as an ally. [...]

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Doing Good Science

On the labor involved in being part of a community.

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On Thursday of this week, registration for ScienceOnline Together 2014, the “flagship annual conference” of ScienceOnline opened (and closed). ScienceOnline describes itself as a “global, ongoing, online community” made up of “a diverse and growing group of researchers, science writers, artists, programmers, and educators —those who conduct or communicate science online”. On Wednesday of this [...]

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Doing Good Science

The ethics of admitting you messed up.

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Part of any human endeavor, including building scientific knowledge or running a magazine with a website, is the potential for messing up. Humans make mistakes. Some of them are the result of deliberate choices to violate a norm. Some of them are the result of honest misunderstandings, or of misjudgments about how much control we [...]

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Doing Good Science

Standing with DNLee and “discovering science”.

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This post is about standing with DNLee and discovering science. In the event that you haven’t been following the situation as it exploded on Twitter, here is the short version: DNLee was invited to guest-blog at another site. She inquired as to the terms, then politely declined. The editor then soliciting those guest-posts called her [...]

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Doing Good Science

Teaching chemistry while female: when my very existence was a problem.

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Not quite 20 years ago, I was between graduate programs. I had earned my Ph.D in chemistry and filed my applications to seven Ph.D. programs in philosophy. (There were some surreal moments on the way to this, including retaking the GRE two weekends after defending my chemistry dissertation — because, apparently, the GRE is a [...]

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Doing Good Science

“There comes a time when you have to run out of patience.”

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In this post, I’m sharing an excellent short film called “A Chemical Imbalance,” which includes a number of brief interviews with chemists (most of them women, most at the University of Edinburgh) about the current situation for women in chemistry (and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, or STEM, more generally) in the UK. Here’s the [...]

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Doing Good Science

Professional communities, barriers to inclusion, and the value of a posse.

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Last week, I wrote a post about an incident connected to a professional conference. A male conference-goer wrote a column attempting to offer praise for a panel featuring four female conference-goers but managed to package this praise in a way that reinforced sexist assumptions about the value women colleagues add to a professional community. The [...]

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Guest Blog

Breaking Brick Stereotypes: LEGO Unveils a Female Scientist

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It’s 11:47 am on the Sunday before Labor Day, and I’m staking out a LEGO store inside a Byzantine shopping mall on the outskirts of Boston. I am here with a coterie of children and parents, the lot of us waiting impatiently while three LEGO associates in black shirts and khakis make their last-minute preparations [...]

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Guest Blog

Can we declare victory for women in their participation in science? Not yet

"When will we know when we can declare victory? For years I proceeded on the assumption that victory was equal participation of men and women in all branches of science and engineering. Today I’m not so sure…. It’s possible that we will come to understand that some fraction of the asymmetries in the distribution of [...]

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Roots of Unity

Mathematics, Live: A Conversation with Victoria Booth and Trachette Jackson

This is the second in a series of interviews I have been doing for the Association for Women in Mathematics. (You can read my first interview, with dynamicists Laura DeMarco and Amie Wilkinson, here.) In my interviews, I’m “listening in” on a conversation between two women mathematicians. I talked with mathematical biologists Victoria Booth and [...]

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Roots of Unity

Mathematics+Motherhood: An Interview with Constance Leidy

Mathematician Constance Leidy and her daughter. Image: Constance Leidy.

This is a guest post from Lillian Pierce, who has been doing an interview series for the Association for Women in Mathematics. Her series has focused on women who are balancing motherhood with their mathematical careers. I found her interview with Constance Leidy very interesting, and I am grateful to Drs. Pierce and Leidy for [...]

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Roots of Unity

Introducing the Blog on Math Blogs

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I’m pleased to introduce a new American Mathematical Society blog: the Blog on Math Blogs! Over there, my co-editor Brie Finegold and I are featuring posts from around the math blogosphere to help you keep up with math news and find new math blogs to follow. We’ve been around for about two months now, and [...]

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Roots of Unity

Mathematics, Live: A Conversation with Laura DeMarco and Amie Wilkinson

"Concealed within his fortress, the lord of Mordor sees all. His gaze pierces cloud, shadow, earth, and flesh. You know of what I speak, Gandalf: a great Eye, lidless, wreathed in flame."

This year I’ve been co-writing “Mathematics, Live,” an interview series for the Association for Women in Mathematics newsletter. In my interviews I’m “listening in” on conversations between pairs of female mathematicians. The first interview appeared in the May/June issue of the newsletter (password required). In it, I talked with mathematicians Laura DeMarco of the University [...]

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Roots of Unity

Two Evelyns and a Katie: a Snapshot from AAAS

Evelyns from Texas will take over the world

When I was at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Boston last week, I popped by the American Junior Academy of Science poster session featuring the work of high school scientists. I’ll admit one of the reasons was because I saw an Evelyn from Texas in the abstract booklet. Being rather [...]

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Roots of Unity

Knotty Fun at the Joint Math Meetings

Anyone with necklaces or lace-up shoes has some first-hand experience with knots, but believe it or not (knot?), there is an entire mathematical discipline dedicated to studying knots and some closely related concepts. A mathematical knot is almost like a real-world knot, but it can’t have any ends. So if you’re thinking of a shoelace, [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

On the lack of women in science: Numbers do matter

Henrietta Swan Leavitt, even today an underappreciated female scientist, but whose work led directly to the discovery of the expansion of the Universe (Image: Wikipedia)

There is an excellent article on the lack of women in science in the NYT by Eileen Pollack which is worth your time. Pollack herself was an embattled physics major at Yale at one point so she is quite well-versed in these issues. Using her own experience as a springboard she explores three of Yale’s [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

Book Review: Mireya Mayor’s “Pink Boots and a Machete”

As a child – okay, even still as an adult – I couldn’t get enough of adventure stories with animals at the center, whether in text or on the screen. Jack London’s Call of the Wild comes to mind, or Disney’s The Jungle Book. More recently, books like Bonobo Handshake, by Vanessa Woods (see my [...]

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