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Posts Tagged "scientific american"

Anthropology in Practice

What will the future of education look like?

In the absence of a traditional classroom, learning goes on in Mexico. | Image by JIji Lee. Click for license and information.

Scientific American’s August supplement takes a look at the changing landscape of education in the face of emerging technology, and asks the question, how do we increase interest and engagement in STEM initiatives? Learning in the Digital Age tackles issues of using big data to better understand students, the validity of online courses, and the [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

True Calling Interview: Anthropology in a Non-Traditional Path

Krystal

Last week I was interviewed by Renee Masur of Sokanu as part of the “True Calling” series, which looks at people who have found careers (allegedly) doing things they love. I am definitely fortunate to be one of those people, although my path has been far from the norm. I get to meld anthropology with [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

What Differentiates a Twitter Mob from a Twitter Mob?

What defines a mob? | Image by jinterwas, CC.

Brevity may be the soul of wit, but what does wit matter if no one’s listening? On Twitter the potential exists for many people to listen even if they aren’t connected. The reach of Twitter creates the possibility of a shared experience that extends well beyond the immediate network of a user: When the Japanese [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Meet the Science in Action Finalists, Part 1: Preventing damage from earthquakes, modular house plan for water conservation, and a frictionless electricity generator

On August 6, the winner of the third annual $50,000 Scientific American Science in Action Award powered by the Google Science Fair, will be announced. In this blog series we ask the students behind the projects to describe their work and themselves. First up, five teens from India, Singapore, Indonesia, Russia and Egypt. Name: Dev Shaurya Singhal [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Instant Egghead Cracks Up [Video]

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If you haven’t seen it before, “Instant Egghead” is Scientific American’s ongoing series of short and (hopefully) entertaining explainer videos. Each episode features a Scientific American editor or contributor expounding on topics ranging from particle physics to the environment to weird bodily phenomena. As Instant Egghead‘s producer, I had an important decision to make when [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Learn More about Courses from Scientific American and N.Y.U.-Poly

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Since 1845, Scientific American has shared the wonders of science with lifelong learners as the country’s oldest continuously published magazine. It’s in our DNA. In the first issue, the editors explained about Scientific American: “As a family newspaper, it will convey more useful intelligence to children and young people than five times its cost in [...]

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Dog Spies

Dog Farts Part 1: What Are Dog Farts Made Of?

2006-03-04 - United Kingdom - England - London - Green - Door - Sign - warning explosive dog farts

Ever since the children’s book Walter the Farting Dog hit bookstores in 2001, even the youngest members of our species know the truth. Dogs fart. They pass gas. Science-minded folk might refer to it as ‘flatus’ (not to be confused with flautas, which might or might not give you flatus). Whatever you call it, dog [...]

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Dog Spies

Happiness The Dog Way

wendy74ca Paws on the Run

Wishing you all happiness, smiles and gratitude. May your day be filled with a good dose of your version of this: Thank you for joining me in the land of canine science! Julie ——- Photo: Copyright Paws on the Run Photography. Used with Permission.

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Dog Spies

Dogs in Pantyhose

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Until recently, the only association I made between dogs and pantyhose would have involved an unfortunate trip to the vet. Of the inanimate objects pulled from pets’ gastrointestinal tracts — from drywall and hearing aids to corn cobs and toy cars — pantyhose, and their cousins, socks and underwear, top the list. But last week, [...]

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Dog Spies

Spying on Dogs: Intrigue, Drama and Science

Taste-testing. © Julie Hecht Dogs don’t write. At least not in a way easily understood by people, and certainly not with a pen or pencil. You could argue that dogs “write” with their urine. Some dogs seem quite familiar with Morse code — evident by a trail of little plops left behind — while others [...]

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Food Matters

What Is Success?

Says the Raven. PHOTO BY ARJAN RAVEN

“Goodbye don’t mean gone.” – attributed to Ray Charles “Everywhere I go, I’m asked if I think the universities stifle writers. My opinion is that they don’t stifle enough of them.” – Flannery O’Connor When New York calls, you listen, you go. That’s what two decidedly non-scientist role models in my life, Ray Charles and [...]

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Observations

G+ Hangout at Noon: Zombie Tits, Ungifted and Animal Wise Authors Win Scientific American’s Summer Reading Poll

Join our G+ Hangout On Air at noon today (Friday, July 26) with the three winning authors, here: G+ Hangout on Air with Virginia Morell, Rebecca Crew and Scott Barry Kaufman, hosted by SA blogger Joanne Manaster The votes are in for Scientific American’s poll in which we asked readers to choose their favorite authors [...]

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Observations

Why 167 Is a Happy Number—Besides Being Scientific American‘s Age

On Tuesday, Scientific American turns 167 years old. It doesn’t exactly look like the kind of anniversary we usually celebrate, with our decimal normative number system that overvalues ending zeroes and fives, but 167 is a pretty neat number. First of all, we can insert two symbols into it to get a correct mathematical statement: [...]

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Observations

Magazines Are iPads That Do Not Work [Video]

This is what the post-Jobs generation thinks of print magazines: On that note, stay tuned for more digital offerings from Scientific American in the coming weeks and months. (Until then, please enjoy our apps Journey to the Exoplanets and Origins and Endings, which we’re quite proud of.) (via @laughingsquid)

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Observations

Timeline Showcases Life of Scientific American Founder for Magazine’s 166th Anniversary

Scientific American, the oldest continuously published magazine in the U.S., turns 166 years old on August 28, thanks in part to a New England man who decided to use the latest communications technology available in 1845, the printing press, to tell readers about more of the latest, and sometimes weirdest (or so it looks now), [...]

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Observations

Welcome to Scientific American ‘s Citizen Science initiative!

scientific american, citizen science

You don’t need an advanced degree in physics or biology to participate in scientific research, just a curiosity about the world around you and an interest in observing, measuring and reporting what you hear and see. The Internet makes it easy these days to take part as an amateur in sophisticated science projects around the [...]

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Observations

A 2.4-degree C rise by 2020? Probably not

earth

Climate change is happening faster than scientists’ predicted. Meltdowns in Greenland and Antarctica are well ahead of climate science projections and overall warming continues to accelerate—we have just endured the hottest year and hottest decade on record. About the only thing that isn’t happening faster than expected is increasing concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse [...]

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Observations

Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina named AAAS fellow

A quick shout-out to our Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina, who this week was elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for the section on General Interest in Science and Engineering. She is being honored for distinguished science journalism and editing that has had a major impact on public understanding [...]

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Observations

Scientific American editor in chief Mariette DiChristina honored as one of “Three Wise Women” of 2009

The National Organization of Italian American Women (NOIAW) has selected Scientific American editor in chief Mariette DiChristina as one of its "Three Wise Women" of 2009. The organization, which since 1980 has been lauding extraordinary Americans of Italian heritage as a means to create positive role models, cited DiChristina for her achievement in science journalism [...]

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Plugged In

An Ailing Planet’s Path to Rio+20

photo for blog

Our planet’s health is ailing. That’s the message in short from the 2012 Living Planet Report. Its content is sobering. We are devouring 50 percent more resources than the Earth produces annually. Species populations have plummeted by 30 percent in the last 40 years. Freshwater scarcity abounds, and CO2 levels are soaring. Yet, the report’s co-authors [...]

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PsiVid

A Great Year for SciAm Google Hangouts!

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As the year winds down, I’m pleased to share the google hangouts on air I’ve done with SciAm, some in collaboration with my venture with co-host, Jeff Shaumeyer, Read Science! This summer, Scientific American polled its readers about their favorite summer science reads. By your choice, the winners were: Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined–The Truth about Talent, [...]

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PsiVid

Scientific American Blogs Officially Pop Culture Icon!

Time travel is tricky business. Scientists seem to always be wringing their hands over the potential implications of time travel. That is, if you believe the movies, and The Onion News Network’s analysis of Mitt Romney’s scheme to eliminate any versions of himself that sound too liberal, preventing the conservative vote! SciAm Blogs makes our [...]

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SA Visual

Evolution of the Scientific American Logo

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Scientific American’s logotype has undergone subtle shifts, large leaps and occasional bouts of nostalgia. The image series below outlines the history of the publication’s identity, starting with its debut in August 1845 as weekly devoted primarily to inventions. For more on the history of the magazine, check out this graphic to see how cover topics [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

How Do You Spot a Genius?

Drawing of Bobby Fischer and chess board

The November/December Scientific American Mind, which debuted online today, examines the origins of genius, a concept that inspires both awe and confusion. Some equate genius with IQ or creativity; others see it as extraordinary accomplishment. As this issue reveals, genius seems to arise from a mosaic of forces that coalesce into a perfect storm of [...]

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