ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "information graphic"

@ScientificAmerican

The Best American Infographics

Best American Infographics Cover

“The same forces that have made it possible for infographics to proliferate have also made us hungry for them. We are deluged with information, and infographics promise to make sense of it… the best of them bring clarity, answering urgent questions and making us think.” —Gareth Cook (from The Best American Infographics 2013) I’m happy [...]

Keep reading »
@ScientificAmerican

Scientific American Graphics Win 3 Bronze Medals at Malofiej

Malofiej21 logo

Last week, the world information graphics community convened in Pamplona, Spain, for the 21st annual Malofiej International Infographics Summit and Awards, organized by the Spanish chapter of the Society for News Design. Scientific American won 3 bronze medals in the print category, for “Exoplanets Everywhere” (print version below, web-formatted version here), “Space Age Wasteland” (print [...]

Keep reading »
@ScientificAmerican

A Defense of Artistic License in Illustrations of Scientific Concepts

Detail of two illustration approaches

The other day, my own hypocrisy slapped me in the face. I was looking at a quantum illustration. One for which I had just encouraged an artist to develop a dimensional and detailed representation of a particle, that—by the author’s own admission—may or may not exist. And if it does exist, we certainly know nothing [...]

Keep reading »
@ScientificAmerican

The Evolution of a Scientific American Information Graphic: Gamma-Ray Flashes

Dwyer_detail

On occasion, concept sketch submissions make me swoon. Most often, the happy-making sketch comes from a freelance illustrator that has been commissioned to flesh out a specific information graphic for us. But every once in awhile, an unexpected gem arrives directly from an author. Scientific American’s expert authors are generally great at providing reference material [...]

Keep reading »
@ScientificAmerican

Producing Scientific American Infographics in the Era of “Big Data”

1_NigelHolmes

“Big Data”—large and often complicated data sets that thwart quick analysis—remained a key phrase at the World Infographics Summit last month. But the buzz that surrounded that phrase seemed measured and in control. Experts of data visualization have emerged, and they come bearing elegant examples of what works, clumsy examples of what doesn’t, lessons learned, [...]

Keep reading »
@ScientificAmerican

The Evolution of a Scientific American Information Graphic: Stellar Life Cycle

The evolution of a Scientific American information graphic: stellar life cycle

As the art director of information graphics at Scientific American, I’m charged with developing explanatory art for some pretty mind-blowing topics. Our team—text editor, expert author, artist, and me—often works toward illustrating a process or concept that has never been rendered before, or may have only been visualized for other specialists in the field in [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

A Monkey’s Blueprint

MK_icon

Editor’s Note: The following is a guest post from Martin Krzywinski, a contributing artist who designed the Graphic Science illustration in the September issue of Scientific American magazine. For a graphic in the September 2014 issue of Scientific American, the editors challenged me to visually support the statement that we’re more like chimps and bonobos [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

On Climate Surveys, the People Agree—Mostly [Interactive]

climate_detail

It’s interesting to see how different points can pique the interest of different people looking at the same data set. My colleague Mark Fischetti (senior editor and partner-in-crime for many of the Graphic Science items in the magazine) was intrigued by bipartisan agreement on questions related to global warming in the survey results shown in [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

How Do You Visualize the Brain? [Contest]

brain_detail

Here at Scientific American, we develop lots of infographics about the brain. From classic neural pathway diagrams, depictions of medical breakthroughs, and maps of the brain’s genetic activity, there are as many solutions for visualizing the brain as there are questions about how it works. Now it’s your turn. MIT’s EyeWire, FEI and Visually are [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

4 Ways to Venus: An Artist’s Assignment

Geis_detail

Irving Geis (1908–1997) is probably best known for illustrations of biological macromolecules, such as his groundbreaking watercolor painting of myoglobin—an exhaustive and beautiful portrait of the first properly sorted protein molecule. (The work appears in “The Three-dimensional Structure of a Protein Molecule,” by John Kendrew, Scientific American, December 1961.) From 1948 through 1983 he lent [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

How I Reconciled My Love for Art and Science

crustacea_detail

In college in the 1990s, I suffered an identity crisis. Was I a scientist or an artist? I loved the clarity and order inherent to the scientific process; ask questions, set up methodologies, collect data, analyze. Research projects and papers I co-authored on the topics of trace fossils and hydrothermal vent species were immensely satisfying. [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

The Evolution of a Scientific American Information Graphic: Where the Wild Bees Are

detail of December 2013 Graphic Science image

Have you ever wondered how—and why—infographers push beyond familiar forms such as bar charts and network diagrams when translating information from a spreadsheet into an illustration? Data visualizer Moritz Stefaner explains the process behind his Graphic Science assignment for Scientific American in a post on his blog. Check out the final graphic in the December [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

The Best American Infographics

“The same forces that have made it possible for infographics to proliferate have also made us hungry for them. We are deluged with information, and infographics promise to make sense of it… the best of them bring clarity, answering urgent questions and making us think.” —Gareth Cook (from The Best American Infographics 2013) I’m happy [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

Scientific American Graphics Win 3 Bronze Medals at Malofiej

Last week, the world information graphics community convened in Pamplona, Spain, for the 21st annual Malofiej International Infographics Summit and Awards, organized by the Spanish chapter of the Society for News Design. Scientific American won 3 bronze medals in the print category, for “Exoplanets Everywhere” (print version below, web-formatted version here), “Space Age Wasteland” (print [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

A Defense of Artistic License in Illustrations of Scientific Concepts

The other day, my own hypocrisy slapped me in the face. I was looking at a quantum illustration. One for which I had just encouraged an artist to develop a dimensional and detailed representation of a particle, that—by the author’s own admission—may or may not exist. And if it does exist, we certainly know nothing [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

The Evolution of a Scientific American Information Graphic: Gamma-Ray Flashes

On occasion, concept sketch submissions make me swoon. Most often, the happy-making sketch comes from a freelance illustrator that has been commissioned to flesh out a specific information graphic for us. But every once in awhile, an unexpected gem arrives directly from an author. Scientific American’s expert authors are generally great at providing reference material [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Special Universe

Get the latest Special Collector's edition

Secrets of the Universe: Past, Present, Future

Order Now >

X

Email this Article

X