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Posts Tagged "Google"

@ScientificAmerican

Astrophysics, Citizen Science and the Google Science Fair

Chris Lintott, astrophysicist of Oxford University and founder of The Zooniverse. Credit: YouTube

Find out why Oxford University astrophysicist and founder of The Zooniverse Chris Lintott believes that humanity’s ability to be “deliciously distractable” is a creative engine powering the benefits of citizen science for discovery–and how, if you are a researcher, you might like to “play with your phyiscs.” With Google Student Ambassador Hanne Paine, we had [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Google Science Fair Hangout On-Air: Meet the Deep-Sea-Diving Exosuit

Vincent Pieribone, John Sparks, Exosuit and Mariette DiChristina. Credit: YouTube

Scientists studying marine life now have a new tool in a next-generation atmospheric diving system called the Exosuit. The suit–which looks like something an astronaut would wear and is on display at the American Museum of Natural History until March 5–lets a diver descend to 1,000 feet at surface pressure for several hours. As part [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Scientific American Science in Action in Swaziland

Sakhiwe Shongwe (left center, in green sweater), Bonkhe Mahlalela (right center, in green sweater) and local farmers in Swaziland.

We judges and others who work on the Google Science Fair believe that kids have the power to change the world. The $50,000 Scientific American Science in Action Award recognizes a particular type of change—one that focuses on making a practical difference by addressing an environmental, health or resources challenge. (For more on the award [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Seeing the Future through Tech-Colored (Google) Glass

Google Glass on Mariette DiChristina, editor in chief, Scientific American

Larry Page has said that, when he wears Google Glass, the wearable electronics that rests on the bridge of your nose like a pair of spectacles, he feels like he’s seeing the future. After I picked up Glass myself recently, I now know what he means. As a speaker and attendee of the recent Google [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Google Science Fair 2013 Finalist Gala

Google Science Fair 2013: Viney Kumar, Ann Makosinski, Elif Bilgin and Eric Chen. Credit: Google

Since I couldn’t bring you all with me to the amazing Google Science Fair Finalist Gala on 23 September, I’m posting the video here. The age-category winners are Viney Kumar, 14, for his work on a signalling system for emergency vehicles in the 13-14-year-old category; Ann Makosinski, 16, for her work in creating a batter-free [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Awe and Wonder at Google Zeitgeist

Scientific American Science in Action winner Elif Bilgin, 16, of Istanbul, Turkey, tells the audience about how she turned banana peels into bioplastics for her Google Science Fair entry. Credit: Google

One of the great privileges of my job—and, indeed, of any job that is somehow related to science and technology—is that it comes with regular infusions of wonder at what humanity has been able to do through the use of that process we call “science”: It is fundamental to how we learn about the way [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Google Science Fair 2013: A Hangout in a Swamp

Paleo Quest founders Jason Osborne (left), holding fossil whale vertebra, and Aaron Alford, fresh from a swamp dive. Credit: Google Science Fair

We had a fun first today for the 2013 Google Science Fair Hangouts On Air series of live chats with researchers around the world: with the aid of a smart phone propped up by two fossil bones, we streamed live from a Virginia swamp for a session called Paleo Quest: Venturing into the Unknown. I [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Videos for Executive Summit: Learning in the Digital Age

Mariette DiChristina, editor in chief and senior vice president of Scientific American, awarding the distinguished actor Alan Alda with the Scientific American Award for achievements in the public communication of science. Credit: Scientific American

What’s driving the digital revolution in education? And will it be a boon for students, helping the U.S. stay competitive in a global economy, as advocates say? Or, as critics say, will it improve only little on what teachers can do already—and threaten student privacy to boot? In the “Executive Summit: Learning in the Digital [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Science in Action Winner for 2013: Elif Bilgin

Elif Bilgin, winner of the 2013 Science in Action award, a $50,000 prize sponsored by Scientific American as part of the Google Science Fair.

“Genius,” Thomas Edison famously said, “is 1 percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.” He would have found a kindred spirit in Elif Bilgin, 16, of Istanbul, Turkey, winner of the 2013 $50,000 Science in Action award, part of the third annual Google Science Fair. The award honors a project that can make a practical difference [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

The 2013 Science in Action Finalists

The winning project in 2012 was the Unique Simplified Hydroponic Method, developed by two 14-year-old boys, Bonkhe Mahlalela (left) and Sakhiwe Shonwe of Swaziland, in southern Africa.

Now in its second year, the $50,000 Science in Action award, sponsored by Scientific American as part of the Google Science Fair, an annual global competition for teens ages 13 to 18, honors a project that can make a practical difference by addressing an environmental, health or resources challenge. Submissions should be innovative, easy to [...]

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Budding Scientist

Teens Engineer a Way to Help Swazi Farmers

SA Science in Action winners

Two teenagers from the southern African country of Swaziland have won Scientific American’s inaugural Science in Action award, part of the Google Science Fair. The prize is awarded to a project that addresses a social, environmental or health issue to make a practical difference in the lives of a group or community. This year’s winners [...]

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Compound Eye

Google’s Reverse Image Search

Earlier this summer Google quietly embedded a powerful new tool in their image works: the reverse search. The concept is simple. Drag an image into the search bar (as above), and Google will return locations where the same image appears on the web. If you’ve not used the reverse search, try it out! This technology, [...]

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Cross-Check

Don’t Believe Scare Stories about Cyber War

graphic of soldier imposed on computer chip

For years, a friend I’ll call Chip, knowing my obsession with war, has been telling me: "Cyber War! That’s what you should be writing about! Real war is passé!" Chip keeps sending me stories about all the damage digital attacks do—or rather, might do, because as far as I can tell cyber war hasn’t claimed [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Can Google’s page-rank algorithm help save endangered species and ecosystems?

Google HP on Earth Day 2008

When users seek information from Google, the search engine relies on a proprietary algorithm called PageRank™ to determine the order of the sites that show up in search results. Now, two researchers say a similar algorithm can be used to determine which species are critical to the preservation of ecosystems, allowing scientists to focus conservation [...]

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Observations

Why Big Data Isn’t Necessarily Better Data

Google,flu,big data

Tech companies—Facebook, Google and IBM, to name a few—are quick to tout the world-changing powers of “big data” gleaned from mobile devices, Web searches, citizen science projects and sensor networks. Never before has so much data been available covering so many areas of interest, whether it’s online shopping trends or cancer research. Still, some scientists [...]

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Observations

Search the Web, Plant a Tree—Every Minute

search panel

Google, Yahoo and other search engines make gobs of money from advertisers who pay to have ads pop up when you look for a term. A few more socially minded search engines like Goodsearch and Everyclick donate a few cents to charity when you seek or shop. But one site begun in 2009, Ecosia, donates [...]

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Observations

G+ Hangout at Noon: Zombie Tits, Ungifted and Animal Wise Authors Win Scientific American’s Summer Reading Poll

Join our G+ Hangout On Air at noon today (Friday, July 26) with the three winning authors, here: G+ Hangout on Air with Virginia Morell, Rebecca Crew and Scott Barry Kaufman, hosted by SA blogger Joanne Manaster The votes are in for Scientific American’s poll in which we asked readers to choose their favorite authors [...]

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Observations

Zombies Invade Google Campus

She looked perfectly normal. But what was she doing roaming around at night on the Google campus in Mountain View, Calif? She’d been drawn out of her home, following the light, and now was taking mincing steps across a white bed sheet. Had she just taken “the flight of the living dead”? Was she actually [...]

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Observations

Little-Used Voice Assistants Are the Future of Smart Phones

With the imminent arrival of Google‘s latest Android operating system later this month, Apple’s iOS upgrades this fall and Microsoft’s relentless push to make Windows relevant to mobile devices, a lot of people are talking about smartphones and tablets. The next few months will also likely see an increasing number of people talking to these [...]

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Observations

Planetary Resources’ Crazy Plan to Mine an Asteroid May Not Be So Crazy

Vesta, asteroid, Dawn, space

In a widely anticipated announcement today, the new company Planetary Resources revealed their plans for near-Earth asteroid domination. The group has mapped out a multi-stage process to map, observe, capture, tow and eventually mine asteroids for valuables. “A single 500-meter platinum-rich asteroid contains the equivalent of all the platinum group metals mined in history,” reads [...]

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Observations

Do You Know What Happens to Your Cellphone When You’re Done with It?

DURBAN, South Africa—I rented a cellphone during my sojourn here to cover the recent climate change negotiations. A local number enabled me to keep in touch with home and office but also, perhaps more importantly, to make appointments on the fly with ever harried international negotiators. The Nokia 2330—which was dubbed, affectionately, my “hellphone” by [...]

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Observations

What Happens to Google’s Other Social Networking Efforts?

Google, Web, Internet, social networking

The launch of the Google+ social network casts a shadow over Google’s previous efforts in this arena, including Orkut, Wave and Buzz, all of which still have active Web sites. For the most part Google+’s predecessors will coexist alongside the new social network as Google determines what works and what doesn’t. Google launched Orkut in [...]

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Observations

Cyber War-of-Words Escalation: China Goes on the Offensive against Google

cyber security,China,Google

China’s state-run Xinhua News Agency has struck back against Google following the Internet giant’s claims earlier this week that recent hacker attempts to steal G-mail user passwords appeared to have originated from China. Xinhua called Google’s statements "evil-intentioned" in an article published Friday and quoted Dai Yiqi, a cyber security researcher with Tsinghua University, as [...]

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Observations

The Future of the Internet: Video Via Lots of Mobile Gadgets

Internet,mobile,video,YouTube,Google

Internet video will comprise more than half of all Internet traffic, wireless devices will become the predominant way to surf the Web, and there will be more networked devices than people on this planet within the next few years. So says a Cisco Systems annual Visual Networking Index (VNI) report issued Wednesday to highlight the [...]

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Plugged In

Toronto Rolls with the Grid

My colleague Melissa Lott presciently today in this very space recalled the enormous India blackouts of 2012 and discussed new algorithms for addressing similar events in the future. Cue thunder, offstage: Toronto got almost 5 inches of rain on the night of July 8, washing out its downtown to an unprecedented scale. And naturally, after [...]

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Symbiartic

Talking Atheism, Science and Art at FtBCon

ScienceChessmini-GlendonMel

Today at 2pm Central, I’m excited to be taking part in FtBConscience: Atheism with a conscience, a free online conference hosted by the Freethought Blog Network. Naturally, I’ll be talking about art, science and atheism. Here’s the official blurb: Atheism, science and art 2pm – 3 pm Central Artists within the secular, scientific and skeptical [...]

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Symbiartic

SciArt on Google+

SciArtGplusmini

A couple of years ago, when the massive and amazing all-in-one scienceblogging.org was launching, the organizers asked if I thought there were enough artists blogging about science-related artwork to make an RSS feed that would update a few times a day or week, that could collect science-based artists under one roof. I said sure, and [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

Watch Me Speak: Google+ Hangout “On Air” (Jan 11, 7pm Pacific)

google_plus

I’m going to be participating in a Google+ Hangout “On Air” tomorrow night. Google+ Hangouts are multi-user video-chats, but they’re limited to 10 users. Hangouts “On Air” are, apparently, open to everyone to watch (though limited in the number of people who can actively participate, or something like that). Anyway, AV Flox (twitter, G+), who [...]

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