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Posts Tagged "Yeast"

The Artful Amoeba

Dandruff-Causing Skin Fungi Discovered Unexpectedly in Deep Sea Vents, Antarctica

malassezia_CDCphil_pd_200

Until relatively recently, the fungus Malassezia was thought to have one favorite home: us. As the dominant fungus on human skin and sometimes-cause of dandruff, the yeast Malassezia was thought to live a simple if sometimes irritating domestic existence humbly mooching off the oils we exude. No more. Thanks to the efforts of scientists over [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Solving a Winemaker’s Dilemma With Wild Yeast

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Have you noticed that wine seems to be packing more punch? Well, it’s not your imagination. Over the past 20 years, wine really has been getting stronger for some reasons that may surprise you. And it’s not a phenomenon that vintners are happy about. They would like to get those alcohol levels down. As a [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Yeast: Making Food Great for 5,000 Years. But What Exactly Is it?

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Fire was the first force of nature tamed for cooking. Yeast was second. In the early days of ancient Egypt, around 3100 B.C., there lived a ruler named Scorpion, who probably did not look like The Rock. When Scorpion died, pyramids had not yet been invented, so he was buried in a broad, low tomb [...]

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Food Matters

Friday Happy Hour: An Introduction (American Lager)

The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (click for source)

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , over 50% of adults over the age of 18 had at least one alcoholic drink per month in 2010. Of course, many of those folks (myself included) drank much more than that, totaling $152 billion dollars in the US alone according to US Department [...]

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Lab Rat

Communication between kingdoms: the micro-organisms that live on the human body

Image from reference 2

From the point of view of a micro-organism, the human body is a prime piece of real estate. For those bacteria and fungi that can avoid or fight off the immune systems, a human provides a whole range of moist, nutrient-filled little spaces in which to live. Some of these micro-organisms are harmless, growing and [...]

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Lab Rat

Synthetic DNA – now in yeast!

budding yeast cell

iGEM season is here and so to get into the spirit of things I thought I’d see if any interesting synthetic biology news had happened recently. It turns out that while I’ve been getting all excited about bacteria, people doing research on yeast have managed something pretty spectacular – they’ve replaced a whole section of [...]

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MIND Guest Blog

The Search for a Nobel Prize-Winning Synapse Machine

In the cellular machinery that Rothman, Schekman and Südhof all helped reconstruct, a SNARE complex - made of synaptobrevin, syntaxin and SNAP-25 - zips together to bind a synaptic vesicle to the surface of a receiving neuron. Courtesy of Danko Dimchev Georgiev, M.D. via Wikimedia Commons.

2013’s Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine honors three researchers in particular – but what it really honors is thirty-plus years of work not only from them, but also from their labs, their graduate students and their collaborators. Winners James Rothman, Randy Schekman and Thomas Südhof all helped assemble our current picture of the cellular [...]

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Oscillator

Starters: Fermenting With Finger Yeast

Nico and Charlie's first sourdough, by Wayne Marshall

My friend Wayne and his daughters Nico and Charlie recently made sourdough bread with homemade starters containing wild yeasts and bacteria. They started with just flour and water, capturing microbes from the air that start chewing up the flour, making the bubbles and flavors that give the bread its texture and its kick. I love [...]

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Symbiartic

Bone Dusters Paleo Ale, Brewed from Real Fossils!

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With craft brewing on the rise and many breweries tinkering with flavorings that range from the somewhat obvious (honey or citrus) to the eyebrow-raising (jalapeño, hemp, or even peanut butter cup) it was only a matter of time before someone stared a 35-million year old fossil in the face and thought, “would you make a [...]

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