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Posts Tagged "video"

Anthropology in Practice

Is The Grass Always Greener?

I’ve watched this video several times since @PetiteSam first shared it, and each time I’m struck by the simple message that we’re never quite satisfied. Is the idiom “the grass is always greener” true across cultures? It seems to be the case between nuts and bolts.

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The Artful Amoeba

A Closer Look at a Tiny, Floating Horde

sea_urchin_larvae_kirby_ocean_drifters

It’s a strange but true fact that the young of many familiar sea creatures look nothing like them. Drifting on currents to distribute their kind, they are an unsung part of the plankton, itself an unsung part of the sea. A few years back, I wrote about the work of Richard Kirby, a research fellow [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

There’s Darwin’s Fungus!

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Last winter I wrote a post called “Darwin’s Neon Golf Balls” about a fungus called Cyttaria that Darwin collected during his journey on the Beagle. The fungus has a fascinating alien shape and neon orange color when fresh. At the time, I wrote: According to the Royal Botanic Garden at Kew, Darwin sent his specimen [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

The Private Life of Plankton — in HD

ceratium_plankton_chronicles

Artistic black-and-white photos of plankton — as we saw last time — are fabulous. But what if one hungers for HD? The Plankton Chronicles have got you covered. On Friday I wrote about the Plankton Portal, a project to enlist the public’s help in identifying and cataloguing weird, deep-sea life. Via their blog, I learned [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

A Bleeding, Breathing Billboard Starring Serratia

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Just days after Sci Am published my story on the “bleeding” bacterium Serratia marcescens, a friend sent me this video, in which the marketing department behind the film “Contagion” up north apparently decided to go super-geek and cook up something delightful. Science as art, my friends. Way, way cool, boys. In addition to Serratia, which [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Know Another Language? Help Us Globalize Science by Translating Our Video Captions

Ever wonder what the wave function is? Or what the differences are between genes, chromosomes and DNA? Or why chimps are stronger than humans? We’ve tackled these and many other questions with our Instant Egghead video explainer series. Such questions are universal, and we know many people who don’t speak English would love the chance [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Instant Egghead Cracks Up [Video]

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If you haven’t seen it before, “Instant Egghead” is Scientific American’s ongoing series of short and (hopefully) entertaining explainer videos. Each episode features a Scientific American editor or contributor expounding on topics ranging from particle physics to the environment to weird bodily phenomena. As Instant Egghead‘s producer, I had an important decision to make when [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Watch: How Do Knees Work? An Iron Egghead Sample Video

Can you explain science with seven everyday items? We’re looking for some creative minds to explain how a part of the human body works, or how a process occurs in it, in two minutes or less. No fancy equipment is needed, either—a smartphone camera will do. For inspiration, take a gander at this sample video, [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Want a Free Scientific American Subscription? Enter Our Iron Egghead Video Contest

Can you explain science with seven everyday items? We’re looking for some creative minds to say how a part of the human body works, or how a process occurs in the body, in two minutes or less. No fancy equipment is needed—a smartphone camera will do. Winners will be featured on the Scientific American web [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Introducing Our New Video Series: The Countdown

YouTube has fast become a place where people get their news, and in that vein, we’re delighted to join the YouTube Space Lab channel with our new online series, The Countdown. Every other Thursday, host and self-proclaimed web nerd Dave Mosher presents the five coolest things happening in space, astronomy and physics. Our first episode [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Can You Explain Science with 7 Everyday Items? Enter Our ‘Iron Egghead’ Video Contest

Iron Egghead:shoelace,paper clips, rubber band, pen,paper, cup, ball

Remember MacGyver from the old TV series? He could build a laser from a pair of eyeglasses, a match, and some dental floss and then mount it on a shark, or so it seemed. We’re not asking you to do that, exactly. Rather, we thought it’d be fun if science enthusiasts like you could explain [...]

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Compound Eye

How Photography Transformed Spider Science

For being mildly arachnophobic I’ve been on a real spider binge lately. Here’s a wonderful Smithsonian-produced video highlighting the role of photography in spider science: (h/t Bug Girl)

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Compound Eye

Thrifty Thursday: Army Ants Filmed on a Budget

Thrifty Thursdays feature photographs movies taken with equipment costing less than $500. [Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS3 - $241; Glidetrack shooter - $276] I often fill the Thrifty Thursday slot with still photographs from my trusty Panasonic digicam. As much as I like the camera for snapshots, though, I actually bought it for video. This clip was [...]

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Extinction Countdown

First-Ever Video of Critically Endangered Myanmar Snub-Nosed Monkeys

myanmar snub-nosed monkey

Here’s something you don’t see every day: video footage of the critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus strykeri), a species that was only discovered in 2010. You can count at least 23 of the rare monkeys, out of a total population estimated to range from 260 to 330 individuals for the entire species, in the [...]

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Food Matters

Our Microbial Organ – The Good and Bad Bugs of the Human Gut

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Ever since coming to Harvard, I’ve been involved with a graduate student group called “Science in the News.” At SITN, the goal is to bring the fascination with scientists that graduate students have to a wider audience, and the flagship effort of the group is a series of lectures held every Autumn and Spring that [...]

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Not bad science

Forget The Flea Circus, Bees Can Do All The Tricks

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When we think of animals doing tricks, we’re likely to think of dogs               or maybe even a parrot               But you probably didn’t think of bumblebees. However, check out these videos of these bumblebees performing some seemingly impressive feats:   How did [...]

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Observations

3 Ingredients Make Good July 4th Fireworks [Video]

How different types of chemicals combine for a holiday blast.

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Observations

Lonely Star Cluster Kicked Out of Its Galaxy [Video]

illustration of hypervelocity globular cluster 1 (HVGC-1)

Like most star clusters, hypervelocity globular cluster 1 (HVGC-1) once belonged to a galaxy, but this unlucky object is now destined to wander the cosmos alone. Somehow, the cluster was ejected from its home galaxy, M87, and is now speeding away at more than two million miles per hour. Learn more in the video below: [...]

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Observations

How a Young Boy, a Cow and a Milkmaid Helped to Conquer Smallpox [Video]

Screen Shot 2013-10-29 at 2.45.51 PM

If you aren’t familiar with the TEDEd series of animated videos, you should be. The series pairs professional educators with top-notch animators to create short video “lessons” on a huge variety of topics in science, medicine and history.
 The latest episode features several of the early attempts to fight smallpox, a disease caused by a [...]

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Observations

Gravity-Defying, Self-Siphoning Metal Beads Explained [Video]

The effect is as astonishing as it is hypnotic: a chain of metal beads magically arcs above its container as the beads fall to the ground. The beads in the video, made by Steve Mould, who hosts several BBC science shows, are not magnetic, either. Pretty cool, huh? Mould gives us an explanation the video [...]

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Observations

Robot Bees Learn to Fly [Video]

RoboBees

In March, the Harvard University researchers behind the RoboBee project wrote an article in Scientific American that detailed the challenges of building a swarm of bee-sized robots. The effort breaks into three loose categories: first, you have to figure out how to build a insect-sized robot that can fly (and build a lot of them—no [...]

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Observations

Crowd Watching: Video Analytics Could Flag Crimes Before They Happen

Boston marathon, bomb, investigation

Soon after the investigation into Monday’s Boston Marathon bombings began, law enforcement urged the public to e-mail any video, images or other information that might lead them to the guilty party. “No piece of information or detail is too small,” states the F.B.I.’s Web site. Picking through all of this footage in search of clues [...]

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Observations

Why Jim Hansen Stopped Being a Government Scientist [Video]

Why did James Hansen retire on April 2 after 32 years as director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies? As he told the enterprising students of Columbia University’s Sustainability Media Lab who captured him in the following video, “I want to devote full time to trying to help the public understand the urgency of [...]

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Observations

Beautiful Video Imagines the Thousands of Known Exoplanets Orbiting a Single Star

LONG BEACH, Calif.—Yesterday I wrote about the excitement at the American Astronomical Meeting here about new exoplanet discoveries. Scientists working on the Kepler satellite announced the discovery of an additional 461 planet candidates, bringing the total to 2,740. What are these planets like? Alex Parker, a postdoctoral researcher in planetary science at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center [...]

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Observations

Qualcomm Kicks Off CES with Superfast Snapdragon Mobile Processors (Endorsed by NASCAR, Big Bird and Captain Kirk)

CES

LAS VEGAS—In a sign of how wireless technologies have moved to the fore in consumer electronics, Qualcomm CEO Paul Jacobs kicked off the 2013 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) here Monday night with a keynote spotlighting the impact of superfast processors on mobile apps, gaming and even ultra high-definition television (Ultra HDTV). Smart phones, tablets and [...]

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Observations

Please Play with Your Math: New Museum Opens in New York City

Math can be a beautiful, immersive, full-body experience, according to the creators of the newly opened Museum of Math, or MoMath, in New York City. A sculpture that lights up and plays music, a touch-screen floor that turns into a maze and a square-wheeled tricycle that one can ride around a bumpy track are just [...]

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Octopus Chronicles

Soft Octopus Escape—and Paperback Octopus! Release [Video]

octopus book paperback

Octopuses long ago shed their ancestors’ protective shells in favor of a slinkier, floppier, softer existence. They were perhaps never meant to be held down by hard covers. In fact, many scientists credit this unlikely evolution for their wily intelligence. That is why I am extra excited for the publication of Octopus! The Most Mysterious [...]

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Octopus Chronicles

First Common Octopus Cannibalism Filmed in the Wild [Video]

octopus cannibalism

Perhaps it’s time we stopped feeling quite so bad about eating octopus. Octopuses dine on other octopuses, too. And for the first time, that behavior has been caught on video in the common octopus in the wild—three times. Cannibalistic behavior in the lab setting is well known. This is one of the reasons octopuses can be so [...]

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Octopus Chronicles

8 Great Octopus Videos! [Video]

It’s Octopus Chronicles‘ 88th post! To celebrate, I’ve gone on an all-arms hunt through the deep crevasses of the internet to find eight of my favorite octopus videos. Some are old classics (such as Roger Hanlon‘s amazing, reverse-vanishing octopus) and others are new and stunning—and one even features an octopus walking (slithering?) on land. Really, [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Watch the Incredible Shrinking Woman [Video]

“Big” me. “Little” me. Watch these two versions of me–which are really the same size–explain why I appear petite in one place on screen and large in another. The reason, in short, is that I have been trapped in a clever visual illusion, one invented 78 years ago by American opthalmologist Adelbert Ames Jr. In [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Star Filmmakers Found in Unlikely Spot

Two kids in lab coats and goggles apparently doing an experiment.

In Tyson Schoeber’s class at Nootka Elementary School in Vancouver, 15 fourth through seventh graders struggle to read, write or do math at a level near that of their peers in other classes. Ten-year-olds have entered Schoeber’s program, called THRIVE, virtually unable to read independently (see “One Man’s Mission to Save Struggling Students”). Yet Schoeber [...]

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Symbiartic

Talking Visual Communication on BreakingBio

BreakingBio-Glendon-Mellow

Summer went by swiftly, but my words of wisdom shall last throughout the ages. Come and be charmed by Bug Girl, Steven Hamblin and Morgan Jackson, while I deliver my sermon from atop the Canadian peaks of sciart greatness, and spread loaves of sage advice and tattooed goodness to gladden your heart. It is I, [...]

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