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"plants"56 articles archived since 1845

An Eye-Popping New Look at Flowers’ Highly Public Private Parts

People who lack the gardening bug often regard flowers like fashion models: pretty but boring. Jens Petersen, the man who gave us the groundbreaking photographs of fungi in “The Kingdom of Fungi”, which I reviewed here in March, has a new book of photographs (still available only in Danish, unfortunately, and called Blomsterliv — “Flower [...]

August 15, 2014 — Jennifer Frazer

From the archives: Chameleon bacteria!

This post was originally published in “Life of a Lab Rat” on Wednesday 3rd February 2010. Chameleon bacteria This is a picture of a small cyanobacteria under red light: And this is a picture of exactly the same organism under blue-green light: Some cyanobacteria have the ability to change their colour depending on external conditions.

June 24, 2014 — S.E. Gould

What about Earth’s Microbiome?

The latest temperature readings from Antarctica are giving the world pause, along with the finding that 70 percent of the western Antarctic ice shelf has melted.

April 22, 2015 — Raina Maier

Are Cycads Social Plants?

Botanists have long puzzled over a peculiarity of ancient plants called cycads: they have huge, bright, fleshy seeds displayed in enormous cones.

October 16, 2013 — Jennifer Frazer

Call of the Orangutan: A Camera Trap Menagerie

In order to get more information about the forest here at the Sikundur research station in North Sumatra, I've set up four camera traps, which I'm using to get a better look at the wildlife around the site.

November 25, 2014 — James Askew

Plant Engineers Sow Debate

Today virtually everything we eat is produced from seeds that have been genetically altered in some way. New methods of plant tinkering have emerged over the generations—and so, too, have the fears

May 1, 2014 — Pamela C. Ronald
The Lawson Trek: Finding Something New

The Lawson Trek: Finding Something New

Editor's note: For The Lawson Trek, journalist Scott Huler is retracing the journey of discovery undertaken by canoe and on foot in 1700-1701 by John Lawson, the first observer to carefully describe and catalogue the flora, fauna, geography and inhabitants of the Carolinas.

October 10, 2014 — Scott Huler

Botanical Sexism Cultivates Home-Grown Allergies

It's the time year for watery eyes and itchy noses, and if you're among the afflicted, you may be surprised to learn that decades of botanical sexism in urban landscapes have contributed to your woes.

April 29, 2015 — Thomas Leo Ogren

Introducing: The Food Matters Crew

Do you ever wonder about the science behind your food? We do, too. Our group of writers serves up juicy topics like genetic engineering, gut bacteria and the chemical reactions that occur during cooking.

September 3, 2013 — See Arr Oh
Lawsuit to Remove Plant from Endangered Species List Completely Backfires

Lawsuit to Remove Plant from Endangered Species List Completely Backfires

Oh what a difference a few years makes. Just four years ago, the rare California shrub known as the Indian Knob mountain balm (Eriodictyon altissimum) was poised to drop off the endangered species list after the threats to its existence had mostly been abated.

December 12, 2013 — John R. Platt

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