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Posts Tagged "Plankton"

The Artful Amoeba

A Closer Look at a Tiny, Floating Horde

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It’s a strange but true fact that the young of many familiar sea creatures look nothing like them. Drifting on currents to distribute their kind, they are an unsung part of the plankton, itself an unsung part of the sea. A few years back, I wrote about the work of Richard Kirby, a research fellow [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

The Private Life of Plankton — in HD

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Artistic black-and-white photos of plankton — as we saw last time — are fabulous. But what if one hungers for HD? The Plankton Chronicles have got you covered. On Friday I wrote about the Plankton Portal, a project to enlist the public’s help in identifying and cataloguing weird, deep-sea life. Via their blog, I learned [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Ever Wanted to Observe and ID Weird Deep Sea Creatures? Here’s Your Chance

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If you’re like me, you’ve pondered from time to time the goings-on of life in the deep. What’s happening down there this very moment? What do the creatures look like when they’re just hanging out? But most of us will never be able to take a trip in a submersible. Now, though fuzzy and in [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Diatoms, or The Trouble with Life in Glass Houses

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Blogger’s note: I’m still away from the blog taking care of important life stuff, but I’ll be back soon! This post originally appeared on March 28, 2010. It has been edited slightly. Earlier this week I posted a link to Victorian microscope slides that included arranged diatom art. People really seemed to respond to the [...]

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Culturing Science

How One Little Molecule Influences Earth’s Climate

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A seemingly humdrum little molecule has found itself responsible for not just one but two positive feedback loops, one moderating climate and the other gathering animals across the food web.

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Expeditions

You wanted to know: what is this virus that infects the phytoplankton? (Part One)

So far I’ve told you about the phytoplankton we’re studying — the coccolithophores, how we figure out where they’re going to be, and how we collect them. But there’s a key element that’s missing in this description: the virus that infects them. And a lot of you wanted to know about it. What kind of [...]

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Expeditions

Off the ice in search of marine snow

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Editor’s Note: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution oceanographer and photographer Chris Linder and science writer Helen Fields are taking part in a six-week cruise of the Bering Sea, a scientific expedition to study the effects of climate change on this polar ecosystem. This is the third blog post. To see all their posts, see "60 Seconds [...]

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Life, Unbounded

Diary Of An Exhausted Scientist

Captured June 5th, the cure for cosmic angst and fatigue (C. Scharf)

I swore I’d never do this, indeed, I’m on record in these very pages as having disparaged the kind of thing I’m about to do. Oh well. All I can say is that normal service will be resumed as soon as possible. Which will be a good thing, because a huge number of interesting and [...]

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