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Posts Tagged "Book Reviews"

The Artful Amoeba

Fungi Like You’ve Never Seen Them Before

Rhizopus_stolonifer_petersen_200

When I took Mycology 101 in grad school, the textbook situation was so bad that the one we used came on a CD-ROM. Not came with a CD-ROM. It was one. My professor grumbled that printed mycology texts all had their flaws and none was great. The illustrations were usually fair to poor. The drawings [...]

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Food Matters

Vitamania: Why We Swallow the Supplement Industry’s Magic Pills

Vitamania

Now and then a book comes along that educates and entertains at the same time. When an author manages this with the beaten-to-death topic of nutrition, it’s doubly impressive. Catherine Price’s forthcoming (Feb 24) “Vitamania: Our Obsessive Quest for Nutritional Perfection,” is the surprisingly fascinating story of vitamins—their discovery, their functions in our bodies, and [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

New Books on Dinosaurs 2: Dean Lomax and Nobumichi Tamura’s Dinosaurs of the British Isles

Front cover of Lomax & Tamura (2014). Life reconstruction of Eustreptospondylus, with skeletal reconstruction of Cetiosaurus, and bones of Iguanodon, Megalosaurus and Mantellisaurus.

Following on from February’s review of Matthew P. Martyniuk’s Beasts of Antiquity: Stem-Birds in the Solnhofen Limestone, it’s time once again to look at another recently published dinosaur-themed book. Anyone who knows anything about Mesozoic dinosaurs will know that the British Isles – England specifically – has a special role in the history of our [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

New Books on Dinosaurs 1: Matthew P. Martyniuk’s Beasts of Antiquity: Stem-Birds in the Solnhofen Limestone

Cover of Martyniuk (2013), though note that the book is square, not portrait-format as this image of the cover implies.

Recent months have seen the publication of several new dinosaur-themed books, and in this and several future articles I want to share brief thoughts on them. This article represents another effort to get through my backlog of books-needing-reviews. To work… Matthew P. Martyniuk’s Beasts of Antiquity: Stem-Birds in the Solnhofen Limestone is a new, fantastically [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Chet Van Duzer’s Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps

Front cover of Van Duzer's (2013) Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps.

One of the most spectacular and visually fascinating Tet Zoo-related books of recent-ish months is Chet Van Duzer’s Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps, published in 2013 by the British Library. I said a few words about this book back in June 2013, and here (at last) is the proper review I’ve been promising. Lavishly [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Loxton and Prothero’s Abominable Science! Origins of the Yeti, Nessie, and Other Famous Cryptids; the Tet Zoo review

Abominable Science!, already well more than a year old...

I’m an unashamed fan of cryptozoology – this being (for the two of you that don’t know) the field of study that revolves around those creatures thought to exist by some, but which remain unrecognised by mainstream science in general. These are the cryptids*: entities like Bigfoot, Yeti, the Loch Ness Monster, sea-serpents, and so [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Mark Witton’s Pterosaurs: beautiful, lavish, scholarly and comprehensive

Front cover of Witton (2013): an antlered nyctosaurid at sunset.

I assume you’re here for the Tetrapod Zoology. If so, you’ll have been excited and intrigued by one of 2013’s best tetrapod-themed books: Mark Witton’s Pterosaurs, an enormous, lavishly illustrated encyclopedia of all things pterosaur. Scholarly but highly readable, fully referenced throughout, and featuring hundreds of excellent photos, diagrams and beautiful, colour life restorations, this [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Hunter and Barrett’s A Field Guide to the Carnivores of the World

For all their popularity as the subject of dedicated books, cats, dogs, bears and their relatives have never previously been the focus of a single, field guide-style volume that treats all of them together. Luke Hunter and Priscilla Barrett’s A Field Guide to the Carnivores of the World (published 2011) is a beautifully illustrated, comprehensive [...]

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