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Posts Tagged "relationships"

Anthropology in Practice

What does it mean to be an introvert online?

Photo by AshtonPal, CC. Click on image for license and information.

Did you take public transportation today? And where did you sit? Did you take the seat on the end? What about your phone at work? Did it actually ring today? Did you let it go to voicemail? In fact, do you prefer responding to emails over talking on the phone? Or maybe you went out—and [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Creeping Connectivity: Work and Life in a Hyper-Connected World

It’s 10:30 PM on a Sunday night. I’ve finished folding our laundry and just started the dishwasher. As on most Sundays, S and I just finished watching The Walking Dead. Although while he was fully focused on the plight of the characters, I did what I normally do: half listened while I scanned work emails [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

What Differentiates a Twitter Mob from a Twitter Mob?

What defines a mob? | Image by jinterwas, CC.

Brevity may be the soul of wit, but what does wit matter if no one’s listening? On Twitter the potential exists for many people to listen even if they aren’t connected. The reach of Twitter creates the possibility of a shared experience that extends well beyond the immediate network of a user: When the Japanese [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

A match meant to be? Social media and sports

Photo by The Malones. Click on image for license and information.

In 2010 one of the questions sports organizations were wrestling with was whether they should allow their players to tweet. That question is far from defined, but it’s becoming clear that social media has an important role to play within the sport community. Recently, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick responded to critics on twitter [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

The Psychology of Sexting

Photo by Jonas Seaman | CC, Click on image for license and information.

For those of us old enough to remember the deluge of “A/S/L?” messages that predominated the chatroom landscape of the nineties, sexting hardly seems that scandalous. Considering the murky exchanges that often ensued once A/S/L had been satisfied and body measurements had been exchanged, it’s a wonder that we stopped touching ourselves long enough do [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Digital Hydra: The Rise of the Couple Profile on Facebook

Hercules slays the Lernaean Hydra. | CC, Wikimedia.

In Greek mythology, the Hydra was a dangerous water serpent with many heads. Its breath was allegedly poisonous, and for every head you cut off two more would grow in its place. I have a few couples in my Facebook network who have merged their profiles—they’ve become Hydras in their own way: a single entity, [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

What does it mean when we need to take a break from Facebook?

Recently a friend of mine posted that she was closing her Facebook account. She isn’t sure that she will return to the land of vacation photos and passive-aggressive banter. Her decision was fueled by a few factors: concerns about privacy, non-stop requests to play Candy Crush Saga, and status updates that she perceived as inane [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Why Are We Signing Our Emails With “Thank You”?

When was the last time you used some variation of the phrase “Thank you”? At the coffee shop this morning? While you were having dinner last night? Because someone held the elevator for you? How about online? Have you used it to sign an email recently? Did you intentionally not use that phrase? And did [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

On My Shelf: Blue Jeans–The Art of the Ordinary

bluejeans

Blue Jeans: The Art of the Ordinary | Daniel Miller and Sophie Woodward | University of California Press | 184 pages | $24.95 (Paperback) I’m willing to bet you own at least one pair of jeans. Denim clothing—which will be used interchangeably with jeans for this discussion—is popular with people just about everywhere, with the [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Decoding the Art of Flirtation

To mark Valentine’s Day, I’m posting an early piece that originally appeared on the old home of Anthropology in Practice. Hope your connections are everything you hope for today. A lingering look. A coy smile. Standing just a bit too close. An accidental brush. Flirtation is an art. It is also a deftly employed social [...]

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Bering in Mind

Are Straight Women and Gay Men “Natural Allies”? An Evolutionary Account

Not every gay man has a female best friend, nor does every straight woman have a gay man as her most trusted confidant. But according to a recent article in Evolutionary Psychology, every one should. The authors of this piece, the psychologist Eric Russell and his colleagues from Texas Christian University, claim that the age-old [...]

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Dog Spies

Did You Have A Good Pee, Mr. Rhino?

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Thanks to a recent study on the urine flow of differently sized mammals (yes, small mammals “drip” and large mammals “jet”— more here), I came across a gem of a YouTube video where three out-of-frame tourists on safari observe and narrate the public urination of a rhino. As the urination event unfolds, comments bounce from [...]

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MIND Guest Blog

The Warning Signs That Depression Is Affecting Your Relationship

Adapted from When Depression Hurts Your Relationship: How To Regain Intimacy and Reconnect with Your Partner When You’re Depressed. Copyright 2014 Shannon Kolakowski. If your relationship is struggling, depression may be the culprit. A resounding body of research has shown how closely depression is related to relationships in a cyclical fashion: depression affects the quality [...]

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Observations

Accurate Self-Beliefs Strengthen Relationships

self-knowledge

How well do we know ourselves? The intuition that you are your own best judge is strong, yet flawed. The prevailing wisdom in social psychology today is that we are incorrigible self-enhancers. We tend to think we are more attractive, intelligent and agreeable than we really are. Conversely, depressed people have been found to make [...]

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PsySociety

Fear and Love on a Shaky Bridge

shakybridge

“Imagine being in the jungle, thousands of miles from civilization…” Thus opened the promo two years ago for Love In The Wild, the “extreme dating experiment” on NBC that sent its contestants on first dates that were jam packed with shaky bridges, crocodile attacks, and bungee jumping. Either NBC replaced their writing staff with former academics, [...]

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PsySociety

Sex and the Married Neurotic

800px-Wedding_rings

There are few things in this world that I truly loathe. One of those things is the show Everybody Loves Raymond. Why, you might ask? First of all, it’s actually quite hard to really ‘love’ Raymond. From what I’ve seen of the show (which is admittedly not much), he seems to care about three things: golf, [...]

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PsySociety

Love, hate…what’s the difference?

I_Hate_You_I_Love_You_by_asphyxiat3d

In honor of Valentine’s Day, I’d like to take a quick look at one of the most fundamental human emotions — hate. Wait, that doesn’t seem right. Hate? On Valentine’s Day? Isn’t V-Day supposed to be about love, Hallmark, and all of those positive, mushy feelings? Well, sure. Of course Valentine’s Day is supposed to [...]

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PsySociety

The Psychology of Giving Thanks

romantic_couple_koala_plushie_by_ameliaange-d39f4r2

As we all sit down tonight to feast on turkey and pumpkin pie, many of us will be going around the table giving thanks for our everyday sources of gratitude, like friendships, relationships, and good health. Luckily, there are actually plenty of reasons why Thanksgiving itself can help maintain and improve those very things for [...]

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PsySociety

Atonement, Forgiveness, And Our Most Fundamental Error.

goodintentions

Today is the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur. Although it is often called the “holiest day of the Jewish year,” what is notable about Yom Kippur is not the fact that it is particularly holy, nor is it the fact that many Jews you know might be particularly hungry today. Yom Kippur is notable because [...]

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PsySociety

Happy Father’s Day! The Psychology of Papas.

DadsDay

When thinking about parents and children, most people — including psychological researchers — tend to focus on the characteristics and importance of the mother-child bond. However, in honor of Father’s Day, I think it’s about time to focus a little attention on the importance of Dads.

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PsySociety

Fox News Fact Check: Is it bad for lower-income kids if Mom has a job outside the home?

Fairbalanced

Last week, the anchors at Fox News made headlines when they covered the recent Pew Research Center finding that 40% of all households in America have a female primary breadwinner. About 1/3 of these households consist of two-parent households where the mothers make more money than their husbands, and the remaining 2/3 consist of single [...]

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PsySociety

The Incredible Importance of Mom

I don't think I ever wanted THIS much proximity, Mom.

Imagine that you’re an infant monkey, and you’ve just been thrown into a cage after several hours in isolation. You’ve been deprived of food, so you’re starving. Facing you are two adult-looking (fake) monkeys, designed to look like each one could potentially be your mother. On the left is a “wire mother,” equipped with a [...]

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PsySociety

How To Have A Longer Marriage Than Kim Kardashian.

KimKardashian

Two decades ago, a team of researchers led by psychologist John Gottman set out to determine one thing: Why do couples get divorced? Gottman decided to answer this question by trying something very simple: Recording married couples talking for 15 minutes about a recent conflict that they were having in their relationship, and then carefully [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Cultivate Your Character [Video]

The term “character” has numerous and widely varied meanings. It defines each of these letters and symbols I am typing. It can be used to refer to features of wines, and it captures fictional folks in movies in books. I often call funny or stand-out individuals “characters,” too. In psychology, however, “character” most often adheres [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Take Care of Your Brain—and Your Friendships

Courtesy of Alexms22 via Wikimedia Commons

Fighting back emotion, Tony Dorsett, the former Dallas Cowboys’ running back, told ESPN last fall: “It’s painful, man, for my daughters to say they’re scared of me…it’s painful.” Dorsett said he suffers from memory problems, depression and difficulty controlling his emotions. He said he has even thought about suicide. The likely cause of Dorsett’s distress [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Repent for Your Sins—or Turn Them into Something Good

Courtesy of jhoana.tamayo via Flickr.

The November/December Scientific American Mind is a tribute to the seven deadly sins. Not that gluttony, envy, greed, sloth, wrath, lust and pride are necessarily laudable traits, but we can learn a lot from them. Some of them can even work in our favor if we know how to harness them. Others, we must simply [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Benefits of Online Attraction: The Movie

Courtesy of Katsunojiri via Flickr.

Biologist Carin Bondar features my blog, “Meeting Your Spouse Online May Lead to a Better Marriage,” (and me!) in her video compilation of Scientific American blog network hits for the month of June. In her series, “The Headlines Have It!–Best of the Blogs,” Bondar also showcases blogger Felicity Muth chatting about her post, “Are Pigs [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Meeting Your Spouse Online May Lead to a Better Marriage

Courtesy of lyubenov.com via Wikimedia Commons.

I met my husband at a party in a bygone era. He had no online profile. Neither did I. We didn’t trade email addresses, as neither of us had one of those either. He seemed like a good guy–and a party was as good a venue as any for meeting a future spouse. He still [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Social and Emotional Learning Empowers Children

Editor’s note: The below is a response to a critique of MindUP, a social and emotional learning program pioneered by actor Goldie Hawn. I have covered this program in other blogs (see list below) and in a feature in Scientific American Mind (visit “Schools Add Workouts for Attention, Grit and Emotional Control”). I hope this [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Educating Character and Other Lessons from Scientific American MIND

Teacher and children breathing

I am happy to be breaking my silence of recent weeks with a preview of the September/October issue of Scientific American Mind. As the summer begins its slow resignation and people anticipate the start of school, our pages revive the ongoing societal debate about the best way to teach our kids. This issue of Mind [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Why Are There No Biological Tests in Psychiatry?

Part 5 of a 5-part series By Allen Frances* When the third edition of psychiatry’s manual of mental illness, the DSM-III, was published 30 years ago, there was great optimism it would soon be the willing victim of its own success, achieving a kind of planned obsolescence. Surely, the combining of a reasonably reliable system [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

The Importance of Being Social

soccer football team huddle

Guest Blog by Leonard Mlodinow* One advantage of belonging to a cohesive society in which people help each other is that the group is often better equipped than a set of individuals to deal with threats from the outside. People intuitively realize there is strength in numbers, and take comfort in the company of others, [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Want to Change Your Life? This Movie Might Inspire You

People V. The State of Illusion, a new docudrama from Samuel Goldwyn Films, is a mixture of fiction and brain science that, despite these awkward bedfellows, was compelling enough to keep me up late on a Friday night. Although most of the well-worn findings parroted by the movie’s parade of experts were not new to [...]

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