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Editor’s Selections: Cave paintings, Religiosity, and Morality

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.


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This week on ResearchBlogging.org:

  • Cris Campbell of Genealogy of Religion presents the possibility that Paleolithic cave paintings in the Rouffignac Cave may have been done by children, and are not the practiced markings left by shamans.
  • At Psychothalamus, we learn about the reproductive religiosity model, which proposes that sexual and family values and direct religious leanings: our mating strategies help us assess the costs of particular religious affiliations.
  • Is morality genetically encoded? At Science Sushi, Christie Wilcox explores recent research on the effects that variations in serotonin transmitter genes may have on our tendencies to act on behalf of the “greater good.”

I’ll be back next week with more from anthropology, philosophy, and research.

Krystal D'Costa About the Author: Krystal D'Costa is an anthropologist working in digital media in New York City. You can follow AiP on Facebook. Follow on Twitter @krystaldcosta.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





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