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Posts Tagged "Anecdotes from the Archive"

Anecdotes from the Archive

The Army in the air

Before there were B-52s and F-15s, there were balloons. The issue from November 13, 1909, reported on the status of aeronautics in the U.S. military, which at the time was under the control of the Signal Corps, a branch in charge of the transfer of information and intelligence. According to the article, the United States [...]

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Anecdotes from the Archive

Anecdotes from the Archive: A ship-shooting formula

One of the reasons I dreaded math class was the looming feeling that what I learned would turn out to be useless. No matter how hard I tried, I could not imagine a situation outside of school when I would need to know how to graph a logarithm or find the degree of an unknown [...]

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Anecdotes from the Archive

Anecdotes from the Archive: What’s black and white and brown all over?

Answer: The Zebrass. The zebrass is a mix between an African zebra and a Texas donkey. This hybrid first came to be, according to the May 7, 1910 article, when President Theodore Roosevelt was given a royal Abyssinian zebra from King Menelik of Ethiopia. The President "turned the striped creature over to the [government] experiment [...]

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Anecdotes from the Archive

Anecdotes from the Archive: Map-making on wheels

Have you ever found yourself stumbling upon some great new restaurant or hiking path and, having no idea how you got there, realize its impossible to get back a second time? If only you had a cyclograph–a device that attached to a bicycle and made a topographical account of where you rode. The cyclograph was [...]

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Anecdotes from the Archive

Anecdotes from the Archive: Happy 95th anniversary to…Electrical Prosperity Week!

According to this ad for Western Electric, Electrical Prosperity Week was held from November 29 to December 4, 1915:   It was a national event that was held to showcase how indispensible electricity is to everyday life, and to show off some of its capabilities. I haven’t come across any reviews of how it all [...]

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Anecdotes from the Archive

Anecdotes from the Archive: Finding beauty in all of this snow

There’s no doubt that large amounts of snowfall and record-low temperatures have made this a particularly brutal winter. Between road closings, power outages, flight cancellations, and all that shoveling, it’s difficult to stop and acknowledge the beauty brought by winter before it melts away just as quickly as it came. Luckily, the January 20th, 1912 [...]

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Anecdotes from the Archive

Anecdotes from the Archive: All clean on the Western Front

Throughout its history, Scientific American published numerous war-related articles ranging from strategies and weaponry to more candid, humanizing portraits of life at the front. In this article from April 14, 1917, we learn how some soldiers were able to stay fresh and clean during World War I via the routte de bains or traveling bath [...]

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Anecdotes from the Archive

Anecdotes from the Archive: The key to sorting mail

A certain children’s show I grew up watching had an episode featuring the post office. The host of the show got a behind-the-scenes look at what happened to all the mail once it had been delivered to the post office, and I was immediately fascinated by the immensity of letters and their ability to find [...]

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Anecdotes from the Archive

Anecdotes from the Archive: A ride fit for a shah

In a December 8, 1900, article about a new steam automobile, the "Serpollet Carriage," we learn that the inventor, M. Serpollet, had the honor of cruising around with some royalty. According to the article, the shah of Persia, Mozaffar ad-Din Shah Qajar, purchased one of Serpollet’s vehicles while on a visit to Paris. This image [...]

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Anecdotes from the Archive

Anecdotes from the Archive: Relief for writers

As anyone who has written by hand over the course of a lengthy sitting knows, comfort can quickly become an issue. The October 22, 1853 issue of Scientific American featured an invention recently patented by Joseph G. Goshon of Shirleysburg, PA and William H. Towers of Bucyrus, OH called the "Elastic Pad for Penmen." The [...]

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