ADVERTISEMENT
Anecdotes from the Archive
  • Facing Poison Gas, 1915

    Facing Poison Gas, 1915

    By Dan Schlenoff | July 31, 2015 |

    Reported in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: July 31, 1915  The world’s first full-scale attack by poison gas took place on April 22, 1915, near the town of Ypres in Belgium. It was a stunning success for the Germans who deployed it, and a catastrophe for the French territorial troops who were unfortunate enough to be on the receiving end of this new form of chemical warfare. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Desperately Seeking Anti-Submarine Weapons, 1915

    Desperately Seeking Anti-Submarine Weapons, 1915

    By Dan Schlenoff | July 24, 2015 |

    Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: July 24, 1915 The British Royal Navy commanded the sea during World War I; had it not, Britain and France would not have been able to feed and arm themselves with imported food, raw materials and weapons. […]

    Keep reading »

  • The Armored Tortoise Fails, 1915

    The Armored Tortoise Fails, 1915

    By Dan Schlenoff | July 17, 2015 |

    Reported in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: July 17, 1915 By July 1915 World War I had been raging for almost a year. Nearly two million soldiers had died and another four million had been wounded. The vast scale of the casualties was shocking but continued with no end in sight. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Battleship Optimism Ignores Reality, 1915

    Battleship Optimism Ignores Reality, 1915

    By Dan Schlenoff | July 10, 2015 |

    Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: July 10, 1915 An article in the July 10, 1915 issue of Scientific American carried an article about plans for a new French battleship, the Tourville (and by extension the sister ships in the class: Duquesne, Lyon and Lille ). […]

    Keep reading »

  • Women and the War, 1915

    Women and the War, 1915

    By Dan Schlenoff | July 3, 2015 |

    Reported in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: July 3, 1915 By July 1915 the war had been going on for almost a year. German mobilization had proved to be highly effective at ensuring a steady supply of young, healthy men for duties in the army. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Fighting Zeppelins with Airplanes, 1915

    Fighting Zeppelins with Airplanes, 1915

    By Dan Schlenoff | June 26, 2015 |

    Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: June 26, 1915 After the First World War broke out, airships quickly became a scourge. German Zeppelins bombed Liège and Antwerp in Belgium and perhaps hastened the fall of those two cities even though there were few casualties (as we understand such things in our more dismal era). […]

    Keep reading »

  • Italy Is Bribed into War, 1915

    Italy Is Bribed into War, 1915

    By Dan Schlenoff | June 19, 2015 |

    Reported in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: June 19, 1915 Italy declared war on Austria-Hungary on May 23, 1915. The great hope of the Allies was that an army of more than a million men would be thrown against the Austro-Hungarian troops guarding their southern flank at the northeast corner of Italy. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Defense against Poison Gas, 1915

    Defense against Poison Gas, 1915

    By Dan Schlenoff | June 12, 2015 |

    Reported in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: June 12, 1915 Germany (taking a cue from France) first used poison gas on a large scale against Allied troops manning trenches near Ypres, Belgium, on April 22, 1915. The gas was horrifically effective, killing and wounding thousands of soldiers in a matter of minutes. […]

    Keep reading »

  • War and Automobile Advertising, 1915

    By Dan Schlenoff | June 5, 2015 |

    Printed in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: June 5, 1915 Early in World War I violence came to the serene island of Tahiti in the Pacific when two German armored warships attacked Papeete, the capital of what is now called French Polynesia. […]

    Keep reading »

  • The Teeth of the Submarine, 1915

    The Teeth of the Submarine, 1915

    By Dan Schlenoff | May 29, 2015 |

    Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: May 29, 1915 Some of the articles on military subjects in Scientific American lack specific details, pointing to a decision made somewhere to curtail the journalist’s access to the people in the know or places or things of military importance. […]

    Keep reading »


Show More

Email this Article

X